18/09/2019 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

18/09/2019 - 06:54

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Morning Headlines

BHP: carbon cuts good for iron ore

BHP has brushed off Morrison government complaints about big business pandering to activist shareholders, vowing to press ahead with plans to take more responsibility for the carbon emissions of Chinese steel mills and its other big customers. The Fin

Libs claim polling shows there’s hope

Liza Harvey is within striking distance of winning government, with the Liberal Party gaining ground in 11 marginal seats that could hold the key to the next State election. The West

Google points to billions of clicks, rejects need for code

Google Australia managing director Melanie Silva has accused the competition regulator of overlooking more than three billion referrals to Australian news organisations and existing commercial agreements, brushing off the need for a code to govern business deals with local media companies. The Fin

Risk-shy directors failing to innovate

Australia’s attempts to build a smarter country are threatened by risk-averse company directors who pay lip service to innovation and lack science and technology expertise, says a new study. The West

Don't pull the gas trigger, Origin warns

Power giant Origin Energy has warned the federal government against expanding its gas export trigger over fears the “extreme intervention” may jeopardise lucrative LNG contracts and further diminish Australia’s investment reputation. The Aus

Test banks on fairness, ACCC says

The competition watchdog is seeking approval from Josh Frydenberg to conduct another inquiry into banks after persistent complaints that consumers are not being treated fairly. The Aus

Oil sector digs in for extended disruption

Mounting expectations that Saudi Arabia could take until the end of the year to recover from what is being described as the single biggest oil supply outage in history, are bolstering support for Australia’s producers, with investors maneuvering to benefit. The Fin

NBN unveils faster pick, lower prices

NBN Co has unveiled an ultra-fast broadband bundle that it says will give consumers access to gigabit per second speeds at a 68 per cent discount on current prices, in a new price plan that includes several tweaks to existing bundles. The Fin

China harvest goes begging as milk producers delay organic shift

A shortage of organic dairy operations in Australia means farmers are missing out on the full benefit of demand from China for quality baby formula and other milk products. The Aus

Big bucks theory for teachers

Unqualified trainee teachers would be paid to learn on the job under a proposal to boost the number of science and maths teachers in WA high schools. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: BHP has brushed off Morrison government complaints about big business pandering to activist shareholders, vowing to press ahead with plans to take more responsibility for the carbon emissions of Chinese steel mills and its other big customers.

Page 2: Google Australia managing director Melanie Silva has accused the competition regulator of overlooking more than three billion referrals to Australian news organisations and existing commercial agreements, brushing off the need for a code to govern business deals with local media companies.

Page 4: Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese will side with big businesses against the Morrison government by backing their right to speak out on social and environmental issues, as he pledges to rebuild relations with the corporate sector.

Page 5: Superannuation funds are at risk of being sued by regulators and members if they fail to act on climate change, Mills Oakley financial services partner Mark Bland says.

Page 6: Company directors are failing to drive innovation and navigate technology disruption because boards and investors are too often focused on short-term financial results and governance risks.

Page 8: Reducing airports’ passenger charges would lead to cheaper airfares for consumers and deliver a significant lift in productivity, the chiefs of Qantas and Virgin Australia will say on Wednesday as they combine to pressure the Morrison government to act on their monopoly.

Page 13: TPG Telecom continued to talk to mobile equipment vendors to discuss a 5G rollout after boss David Teoh announced the decision to scrap construction of a 4G network, the Federal Court has heard.

Mounting expectations that Saudi Arabia could take until the end of the year to recover from what is being described as the single biggest oil supply outage in history, are bolstering support for Australia’s producers, with investors maneuvering to benefit.

Page 15: Bellamy’s Australia has hired Grant Samuel to compile an independent expert report on a $1.5 billion takeover offer by $25 billion giant China Mengniu Dairy Company, as the group steps up a push to lift sales made through daigou traders to offset a profit slide from regulatory delays.

