22/10/2019 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

22/10/2019 - 06:54

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Morning Headlines

Big projects to get strike protection

The federal government will move ahead with an industrial relations change that will set the same wages and conditions for the construction lifetime of new major projects, a move it says will provide investor certainty and head off costly industrial action. The Fin

Challenging harvest

WA farmers have started harvesting their grain crops in the northern Wheatbelt amid fears Statewide volumes will be one-third lower than last year after a tough growing season. The West

Law firms hope juniors shun time sheets

Law firms are betting their junior lawyers will choose not to take advantage of new industrial regulations requiring them to clock all their overtime – rules that challenge the profession’s traditional culture of long hours. The Fin

Australia loses 124,000 millionaires after falls in dollar, property prices

Average wealth per adult in Australia has fallen from $US411,060 ($599,000) to $US386,060 in the past 12 months as a result of plummeting property prices and a depreciating dollar. The Fin

Green expert pro nuclear

A parliamentary committee looking into nuclear energy will today begin hearing evidence from a range of international experts — including an American environmentalist who supports the controversial energy source. The West

Facing falling revenue, states consider ways to widen GST

Victoria, Western Australia and ACT Labor governments have left the door open to some change of the goods and services tax following renewed calls from NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet. The Fin

PM tested on secrecy laws

Scott Morrison has declared that journalists should not be prosecuted at the “whim of politicians”, a month after Attorney-General Christian Porter gave himself new powers to make the final call to take reporters to court for exposing government secrets. The Aus

AMP Capital raises $6bn for infrastracture fund

Global investors have rushed to plough cash into an AMP-backed fund that lends money to infrastructure and energy projects as ultra-low interest rates around the world drives the chase for yield. The Aus

Spiking fake VAD news

Former WA governor Malcolm McCusker has personally reached out to all Upper House MPs in a bid to quash fake news concerning proposed voluntary assisted dying laws. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The federal government will move ahead with an industrial relations change that will set the same wages and conditions for the construction lifetime of new major projects, a move it says will provide investor certainty and head off costly industrial action.

Law firms are betting their junior lawyers will choose not to take advantage of new industrial regulations requiring them to clock all their overtime – rules that challenge the profession’s traditional culture of long hours.

Page 3: Average wealth per adult in Australia has fallen from $US411,060 ($599,000) to $US386,060 in the past 12 months as a result of plummeting property prices and a depreciating dollar.

Social media is the place where advertising dollars are headed, and industry experts say companies must use data and artificial intelligence to get the most return on investment.

Page 4: The Australian government’s $166 billion sovereign wealth fund continued its stellar investment performance, delivering an annual return of 11.3 per cent in the 12 months to September 30.

Victoria, Western Australia and ACT Labor governments have left the door open to some change of the goods and services tax following renewed calls from NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet.

Page 6: More than $16 billion has been added to federal government coffers through tax audits and other compliance activities by the ATO, including $1 billion in voluntary disclosures.

Page 8: Labor has waved through legislation to enable free trade agreements with Indonesia, Hong Kong and Peru after the government agreed to a handful of concessions requested by Anthony Albanese in an effort to quell internal dissent.

Page 13: The author of a damaging attack on WiseTech Global has savaged the success of its core software, CargoWise One, and predicted WiseTech’s ‘‘supposed’’ growth will crumble as its valuation plunges.

Page 15: Bauer Media Australia chief executive Brendon Hill has vowed not to close magazines following the $40 million acquisition of Pacific Magazines from Seven West Media, creating a publishing portfolio which will combine Better Homes & Gardens and New Idea with The Australian Women’s Weekly and Gourmet Traveller.

AfterPay Touch has dismissed claims it is a sitting duck for regulatory action saying it is not the subject of any review and is looking forward to contributing to a broad-based review of the payments industry in 2020.

Page 17: BHP has laid down another marker in its campaign to burnish its green credentials, announcing that its Escondida and Spence copper mines in Chile will be fully powered by renewable energy from the mid-2020s.

The task of convincing lenders to stump up money for projects in Mongolia, such as Rio Tinto’s Oyu Tolgoi copper project, just got harder after the nation’s financial system was ruled to have deficient safeguards against money-laundering and the financing of terrorism.

Page 18: Sinosteel says it is no ‘‘fly by nighter’’ and will conduct a thorough review of iron ore development options in Australia’s mid-west before it decides whether to spend billions on new port and rail infrastructure at Oakajee.

Page 19: Australia’s consumer protection watchdog has adopted a ‘‘backwards’’ approach to data privacy that will cause Australia to fall behind global best practice if implemented, Facebook’s global head of privacy regulation says.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Scott Morrison has declared that journalists should not be prosecuted at the “whim of politicians”, a month after Attorney-General Christian Porter gave himself new powers to make the final call to take reporters to court for exposing government secrets.

Page 3: Australia-based media agency Atomic 212 has launched a damages claim against its former chief executive Jason Dooris, accusing him of peddling false allegations that the agency is involved in bribery, fraud and money laundering.

Page 4: The National Redress Scheme will have its funding lifted to more than $45m in a bid to increase access to the program and fasttrack processing for survivors, who are increasingly naming multiple institutions in their applications.

Page 6: Doctors at a hospital home to Australia’s biggest youth gender clinic have sounded the alarm about “puberty blocker” drugs given to transgender-identifying children as young as 10.

Page 17: Treasury Wine Estates chief executive Michael Clarke claims the best years are still in front of the global wine giant as it discusses potential company-transforming acquisitions despite his shock decision to step down from his role, which sent the share price down almost 12 per cent.

Global investors have rushed to plough cash into an AMP-backed fund that lends money to infrastructure and energy projects as ultra-low interest rates around the world drives the chase for yield.

Page 19: Domestic airline passengers fell in the 12 months to August for the first time in four years — in line with the weakening demand being reported by carriers.

Page 20: Trade tensions between the US and China have failed to lift prices for rare earth materials despite the surge of political interest in securing supplies of the commodities, according to Lynas Corporation.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 11: Telethon chairman Richard Goyder has revealed he wants to broaden the iconic fundraiser’s role of giving money to help children in WA and beyond.

Page 16: A parliamentary committee looking into nuclear energy will today begin hearing evidence from a range of international experts — including an American environmentalist who supports the controversial energy source.

Page 18: Former WA governor Malcolm McCusker has personally reached out to all Upper House MPs in a bid to quash fake news concerning proposed voluntary assisted dying laws.

Business: WA farmers have started harvesting their grain crops in the northern Wheatbelt amid fears Statewide volumes will be one-third lower than last year after a tough growing season.

Major WA resources companies have urged the State’s environmental watchdog to hold off on introducing a new greenhouse gas emission policy.

Argo Investments has told shareholders it will stick to its strategy of investing in high-yielding blue chip companies, despite the outperformance of growth shares in recent years.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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