19/09/2019 - 06:50

Morning Headlines

19/09/2019 - 06:50

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Morning Headlines

Joyce defends Qantas’ bottom line

Alan Joyce has defended Qantas’ bottom line after airports complained the airline was more profitable than the country’s four biggest airports combined in a bid to ward off calls for greater regulation. The Fin

In defence of 2000 WA jobs

Perth will host an Australiafirst national defence skills summit in an attempt to secure more than 2000 jobs for West Australians. The West

‘Wind back exports to America’

The Morrison government has warned aluminium producers, including Alcoa and Rio Tinto, to rein in surging exports to the United States to avoid President Donald Trump imposing trade restrictions on Australia.

JPMorgan gets Exxon sales tap

Global energy giant ExxonMobil is understood to have drafted in JPMorgan to sell its Australian oil and gas assets, thought to be worth at least $US2.5bn ($3.65bn). The Aus

Banks, insurers could win out in UK trade deal

The United Kingdom would push to make it easier for British banks and financial services firms to set up in Australia as part of a potential free trade agreement, UK International Trade Secretary Liz Truss said as she downplayed the risk of a no-deal Brexit further fuelling global economic uncertainty. The Fin

Government digs deep for Aboriginal iron ore mine

The Federal Government is lending a helping hand to Australia’s first Aboriginal-owned iron ore mine, tapping the Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility for funds to develop the $45 million project. The West

RAC clears speed bumps

Fewer damaging storms and better investment returns have helped the RAC to a big profit leap, despite hits from its home-care joint venture and the weak property market. The West

Business urged to dive into the Pacific

Australian businesses are being urged to boost investment in the South Pacific on the back of Scott Morrison’s record $1.4bn aid program, which is being targeted to lift living standards and drive economic growth across the key strategic region. The Aus

BlueScope's 'carrot and stick' price fix

Senior BlueScope Steel executives threatened overseas steelmakers with anti-dumping complaints if they did not lift steel prices into Australia, according to court documents filed by the competition regulator in its latest cartel trading case. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Morrison government has warned aluminium producers, including Alcoa and Rio Tinto, to rein in surging exports to the United States to avoid President Donald Trump imposing trade restrictions on Australia.

Page 3: Huang Xiangmo, the Chinese property developer at the centre of a NSW corruption inquiry, understated his income by $170 million over three years and was rapidly moving money offshore as the tax office swooped, according to new court documents.

Page 4: Alan Joyce has defended Qantas’ bottom line after airports complained the airline was more profitable than the country’s four biggest airports combined in a bid to ward off calls for greater regulation.

Page 6: Liberal MPs have pushed back against competition regulator chairman Rod Sims angling for a new ‘‘deep dive’’ inquiry into the pricing power of the big four banks, arguing the industry must be given time to implement other reforms.

Page 9: The United Kingdom would push to make it easier for British banks and financial services firms to set up in Australia as part of a potential free trade agreement, UK International Trade Secretary Liz Truss said as she downplayed the risk of a no-deal Brexit further fuelling global economic uncertainty.

Page 10: The Morrison government has prioritised criminalising wage theft as the first of its industrial relations reforms and has raised the prospect of up to 10 years’ jail time for the most serious cases.

Page 15: US major ExxonMobil will seek a buyer for all its Bass Strait oil and gas operations in a move that would trigger a multi-billion-dollar shake-up of the industry on the east coast amid heightened political and regulatory pressure over elevated gas prices.

Page 21: The a2 Milk Company chief executive Jayne Hrdlicka has dismissed suggestions that Chinese authorities delayed approving a licence for rival Bellamy’s Australia to drive down its share price.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton would have tough new powers to strip the citizenship of dual-national terrorists, covering a larger pool of people, under strengthened national security legislation to be introduced to parliament on Thursday.

Page 2: Australia has been barred from speaking at a UN climate summit in New York next week, where China and India will call for trillions of dollars more in climate funding from the developed world.

Page 4: Australian businesses are being urged to boost investment in the South Pacific on the back of Scott Morrison’s record $1.4bn aid program, which is being targeted to lift living standards and drive economic growth across the key strategic region.

Page 8: Schools are being urged to target minority groups when recruiting for leadership roles, amid concerns about a lack of gender, racial and cultural diversity across the teaching workforce, particularly in the senior ranks.

Page 17: Senior BlueScope Steel executives threatened overseas steelmakers with anti-dumping complaints if they did not lift steel prices into Australia, according to court documents filed by the competition regulator in its latest cartel trading case.

Page 18: Global energy giant ExxonMobil is understood to have drafted in JPMorgan to sell its Australian oil and gas assets, thought to be worth at least $US2.5bn ($3.65bn).

Page 19: The head of Virgin Australia’s Velocity frequent flyer program stands to become the airline group’s best paid executive if the purchase of Affinity’s 35 per cent stake goes ahead.

Wagering giant Tabcorp has taken a leap towards its broader US sport ambitions after signing a deal with the NFL.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Defence says a strategic proposal to shift future submarine assets to a new naval base on the east coast is being considered, but warns it could be years off.

Page 5: Perth will host an Australia-first national defence skills summit in an attempt to secure more than 2000 jobs for West Australians.

The Prime Minister has defended another inquiry into the family law system and confirmed the Government would support One Nation leader Pauline Hanson’s bid to serve as its co-chair.

Page 8: The University of WA student guild has called on the university to reject any deal with the controversial Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation, claiming its courses defend racism and threaten academic freedom.

Page 18: Federal Liberal MP Ben Morton is asking candidates in next month’s Melville council election to “pledge” support for Roe 8 and 9.

Page 20: The first live sheep ship to sail from Australian shores since the embattled trade was brought to a standstill more than three months ago will depart Fremantle next week.

Business: Fewer damaging storms and better investment returns have helped the RAC to a big profit leap, despite hits from its home-care joint venture and the weak property market.

The Federal Government is lending a helping hand to Australia’s first Aboriginal-owned iron ore mine, tapping the Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility for funds to develop the $45 million project.

Yara Pilbara could be asked to provide a more detailed plan on how it will keep emissions from its fertiliser plant on the Burrup Peninsula as low as possible to protect 40,000-year-old rock art in the area.

Kathmandu chief Xavier Simonet says a focus on function rather than fashion is resonating with customers as the nation’s love for puffer jackets drives a record profit haul.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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