24/10/2019 - 06:49

Morning Headlines

24/10/2019 - 06:49

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Morning Headlines

Billions in the balance as floats flop

Billions of dollars of upcoming stockmarket listings hang in the balance as growing fears of inflated asset values have forced fund managers to retreat. The Aus

TAFE and uni at same time

Students will no longer have to choose between TAFE and university under a proposed major education shake-up that would cut red tape and allow them to do both. The West

Gold targets carbon cuts

The global gold industry has put itself at the forefront of the decarbonisation push by laying out “cost-effective” potential pathways to eliminating carbon emissions from its mines. The West

New deal gets stamp of approval

Buyers of off-the-plan apartments and units will save up to $50,000 on stamp duty under a $29 million State Government rebate scheme to stimulate the sector. The West

Gwalia works will pay off, says Vassie

St Barbara boss Bob Vassie has asked shareholders to be patient after production downgrades at its flagship Gwalia gold mine in WA, telling the company’s annual meeting he understood their frustration as the miner puts its long-term plans into place. The Aus

Setka forced out of ALP in victory for Albanese

Notorious Victorian CFMEU boss John Setka has been forced out of the Labor Party, having dropped a legal appeal against Anthony Albanese’s move to have him expelled over his treatment of women. The Aus

Toddlers’ worlds not as worry-free as we think

A new report has highlighted big gaps in the Australian public’s understanding of early childhood development, in particular a misconception that mental health in babies and toddlers is irrelevant or non-existent. The West

ATO boss slams whistleblower media reports

Tax Commissioner Chris Jordan has hit out at media organisations campaigning against laws criminalising journalism, claiming reports about the ATO’s targeting of whistleblowers are incorrect and misleading. The Fin

Clean energy funding hits three-year low

New investment commitments by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation fell to a three-year low last financial year as the renewable energy target was filled early and the federal government ordered a new focus on reliable, dispatchable power. The Aus

Monetary policy ‘beats’ fiscal stimulus

Newly appointed Treasury secretary Steven Kennedy says monetary policy remains a better response than fiscal stimulus to generate economic growth, but has warned that Australia needs more structural reform. The Fin

Parties urge shorter pre-polling time

Liberal Party federal director Andrew Hirst has called for shorter pre-polling periods and fewer early voting centres, and condemned “appalling and illegal behaviour” in the lead-up to the May 18 election. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: John Setka’s resignation from the Labor Party has failed to appease Senate crossbencher Jacqui Lambie, who says he must also quit his leadership role at the CFMEU or she will vote for a bill making it easier to deregister rogue unions and officials.

Page 3: The prudential regulator’s plan to overhaul banker pay is prescriptive, unworkable and likely to backfire, the peak body for company directors warns.

Page 4: Newly appointed Treasury secretary Steven Kennedy says monetary policy remains a better response than fiscal stimulus to generate economic growth, but has warned that Australia needs more structural reform.

Despite a push from Liberal backbenchers, Senator Cormann ruled out stopping or slowing the legislated rise in the 9.5 per cent compulsory superannuation guarantee rate to 12 per cent incrementally between 2021 and 2025.

Page 5: Tax Commissioner Chris Jordan has hit out at media organisations campaigning against laws criminalising journalism, claiming reports about the ATO’s targeting of whistleblowers are incorrect and misleading.

Page 11: A Senate inquiry into fintech will consider ways to allow consumers to easily move superannuation data to a new fund, which could facilitate switching funds at retirement by allowing providers to better match products to member needs.

Page 17: WiseTech Global has bounced back from a concerted attack from US short seller researchers J Capital, with chief executive Richard White describing the siege as nothing more than a bump in the road.

Rio Tinto has started the ball rolling on possible closures of its loss-making aluminium smelters in Australia and New Zealand, which would cost thousands of jobs.

Page 19: Seven West Media is ramping up its production budget to bring 30 per cent more content to its prime-time schedule in 2020.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Notorious Victorian CFMEU boss John Setka has been forced out of the Labor Party, having dropped a legal appeal against Anthony Albanese’s move to have him expelled over his treatment of women.

Australia will meet its Paris emissions reduction targets if it continues its current ramping up of renewable energy deployment, which has been among the fastest in the world.

Page 2: Federal courts have refused to reveal information about long delays in getting some cases heard and the performance of judges.

Page 4: Australians living in remote and regional areas are dying preventable deaths from treatable conditions because of a lack of access to health services.

Page 6: Liberal Party federal director Andrew Hirst has called for shorter pre-polling periods and fewer early voting centres, and condemned “appalling and illegal behaviour” in the lead-up to the May 18 election.

There have been more than 230,000 assessments under the so-called robodebt scheme where the government has found there is no debt or the amount owed must be reduced, while 169 welfare recipients were already dead when a potential debt was identified.

Page 17: Billions of dollars of upcoming stockmarket listings hang in the balance as growing fears of inflated asset values have forced fund managers to retreat.

Page 19: New investment commitments by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation fell to a three-year low last financial year as the renewable energy target was filled early and the federal government ordered a new focus on reliable, dispatchable power.

Page 20: St Barbara boss Bob Vassie has asked shareholders to be patient after production downgrades at its flagship Gwalia gold mine in WA, telling the company’s annual meeting he understood their frustration as the miner puts its long-term plans into place.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: A new report has highlighted big gaps in the Australian public’s understanding of early childhood development, in particular a misconception that mental health in babies and toddlers is irrelevant or non-existent.

Page 7: A world-first trial will test whether an insomnia tablet can reduce the desire for alcohol, improve sleep and prevent a relapse in those battling alcohol addiction.

Page 8: The voluntary assisted dying Bill has passed one of its biggest hurdles after the Upper House gave overwhelming support for the laws in a crucial vote last night.

Page 9: Buyers of off-the-plan apartments and units will save up to $50,000 on stamp duty under a $29 million State Government rebate scheme to stimulate the sector.

Page 18: Students will no longer have to choose between TAFE and university under a proposed major education shake-up that would cut red tape and allow them to do both.

Page 26: WA’s struggling hospitality industry is “raising the bar” in a bid to entice diners with cheaper meals and creative revamps.

Business: The global gold industry has put itself at the forefront of the decarbonisation push by laying out “cost-effective” potential pathways to eliminating carbon emissions from its mines.

Chinese demand for WA-grown mutton and lower cuts of lamb has skyrocketed, driving up prices, as the country’s massive population looks for alternative proteins to pork after a devastating outbreak of African swine fever.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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