04/12/2019 - 06:48

Morning Headlines

04/12/2019 - 06:48

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Morning Headlines

Woodside moves forward on $6b Senegal oil project

Woodside Petroleum and its partners in a planned $US4.2 billion ($6.2 billion) oil project in Senegal have taken a significant step towards committing to construction, submitting a development plan to the government just before their licence expired. The Fin

Privacy reforms in focus as ACCC slams loyalty schemes

The consumer watchdog has blasted Coles, Wesfarmers and Woolworths for automatically linking credit cards with loyalty schemes, saying the practice is problematic and causes consumer harm. The Fin

McGowan defends stimulus

Mark McGowan has denied his Government’s latest economic stimulus measure — a $150 million investment in affordable and social housing — is a sign Labor misjudged weakness of the State economy when it came to power. The West

Coalition manoeuvres to keep union bill alive

The Morrison government has signalled a preparedness to make further changes to its union-busting Ensuring Integrity Bill ahead of the legislation’s reintroduction into Parliament today. The Fin

Push to help community connect to agriculture

WA’s agriculture sector is trying to instil a high level of trust in local farmers and fishers who create the State’s food — and says it needs to better engage with the community. The West

ATO scammers cash in on cardless payments

Scammers claiming to be from the Tax Office are fleecing millions from Australians before the different deadlines for repaying tax return debts, and are even using cardless ATM withdrawals and WhatsApp to steal cash. The Fin

Black Friday, Cyber Monday break drought

Retailers are hoping the tide has turned for consumer spending after strongerthan-expected sales over Black Friday and Cyber Monday and early signs confidence is improving as house prices rebound. The Fin

The truck stops with Muchea

The northern outskirts of Perth will host one of WA’s busiest road networks and the State’s biggest petrol station, with the creation of an estate that will reduce truck traffic in the metropolitan area. The West

Stimulus calls to ease as mine exports surge

Booming iron ore and coal exports have raised hopes the national accounts will show improved growth, easing pressure on Josh Frydenberg for an economic stimulus. The Aus

Why today is D-Day for VAD

Today shapes as D-day if WA’s voluntary assisted dying laws are to win the support of Parliament before Christmas. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The outbreak of a new trade battle waged by the United States against bulk commodity exporters Brazil and Argentina, and China rebuking Washington for its support of Hong Kong, forced Australian shares to snap the momentum that pushed the market to reclaim its record high last week.

Maths and science results in Australian schools have collapsed despite government spending on schools hitting nearly $58 billion a year, 70 per cent more than when global school testing started.

Page 3: Fears of a long, hot summer causing large-scale blackouts have forced the Australian Energy Market Operator to lock in a record 1600 megawatts of emergency reserves to help the electricity grid survive the next three months.

Scammers claiming to be from the Tax Office are fleecing millions from Australians before the different deadlines for repaying tax return debts, and are even using cardless ATM withdrawals and WhatsApp to steal cash.

Page 4: The Morrison government has signalled a preparedness to make further changes to its union-busting Ensuring Integrity Bill ahead of the legislation’s reintroduction into Parliament today.

Page 5: The government will push its contentious Medevac repeal bill to a vote this week, with or without the support of Jacqui Lambie, if only to put Labor on the record as voting against it.

Page 6: A serious downturn in productivity in the construction sector may make it harder for one of the country’s biggest unions to sustain claims for 5 per cent annual wage increases.

Page 9: The consumer watchdog has blasted Coles, Wesfarmers and Woolworths for automatically linking credit cards with loyalty schemes, saying the practice is problematic and causes consumer harm.

Page 13: Santos has attracted keen interest from infrastructure investors with a move to separate out its portfolio of domestic and export gas plants and pipelines, one of several moves unveiled alongside a big hike in its 2025 output target.

Page 15: Retailers are hoping the tide has turned for consumer spending after stronger-than-expected sales over Black Friday and Cyber Monday and early signs confidence is improving as house prices rebound.

