28/01/2014 - 06:43

Morning Headlines

28/01/2014 - 06:43

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

Building union took bribes

Building union took bribes

A Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union official quit yesterday after being told that Fairfax Media was about to reveal that officials from the powerful union are being bribed by corrupt companies that need their support to win multi-million dollar contracts. The Fin

NW ore to clean up in China

Chinese demand for the Pilbara’s premium-grade iron ore looks set to strengthen on the back of tougher air pollution standards imposed by Beijing. The West

More budget cuts forecast

The Barnett Government will have to make even more Budget cuts or risk adding to the State’s mounting debt, one of the nation’s most respected forecasters has warned. The West

No apologies from Buswell over ‘humane’ shark killing

Former fisheries minister Troy Buswell — one of the key architects of the Barnett Government’s new shark control policy — has admitted images of a shark being shot in the head at close range are “not pleasant”. The West

Japanese trade deal timed for Abe visit

Australia and Japan are preparing to sign a free trade agreement in July when Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will travel to Canberra and become the first Japanese leader to address the Australian parliament. The Aus

Sims applauds shift into grocery discounts

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims has welcomed a decision by Woolworths and Coles to reallocate spending on deep petrol discounts to groceries. The Fin

Warning on carbon penalty

Energy suppliers controlling $120 billion in assets have cautioned the Coalition against penalties for companies that fail to meet carbon emissions targets under its Direct Action policy, warning that this would drive up the cost of energy. The Aus

Drivers will get used to quay diversion: Buswell

Transport Minister Troy Buswell believes motorists will adapt quickly to the diversion of Riverside Drive, which takes effect today. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: A Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union official quit yesterday after being told that Fairfax Media was about to reveal that officials from the powerful union are being bribed by corrupt companies that need their support to win multi-million dollar contracts.

Federal Labor has abandoned its foreign policy support for the Abbott government and accused it of another “diplomatic stumble”, after Foreign Minister Julie Bishop elevated the US above China as Australia’s most important economic partner.

Page 9: Some state treasurers have backed calls for improved co-operation with the federal government on infrastructure projects after a university research group criticised “wasteful spending”, saying the statutory advisory agency Infrastructure Australia should be quarantined from federal politics.

Russia has imposed a ban on Australian beef by-products such as offal over the use of a growth stimulant allowed in some nations but that Moscow considers unsafe.

The business case for the $13 billion WestConnex freeway in Sydney relies on traffic projections from two companies that supplied forecasts for toll roads in Brisbane that ended in multibillion-dollar failures.

Page 10: The federal government’s Commission of Audit has been urged to focus on reducing public service jobs to rein in spending that has continued to climb despite talk of public service cuts.

Page 11: Asian stocks were hammered on Monday as fears of a growing emerging markets meltdown gripped the region and looked certain to slip into Australia.

Page 13: Tatts Group chief executive Robbie Cooke will unveil a brand overhaul in the second half of 2014, including a potential name change, as the lotteries and wagering company seeks to catch up after a period of under-investment in online and marketing.

Ten Network Holdings has signed about $30million worth of sponsorship and advertising revenue for its Winter Olympics coverage, more than doubling its investment for the event.

As a second wave of global retailers prepares to invade Australia, Nigel Austin’s Cotton On Group is vying for the title of the world’s fastest-growing retailer with a “coals to Newcastle” strategy that will see it expand into another half a dozen countries this year.

Page 18: The new chief executive of advertising firm Ogilvy Australia says traditional agencies should look to integrate with digital marketers rather than compete against them for clients.

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims has welcomed a decision by Woolworths and Coles to reallocate spending on deep petrol discounts to groceries.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Australia and Japan are preparing to sign a free trade agreement in July when Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will travel to Canberra and become the first Japanese leader to address the Australian parliament.

Page 4: The superannuation industry has warned that continued changes to tax and regulation are major risks to the sector’s involvement in infrastructure investments and could discourage foreign funds from bidding for privatised government assets.

Joe Hockey has given a directive to set Australia’s debt limit at $500 billion, despite parliament voting to abolish the ceiling altogether.

Page 5: Independent and Catholic schools received greater increases in government funding per student than public schools over the past five years.

Page 6: New anti-discrimination laws that allow companies to target only indigenous employees should be urgently introduced, says the nation’s peak resource employer group.

Page 15: Energy suppliers controlling $120 billion in assets have cautioned the Coalition against penalties for companies that fail to meet carbon emissions targets under its Direct Action policy, warning that this would drive up the cost of energy.

Several sub-contractors to Forge Group’s troubled Diamantina power station project in Queensland are said to be going unpaid as concerns continue to mount about Forge’s financial position.

Page 17: Graincorp is considering an overhaul of its executive remuneration plan after the abortive takeover bid by Archers Daniel Midland triggered incentive payments and a near doubling of pay at the east coast grain handling, malt and edible oils business.

Page 22: Organisations have been urged to closely examine their cloud computing contracts, especially with overseas suppliers, to avoid breaching new privacy laws that could see fines of up to $1.7 million.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Serco has declared its guards were not to blame for the escape of three prisoners this month.

Page 2: The Barnett Government will have to make even more Budget cuts or risk adding to the State’s mounting debt, one of the nation’s most respected forecasters has warned.

Page 4: Former Australian Defence Force chief Peter Cosgrove is expected to be announced as Australia’s new governor general today.

Page 6: Former fisheries minister Troy Buswell — one of the key architects of the Barnett Government’s new shark control policy — has admitted images of a shark being shot in the head at close range are “not pleasant”.

Page 10: China is seeking environmental approval for a climate change research station in Antarctica.

Page 11: An Australian-made gold bullion coin worth more than $50 million has gone on display in Germany as part of a three-week European tour.

Page 13: Members of the Federal Government’s green army will be paid as little as $10 an hour as part of Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s war on weeds.

Page 15: Transport Minister Troy Buswell believes motorists will adapt quickly to the diversion of Riverside Drive, which takes effect today.

Business: Chinese demand for the Pilbara’s premium-grade iron ore looks set to strengthen on the back of tougher air pollution standards imposed by Beijing.

The WA Local Government Association believes it has set a standard for the sector to build on as it settles into new headquarters in West Leederville today.

Barclays is considering ending its £40 million-a-year ($76 million-a-year) sponsorship of the Premier League after senior figures at the bank said it had “zero value” in Britain.

A global glut of nickel may contract by 43 per cent this year as Indonesia’s ban on raw ore shipments crimps supply while demand rises in China, according to Sumitomo Metal Mining.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options