30/08/2019 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

30/08/2019 - 06:54

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Morning Headlines

Butler hits back over WA emissions move

Federal Labor has fired back at Western Australia’s ALP government over greenhouse gas emissions after Premier Mark McGowan and his Cabinet sided with Prime Minister Scott Morrison. The Fin

160,000 WA jobs

More than 160,000 jobs could be created in WA through emerging sectors — a third of them in regional areas. The West

Potential $50b wave of gas M&A deals around the corner

Almost $50 billion of oil and gas assets could potentially change hands in the Australian region over the next few years, according to consultancy Wood Mackenzie, which is foreshadowing a shake-up in LNG infrastructure ownership as well as takeovers of juniors offering exposure to high east coast gas prices. The Fin

Woolworths aims to ram home early wins

Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci says the group will try to ensure the extra momentum built up in supermarket sales from a flying start to July and August becomes a permanent advantage over fierce rival Coles. The Fin

Business investment falls, outlook flat

Business is unlikely to increase investment spending this financial year after a disappointing June quarter for capital expenditure forced economists to predict economic growth will be just 1.5 per cent – the slowest since financial year 2009. The Fin

Western Gas seeks backers for project

Western Gas is understood to have hired Goldman Sachs to find an investor in its Equus Gas Project that it acquired two years ago from US-based energy company Hess. The Aus

Religion bill will make it ‘harder to sack people’

Larger businesses, including sporting bodies, will find it harder to sack people in situations such as the Israel Folau case under a new Religious Discrimination Act proposed by the Morrison government. The Fin

Palladium has little to say on Bishop job

Global consulting firm Palladium has brushed off concerns about Julie Bishop’s move to join its board with a 54-word submission to a parliamentary committee examining the former foreign minister’s appointment. The Fin

Fear of Aussie beef with Trump

A trade deal that Donald Trump struck with Japan this week could significantly disrupt Australian beef exports, cattle industry and trade experts say. The Aus

Industries unite in push for hands-on skills training

Business heavyweights are “screaming out” for more high school graduates to take up vocational training over university degrees, partnering with government in a joint outreach program to fill the skills shortage. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Security firm Paladin was fined more than 1000 times for ‘‘performance failures’’ by the Home Affairs Department, even as officials insisted they were happy with its delivery of a $532 million refugee services contract for the Morrison government on Manus Island.

Page 3: Former Labor senator Sam Dastyari told NSW Labor Party secretary Kaila Murnain to ‘‘cover her arse’’ after she became distressed over potentially improper donations and developer Huang Xiangmo.

Page 4: Larger businesses, including sporting bodies, will find it harder to sack people in situations such as the Israel Folau case under a new Religious Discrimination Act proposed by the Morrison government.

Page 5: Business is unlikely to increase investment spending this financial year after a disappointing June quarter for capital expenditure forced economists to predict economic growth will be just 1.5 per cent – the slowest since financial year 2009.

Page 6: Living standards are strong and ‘‘have never been better’’ worldwide thanks to China’s economic rise, despite uncertainty in the global economy, incoming Treasury secretary Steven Kennedy says.

Page 7: Ten per cent of property borrowers using a mortgage broker to arrange their loan are struggling to meet repayments within 12 months, with many missing at least one repayment, according to an ASIC review of mortgage brokers and home lending.

Page 8: Federal Labor has fired back at Western Australia’s ALP government over greenhouse gas emissions after Premier Mark McGowan and his Cabinet sided with Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Page 9: Australia has missed the opportunity to build a large nuclear reactor and should now begin the long process of preparing for a new generation of compact reactors to power country towns and remote mines, businessman Ziggy Switkowski says.

Page 14: Global consulting firm Palladium has brushed off concerns about Julie Bishop’s move to join its board with a 54-word submission to a parliamentary committee examining the former foreign minister’s appointment.

Page 21: Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci says the group will try to ensure the extra momentum built up in supermarket sales from a flying start to July and August becomes a permanent advantage over fierce rival Coles.

Page 27: The NSW Independent Liquor and Gaming Authority inquiry into Crown Resorts will examine whether James Packer’s sale of two stakes in the business to Lawrence Ho constitutes a breach of the casino group’s licence to operate its casino at Barangaroo in Sydney.

Almost $50 billion of oil and gas assets could potentially change hands in the Australian region over the next few years, according to consultancy Wood Mackenzie, which is foreshadowing a shake-up in LNG infrastructure ownership as well as takeovers of juniors offering exposure to high east coast gas prices.

Page 30: Huawei Technologies says it is ‘‘actively’’ interested in building the first undersea fibre-optic cable between South America and Asia.

 

 

The Australian

Page 3: Apple yesterday apologised after it emerged that external contractors had listened to thousands of snippets of conversations between Apple users and Siri.

Page 5: Scott Morrison has been accused of hypocrisy by one of News Corp Australia’s most senior figures, who says the Prime Minister’s concerns over the treatment of writer Yang Hengjun in China don’t match with concerns for press freedom at home.

Page 6: The Liberal architects of Australia’s same-sex marriage legislation have given their broad backing to Scott Morrison’s religious discrimination bill as conservatives warn he must not disappoint the party’s religious base.

Page 8: A trade deal that Donald Trump struck with Japan this week could significantly disrupt Australian beef exports, cattle industry and trade experts say.

Page 9: Australia’s senior executives and managers are doing a “terrible job” motivating employees, who rank their bosses the worst among 12 countries for leadership skills, new research finds.

Page 17: APRA will dramatically ramp up its stress-testing of the nation’s banks amid mounting concern inside the prudential regulator about the level of risk posed by a deteriorating domestic and global outlook.

Page 18: Western Gas is understood to have hired Goldman Sachs to find an investor in its Equus Gas Project that it acquired two years ago from US-based energy company Hess.

Page 19: Livestock exporter Wellard has blamed Turkey’s halt on live cattle imports and idle ships for widening its annual loss as it warned it had breached its banking covenants.

Page 20: Shares in mining services company Ausdrill surged on the back of a strong earnings result yesterday, triggering a possible exit for major shareholder Gresham Private Equity.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Perth Federal Labor MP Patrick Gorman says it is “entirely possible” for WA to act on climate change and have one of the world’s most efficient resources sectors.

Page 8: More than 160,000 jobs could be created in WA through emerging sectors — a third of them in regional areas.

Business heavyweights are “screaming out” for more high school graduates to take up vocational training over university degrees, partnering with government in a joint outreach program to fill the skills shortage.

Page 21: Tens of thousands of Australians at retirement age have amassed more than $1.2 billion in university debts they are unlikely to ever repay.

Page 24: Settlers Lifestyle, the company behind WA retirement villages Settlers Lakeside, near Mandurah, and Settlers Ridgewood has gone into voluntary administration, throwing the future of hundreds of retirees into uncertainty.

Business: Billionaire Jack Ma, long an outspoken advocate for China’s extreme work culture, says people should be able to work just 12 hours a week with the benefits of artificial intelligence.

David Jones has promised “an absolute focus on the upper-middle to top end of the market” after a 42 per cent slump in annual profit.

The State’s environmental watchdog has welcomed the McGowan Government’s “aspiration” for WA to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 but there appears to be no agreement on how it applies to emissions over the next 30 years.

Newly rebranded mining contractor Perenti is stepping up its adoption of technology to attract new clients.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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