13/08/2019 - 06:48

Morning Headlines

13/08/2019 - 06:48

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Fast-track visas for world’s best

The federal government will establish a new, high-skilled migration stream that will fast-track visas for 5000 of the world’s best and brightest every year with the aim of entrenching high-tech industries in Australia. The Fin

Howzat? Smith’s mattress deal a winner

Whether or not Steve Smith can make another two centuries in the second Ashes Test starting on Wednesday, his most impressive score is arguably off the field: an investment in an online mattress

retailer of $100,000 that’s now worth $12.1 million. The Fin

Farmers grow profits

Many of WA’s broadacre farmers have enjoyed one of their most profitable seasons on record, with farm equity levels at their highest in more than 20 years. The West

Unshackling opportunity

The prohibitive time and costs associated with planning applications for new business ventures will be slashed in a bid to breathe fresh life into town centres and high streets suffocated by unnecessary red tape. The West

Spending ineffective to keeping up with population growth

The government’s independent infrastructure adviser has blamed ineffective ‘‘catch-up’’ spending for lost progress in Australia’s fastest-growing cities. The Fin

ACCC warns cryptocurrency and super scams on the rise

Cryptocurrency and superannuation investment scams are on the rise, with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission warning it expects Australians to be swindled out of a record $532 million in all kinds of scams by the end of the year. The Fin

BHP, Rio the best bets, says Argo chief

BHP and Rio Tinto are two of the best bets for sharemarket investors as valuations of most industrial stocks hit their upper limit in a volatile market, says the managing director of the $6 billion listed investment company Argo Investments.

Time to change Act that lets east coast slow us down

Business Council of Australia chief Jennifer Westacott says major resources projects are being tied up in “green tape” which are acting as a “silent and costly dead weight” on the national economy and jobs. The West

Symond eyes comeback for Aussie Home Loans

Aussie John Symond, who orchestrated an assault on the banks in the nineties, could be about to reemerge as a force in the nation’s $1.8 trillion home loan market. The Aus

Prelude LNG could be too hot to handle

Shell’s giant Prelude LNG facility off northern WA has shipped its fifth cargo but its gas is too hot for its customers. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The federal government will establish a new, high-skilled migration stream that will fast-track visas for 5000 of the world’s best and brightest every year with the aim of entrenching high-tech industries in Australia.

Page 2: Superannuation members aged under 25 are paying up to five times as much in life insurance premiums as their age group receives in insurance payouts when they die or are injured.

Page 3: Liberal MPs pushing for changes to industrial relations laws say they are mindful of the political damage caused by WorkChoices and accept any change must have community support.

The government’s independent infrastructure adviser has blamed ineffective ‘‘catch-up’’ spending for lost progress in Australia’s fastest-growing cities.

Page 4: Superannuation fund offerings will be rated red, amber or green when the prudential regulator publishes individual performance assessments for the first time.

Page 6: The Australian government has announced the next leg of its Pacific step-up ahead of Scott Morrison’s visit to Tuvalu this week, spending $19 million on establishing a new security college to train officials from the region.

Page 7: Defence Minister Linda Reynolds has stressed the importance of rare earths supply to Australia and its allies amid fears that China will use market domination to cripple technology companies and key military suppliers.

Page 8: Cryptocurrency and superannuation investment scams are on the rise, with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission warning it expects Australians to be swindled out of a record $532 million in all kinds of scams by the end of the year.

Page 13: JB Hi-Fi chief executive Richard Murray is feeling ‘‘cautiously optimistic’’ about the year ahead as consumers start loosening the purse strings after the weakest retail conditions since the global financial crisis.

Page 15: BHP and Rio Tinto are two of the best bets for sharemarket investors as valuations of most industrial stocks hit their upper limit in a volatile market, says the managing director of the $6 billion listed investment company Argo Investments.

One of the world’s top gold investors has urged Australian miners to avoid overpaying for acquisitions while gold prices are high, amid expectations the future of Kalgoorlie’s Superpit could be clarified this week.

Page 19: The chemical industry has issued a fresh call for government intervention to bring down east coast gas prices, backed by new findings that every petajoule of gas used by chemical makers supports 80 times more jobs and creates 33 times more economic value than the LNG sector does.

Page 22: Whether or not Steve Smith can make another two centuries in the second Ashes Test starting on Wednesday, his most impressive score is arguably off the field: an investment in an online mattress retailer of $100,000 that’s now worth $12.1 million.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A $200 billion investment pipeline in major projects over the next five years must be replicated on a rolling basis for the next 15 years and beyond to prevent living standards from going backwards, a landmark infrastructure audit has warned.

Page 4: Australian food and drinks companies could be forced to re-name their products and change colours on their packaging under restrictions being proposed by the European Union.

Page 6: The rollout of 5G mobile networks across Australia will require a “new wave of infrastructure investment” over the next five years that will create cost, planning and security challenges.

Page 8: Hong Kong’s airport, one of the world’s busiest, yesterday cancelled all remaining flights for the day after thousands of prodemocracy protesters crowded into the main terminal.

Page 17: Aussie John Symond, who orchestrated an assault on the banks in the nineties, could be about to reemerge as a force in the nation’s $1.8 trillion home loan market.

Corporate Australia is banking on tax cuts and ultra-low interest rates to spur retail spending and the housing market but business leaders remain cautious on the outlook while the economy undergoes a “reset”.

Page 21: ASIC will conduct surveillance of climate-change disclosure practices by selected listed companies in the coming year after the watchdog revealed yesterday it had published updates to its regulatory guidance on the issue.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: The prohibitive time and costs associated with planning applications for new business ventures will be slashed in a bid to breathe fresh life into town centres and high streets suffocated by unnecessary red tape.

Business Council of Australia chief Jennifer Westacott says major resources projects are being tied up in “green tape” which are acting as a “silent and costly dead weight” on the national economy and jobs.

Page 8: A 12-month free parking trial on Hay Street in East Perth has begun.

Page 9: The teachers’ union has called for NAPLAN testing to be scrapped for Year 3 students to allow schools to devote more time to letting children learn through play.

Page 14: Ginger and shallot lobster worth $180 and $70 barramundi were among the delicacies enjoyed by a City of Perth councillor and eight friends at a lavish $480 dinner paid for by the public purse, an inquiry has heard.

Page 16: Australia faces a generation of increased welfare dependence unless more is done to provide support for children with severe anxiety and mental health issues.

Business: Many of WA’s broadacre farmers have enjoyed one of their most profitable seasons on record, with farm equity levels at their highest in more than 20 years.

Shell’s giant Prelude LNG facility off northern WA has shipped its fifth cargo but its gas is too hot for its customers.

Australian Finance Group does not believe its $120 million purchase of privately owned Connective Group will trouble the competition regulator even though the combined company will account for 40 per cent of the mortgage broking market.

Clough’s US arm has won a $US620 million ($918 million) contract to build a petrochemical plant in the US.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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