Page 16: NBN Co has unveiled an ultra-fast broadband bundle that it says will give consumers access to gigabit per second speeds at a 68 per cent discount on current prices, in a new price plan that includes several tweaks to existing bundles.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The competition watchdog is seeking approval from Josh Frydenberg to conduct another inquiry into banks after persistent complaints that consumers are not being treated fairly.

Page 3: An online fraud syndicate declared themselves Team Awesome as they allegedly swindled almost $2m from the superannuation funds and share trading accounts of unsuspecting victims, a court heard.

Page 4: A shortage of organic dairy operations in Australia means farmers are missing out on the full benefit of demand from China for quality baby formula and other milk products.

Page 5: A planned national database using facial-recognition technology to match identities to driving licences, passports and other documents could see people targeted for “trivial” matters and could pave the way to a surveillance state, it has been claimed.

Page 9: Donald Trump has declared a military strike on Iran would be a proportionate response to its suspected role in attacking Saudi Arabian oil facilities and said the US would know for certain “very shortly” if Iran was responsible.

Page 17: Power giant Origin Energy has warned the federal government against expanding its gas export trigger over fears the “extreme intervention” may jeopardise lucrative LNG contracts and further diminish Australia’s investment reputation.

Page 20: A fatality at a Queensland coal mine and a poor operational performance in sections of BHP’s business has cost chief executive Andrew Mackenzie a large portion of his bonus cheque.

Page 21: Australians are among the most “rapid adaptors” of cashless payments in the world, but that doesn’t spell the end of banknotes for many years as cash in circulation continues to grow.

Page 26: Education Minister Dan Tehan has co-opted five vicechancellors to advise him on the next wave of higher education reform, creating a new channel to liaise with universities outside of the existing formal structures.

Page 27: Britain’s decision to reintroduce a two-year work visa for international students after graduation is a popular move likely to attract students away from Australia, according to industry leaders.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The Defence Minister yesterday refused to put a deadline on when a highly secretive probe into “rumours and allegations” of possible war crimes by Australian Special Forces personnel in Afghanistan would be concluded.

Page 5: A decision to pay scandal-laden media personality Sam Newman to host a grand final event at Optus Stadium has been questioned, but the controversial figure has hit back, claiming he has “better core values” than 90 per cent of West Australians.

Page 11: Bugs in the gut are already known to have an impact on human health such as blood pressure, obesity and but bacteria in the uterus is emerging as the next frontier in conceiving.

Page 14: Liza Harvey is within striking distance of winning government, with the Liberal Party gaining ground in 11 marginal seats that could hold the key to the next State election.

Page 16: State Education Minister Sue Ellery has given tacit support for WA students planning to walk out of classrooms this Friday to join international protests calling for action on climate change.

Page 22: A contentious God ban in parts of the Swan Valley to “protect” the character of the region could get the green light at a council meeting next week.

Page 28: The presumptive dean of St George’s Cathedral, Canon Nicholas Jepson-Biddle, has withdrawn his nomination for the role after The West Australian revealed last month the English priest had made jokes about “boy seaman” on Facebook.

Page 30: Unqualified trainee teachers would be paid to learn on the job under a proposal to boost the number of science and maths teachers in WA high schools.

Page 31: Suspended City of Perth lord mayor Lisa Scaffidi denied bullying a senior staff member to rush the contract process for a new chief executive, an inquiry has heard.

Business: Australia’s attempts to build a smarter country are threatened by risk-averse company directors who pay lip service to innovation and lack science and technology expertise, says a new study.

Australia’s live export industry provides more than 3000 full-time jobs across Australia and enables about $100 million to be retained on farms each year, according to a new analysis that demonstrates the important role the industry plays in the economy.

Perth’s distinct neighbourhoods form the “good bones” that give it the potential to continue to grow into a great city, according to global expert Gabriella Gomez-Mont, the keynote speaker at last Friday’s Town Team Conference in Perth.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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