24/07/2019 - 06:52

Morning Headlines

24/07/2019 - 06:52

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Morning Headlines

BHP’s carbon hard line

BHP will push customers around the world to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions as part of a $US400 million ($569.8 million) spend on new technologies and strategies to reduce its carbon footprint. The Fin

Santos stresses bigger role for WA gas exports

Santos has set its sights on exporting a growing share of its big West Australian gas production base through the state’s existing liquefied natural gas plants, as chief executive Kevin Gallagher warns that greater access to international markets will be crucial if WA is to avoid a gas price spike in coming years. The Aus

Green loan $120m

Taxpayers will lend $120 million to fund solar panels, special light globes and insulation among other emissions reduction measures for Curtin University’s new student lodgings in a move blasted as a “gross misuse of public money”. The West

Woolies media arm to harness shopping data

Woolworths is rolling out a new digital billboard advertising network across its supermarkets, liquor stores BWS and Dan Murphy’s, and retailer Big W as part of the retail giant’s overall shake-up to capitalise on its assets and partner with other businesses looking to tap into its scale. The Fin

APRA puts investors, boards on collision course

Investors are threatening to vote against APRA-approved bank bonuses, as they head on a collision course with boards over executive pay. The Fin

$4000 for each WA athlete

WA Olympians and Paralympians will be individually funded by taxpayers for the first time in a new $4000 pledge from the State Government for athletes selected to compete at next year’s Tokyo Games. The West

IPOs rarer, but better performers

Only 23 companies joined the Australian Securities Exchange in the first six months of 2019, barely half the five-year average, but the group that did list has trounced the performance of the broader All Ordinaries Index. The Fin

CFMEU slapped with $65m in penalties

More than $65 million in legal fees and fines have been levied against the country’s most militant union over the past 15 years and paid for largely out of workers’ membership dues, according to government analysis. The Aus

Consultants fear the party’s over

Nervous consultants fear a slowing economy and fraying ties with China will wreck record-breaking growth in spending on consulting firms by governments and banks, which exceeded $US2.3 billion ($3.3bn) for the first time last year. The Aus

  

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: BHP will push customers around the world to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions as part of a $US400 million ($569.8 million) spend on new technologies and strategies to reduce its carbon footprint.

Investors are threatening to vote against APRA-approved bank bonuses, as they head on a collision course with boards over executive pay.

Page 3: The securities regulator is leaning on the Morrison government to consider closing a regulatory loophole to end conflicted remuneration for financial advisers receiving lucrative commissions to sell listed funds to retail investors.

Page 4: Network Ten has given star MasterChef hosts Matt Preston, Gary Mehigan and George Calombaris the chop after it refused to meet their pay demands.

Page 5: A Liberal-National senator has implored colleagues to convince Christopher Pyne and Julie Bishop to quit controversial private sector jobs, arguing their post-parliamentary careers were damning the government.

The federal government has flatly rejected a proposal to abolish Medicare and make private health insurance compulsory, saying it was committed to taxpayer-funded universal healthcare.

Page 13: Only 23 companies joined the Australian Securities Exchange in the first six months of 2019, barely half the five-year average, but the group that did list has trounced the performance of the broader All Ordinaries Index.

Rio Tinto is on track to become the world’s biggest iron ore exporter in 2019 after trouble-prone Brazilian miner Vale revealed weaker than expected exports over the past three months.

Page 15: Woolworths is rolling out a new digital billboard advertising network across its supermarkets, liquor stores BWS and Dan Murphy’s, and retailer Big W as part of the retail giant’s overall shake-up to capitalise on its assets and partner with other businesses looking to tap into its scale.

Page 16: Australia’s banks will have to pay an extra $30 million a year for a crucial Reserve Bank of Australia insurance that ensures they can access funds to repay depositors in the event of a run.

Page 31: Woolworths has sold a self-anchored shopping centre in Perth’s north east to a private Asia-based investor for about $27.3 million.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Chinese-born Australian MP Gladys Liu has asked chief spy Duncan Lewis whether ASIO could vet anyone requesting her for face-to-face meetings.

Page 4: More than $65 million in legal fees and fines have been levied against the country’s most militant union over the past 15 years and paid for largely out of workers’ membership dues, according to government analysis.

Page 17: The global dependence on fossil fuels poses a potentially “existential” risk to the planet, according to BHP chief executive Andrew Mackenzie, and climate change is escalating towards crisis point.

One of the nation’s top corporate strategists has a clear message for company directors under ever increasing pressure from tighter regulation and scrutiny: never, ever stop asking questions, even the dumb ones.

Page 19: Nervous consultants fear a slowing economy and fraying ties with China will wreck record-breaking growth in spending on consulting firms by governments and banks, which exceeded $US2.3 billion ($3.3bn) for the first time last year.

Uber rival Ola is looking to break the US ride-sharing giant’s stranglehold in the Australian market by letting passengers earn frequent flyer points.

Plans by Qantas and Cathay Pacific to codeshare on certain flights on the Hong Kong route have been blocked by the International Air Services Commission, which found the arrangement could lead to higher prices for passengers.

Page 20: Santos has set its sights on exporting a growing share of its big West Australian gas production base through the state’s existing liquefied natural gas plants, as chief executive Kevin Gallagher warns that greater access to international markets will be crucial if WA is to avoid a gas price spike in coming years.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Incoming British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wasted no time in telling a deeply divided nation last night that he would achieve what his predecessor had been unable — “get Brexit done”.

Page 7: A finals-bound Perth junior football team has been stripped of its shot at premiership glory all because they are too good — joining two other junior sides that have been slapped with the same heavy penalty this year.

Page 10: WA Olympians and Paralympians will be individually funded by taxpayers for the first time in a new $4000 pledge from the State Government for athletes selected to compete at next year’s Tokyo Games.

Page 11: WA motorists are paying more to own their cars than last year, according to an RAC survey.

Page 18: Taxpayers will lend $120 million to fund solar panels, special light globes and insulation among other emissions reduction measures for Curtin University’s new student lodgings in a move blasted as a “gross misuse of public money”.

Page 19: Lawbreaking by unions in WA is estimated to have cost workers more than $12 million over the past 15 years.

Business: Elusive former Kalgoorlie electrician Kenneth Hall holds the whip hand in what is expected to be a looming $300 million-plus battle for control of mine-site power station provider Pacific Energy.

Australians are still reluctant to splash out on retail and cars despite tax cuts and lower interest rates, with new data showing spending intentions are weak.

The State Government will receive a barrage of objections from Kimberley pastoralists arguing there are flaws in how their rent increases — some as high as 500 per cent — have been determined.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options