16/03/2020 - 06:58

Morning Headlines

16/03/2020 - 06:58

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Decmil plays the blame game with NZ Corrections

Decmil has been accused of poor organisation and management after being stripped of a New Zealand prison contract but the engineering group’s chief executive says fault also lies with poor design choices. The Fin

Fortress Australia to slow virus

Everyone arriving in Australia must now undergo self-isolation for 14 days as the government braces for a worse-case scenario of as many as 4 million people contracting coronavirus over the next six months. The Fin

Herd immunity may be the key as virus count reaches 279

The federal government’s decision to keep schools open to try develop ‘‘herd immunity’’ has risks but also large potential benefits. The Fin

Chevron’s test wait

Oil and gas giant Chevron has put up to 20 staff in lockdown at its $US54 billion Barrow Island site as it awaits the results of a worker tested for coronavirus. The West

Sports TV rights deals in turmoil

Sports broadcasters and administrators are scrambling to check the fine print of sports rights contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars amid the threat of top football codes and the Olympics being suspended or cancelled. The Aus

NBN, telcos prepare for viral demand

The national broadband network is preparing for the biggest test in its 10-year history, as the COVID-19 crisis forces millions of Australians to work from home and increase their use of streaming services. The Fin

Trump brings relief but volatility stays

Wall Street’s endorsement of US President Donald Trump’s overdue COVID-19 pandemic response should deliver relief for Australian investors today, after incredible volatility underwrote the worst week for the local market since the global financial crisis. The Fin

Isolate rule to kill airlines: Flight Centre

The chief executive of Flight Centre has warned of airline collapses in the wake of tough new quarantine restrictions by the federal government, and a bigger downturn in the Australian economy because travel would all but cease. The Fin

Infected director a dilemma for boards

Coronavirus has claimed its first victim in corporate Australia, with a Bank of Queensland director testing positive for the virus, raising questions about governance processes among the country’s biggest companies. The Aus

No delay for Tokyo

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has resisted pressure for changes to the Tokyo Olympics schedule even as sporting events worldwide fall victim to the COVID-19 pandemic. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Everyone arriving in Australia must now undergo self-isolation for 14 days as the government braces for a worse-case scenario of as many as 4 million people contracting coronavirus over the next six months.

Page 3: Australia, Britain, India and others are calling for a meeting of G20 nations to better co-ordinate the global response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The federal government’s decision to keep schools open to try develop ‘‘herd immunity’’ has risks but also large potential benefits.

Big four consulting firm EY has asked its entire staff to work remotely from this week, one of a growing list of top Australian companies putting their anti-coronavirus plans in motion and sending large chunks of their workforce home.

Page 5: The national broadband network is preparing for the biggest test in its 10-year history, as the COVID-19 crisis forces millions of Australians to work from home and increase their use of streaming services.

The first health data studies of overseas outbreaks of COVID-19 reveal the huge benefits of early and decisive action to limit the spread of infection, and are driving federal and state officials to rapidly plan for the shutdown of most non-essential services.

Page 10: Australian citizens and university students trapped in Wuhan, the city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak, say they now feel safer in China than they would be in Australia as infection rates rise in their home cities of Sydney and Melbourne.

Page 14: Wall Street’s endorsement of US President Donald Trump’s overdue COVID-19 pandemic response should deliver relief for Australian investors today, after incredible volatility underwrote the worst week for the local market since the global financial crisis.

Page 16: The coronavirus outbreak is forcing insurers to grapple with issues such as how to staff call centres in a lockdown, while they increase screening of visitors or double shifts of cleaners.

Page 17: The chief executive of Flight Centre has warned of airline collapses in the wake of tough new quarantine restrictions by the federal government, and a bigger downturn in the Australian economy because travel would all but cease.

Page 18: Internationally recognised battery pioneer Christina Lampe-Onnerud has called for a complete rethink of the way traditional energy is priced to facilitate a more rapid pathway through the transition to clean energy.