Page 17: Metcash has slashed the value of goodwill and other assets in its food and grocery business by $237.4 million after losing a contract to supply convenience store chain 7-Eleven.

The new chief executive of Maggie Beer Products owner Longtable Group intends ripping out an extra $1.8 million in costs over the next year as the gourmet foods and dairy company eyes a revival after a rough year.

Page 18: Woodside Petroleum and its partners in a planned $US4.2 billion ($6.2 billion) oil project in Senegal have taken a significant step towards committing to construction, submitting a development plan to the government just before their licence expired.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The Department of Home Affairs has warned the stability of liberal democracies is under threat from new challenges to social cohesion, growing foreign interference and declining public trust in institutions.

Page 2: Booming iron ore and coal exports have raised hopes the national accounts will show improved growth, easing pressure on Josh Frydenberg for an economic stimulus.

Page 4: The European Union’s top representative in Australia says the Coalition’s climate change policies are unlikely to get in the way of an EU-Australia free-trade agreement, amid French calls for “highly ambitious” action on climate change as part of the deal.

Page 5: The Morrison government is concerned about forcing digital giants to pay media companies for using their journalism out of fear they could be interpreted as new taxes, as it moves to respond to the ACCC’s landmark report into digital platforms’ impact on journalism.

Page 6: Australian students are lagging up to 3½ years of schooling behind students of the same age in China and Singapore, with the impact of Australia’s decades-long decline in university entry standards for teachers identified as one cause of the problem.

Page 17: New National Australia Bank boss Ross McEwan has told staff that consultants Bain & Company will assist in a three to four-month review as he works out the next leg of the bank’s strategy.

Page 20: Brazil’s Vale will join BHP in setting carbon emissions targets for its customers, unveiling the move in an investor presentation in New York on Monday night, as the iron ore major plots a path to recovery from a horror year.

Page 21: The prudential regulator has warned that the private health insurance industry may be at an “elevated” risk of operational scandals similar to the financial implosions that triggered the banking royal commission, as it unveils reforms to guard customers against the potential collapse of private health funds.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The bookkeeper accused of acting “in concert” with Paul Whyte and Jacob Anthonisz as part of the Department of Communities corruption scandal is a single mother who spent time working as the receptionist for Mr Anthonisz’s physiotherapy business.

Page 7: Ken Wyatt is facing calls to remove Pauline Hanson from his cross-party working group on indigenous issues after she made offensive comments calling for First Nations people to be subject to DNA tests.

Page 9: Federal Treasury will go ahead with its end of year taxpayer-subsidised Christmas function despite an investigation continuing into the actions of deputy secretary Matt Flavel at one of its staff events.

Page 14: Today shapes as D-day if WA’s voluntary assisted dying laws are to win the support of Parliament before Christmas.

Page 20: Former State treasurer and onetime WA Liberal leader Mike Nahan is quitting politics in 2021 and says his replacement in Riverton must have local experience, as his former policy adviser Anthony Spagnolo emerged as a frontrunner.

A small amount of drugs detected in the mail from Britain has led WA Police to its biggest ever seizure of cryptocurrency — valued at more than $1.5 million.

Page 22: The proportion of people with a disability employed in the public sector would soar more than 300 per cent in the next five years under an ambitious plan unveiled by the State Government.

Business: Liquidators of a collapsed Diploma Group builder-developer company are accusing the family behind it of using money from the business to build themselves mansions in Perth’s western suburbs.

WA’s agriculture sector is trying to instil a high level of trust in local farmers and fishers who create the State’s food — and says it needs to better engage with the community.

Just one Australian bank — ING — has a healthy reputation.

Page 74: The northern outskirts of Perth will host one of WA’s busiest road networks and the State’s biggest petrol station, with the creation of an estate that will reduce truck traffic in the metropolitan area.

Mark McGowan has denied his Government’s latest economic stimulus measure — a $150 million investment in affordable and social housing — is a sign Labor misjudged weakness of the State economy when it came to power.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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