Page 20: Decmil has been accused of poor organisation and management after being stripped of a New Zealand prison contract but the engineering group’s chief executive says fault also lies with poor design choices.

 

 

The Australian

Page 3: All international arrivals to Australia may be required to sign an agreement to self-isolate for 14 days if they wish to enter the country, with those who flout the new measure at risk of heavy fines and even time behind bars.

Page 4: Britain is planning a dramatic four-month mass quarantine of everyone over 70 in the most drastic measure yet unveiled in the fight against coronavirus.

Page 5: Employers including IGA, Food-Works and Mitre 10 have called for a one-year wage freeze to be imposed on retail workers, warning the coronavirus crisis could persist for at least 12 months.

Page 6: The Australian scientists who best know COVID-19 warn it is “10 times worse” than flu and spreading faster in Western countries than it did in China.

Page 8: Australia will offer to help nations clean up their Antarctic stations, after acting as polar policeman for a 10,000km inspection blitz that found waste and junk problems but no militarisation or mining.

Page 17: Investors are steeling for another fraught week on financial markets as Europe goes into lockdown and the US Federal Reserve prepares to slash rates, with analysts warning of increased volatility and further declines ahead as the coronavirus pandemic threatens to plunge the global economy into recession.

Coronavirus has claimed its first victim in corporate Australia, with a Bank of Queensland director testing positive for the virus, raising questions about governance processes among the country’s biggest companies.

Page 19: Australian shadow lenders are bracing themselves for a dramatic widening in funding costs amid wild fluctuations in global financial markets, as concerns mount about the health of businesses and households to repay loans.

A group of Melbourne technology entrepreneurs have raised an estimated $10m from investors and sponsors to open an ambitious esport and gaming centre in Melbourne, the largest in the southern hemisphere.

Page 20: Shopping centre landlords are preparing for some of the toughest days since the global financial crisis, when the Centro empire that controlled about $25bn worth of shopping complexes teetered on the brink of bankruptcy.

Page 23: Sports broadcasters and administrators are scrambling to check the fine print of sports rights contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars amid the threat of top football codes and the Olympics being suspended or cancelled.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 2: Everyone arriving in Australia from overseas — including returning Aussies — will be forced to self-isolate for 14 days under tough measures announced by Prime Minister Scott Morrison to slow the spread of the coronavirus. In WA, the penalty for failing to self-isolate will be a fine of up to $50,000.

Page 4: Theatres, cinemas, nightclubs and other big entertainment venues are bracing for significant disruption and loss of revenue as a ban on “static” gatherings of more than 500 comes into force today.

WA holidaymakers appeared unfazed by the latest escalation of the coronavirus pandemic yesterday with fights to Bali mostly filled and departing travellers expressing little reservation about their trips.

Page 6: Oil and gas giant Chevron has put up to 20 staff in lockdown at its $US54 billion Barrow Island site as it awaits the results of a worker tested for coronavirus.

Woolworths has cancelled its pick-up service amid nationwide product shortages as shoppers continue to ignore pleas to stay calm, jostling and threatening each other as they fill their trolleys.

Page 8: The world’s response to the virus is changing at pace and as of last night, Spain was set to go into lockdown, France had joined parts of Germany in closing restaurants, cafes and cinemas, Norway was closing its airports and Austria was about to implement a ban on gatherings of more than five people.

Page 9: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has resisted pressure for changes to the Tokyo Olympics schedule even as sporting events worldwide fall victim to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Business: Australian share investors face another tumultuous day of trading as governments scramble to reduce the damage from coronavirus.

The starting gun has been fired on a collaborative research project to help WA become a global leader in the lithium-ion battery supply chain.

The cost of a roast lamb dinner will soar this winter because long-awaited rain in the Eastern States has pushed up demand for WA sheep.

Most seniors are set to benefit from last Thursday’s emergency cash dump, including those who have only recently applied for a pension or concession card.

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