15/07/2019 - 06:42

Morning Headlines

15/07/2019 - 06:42

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Morning Headlines

Mining wages hit boom-time highs

Wages for certain mining jobs have soared beyond boom-time levels and some workers will enjoy an extended period of premium wages amid a quadruple squeeze on skills. The Fin

Perth miner wins $8.3b Pakistan case

An eight-year legal fight over an old BHP copper discovery culminated on Saturday when a World Bank tribunal ruled that Pakistan must pay Tethyan Copper Company Pty Ltd damages worth $US5.84 billion ($8.3 billion). The Fin

‘Extreme’ price gap flags issues ahead in LNG

Woodside Petroleum, Oil Search and Santos are facing what some say is the biggest ever threat to their liquefied natural gas export revenues, as the patience of their customers in Asia for paying above-market prices runs out. The Fin

Rio’s WA copper prospect may hit production before Resolution

Rio Tinto’s Australian copper discovery could be developed sooner than its Resolution Copper joint venture with BHP, with drilling results expected by the end of the year to determine how Rio will further develop the project. The Fin

'Fix crisis' in building industry

Five of Australia’s largest business groups are demanding urgent federal government intervention to push reform of the building industry, warning that a flawed regime of state regulations and skyrocketing insurance premiums pose a threat to the national economy. The Aus

Pressure on deeming if interest rate gets cut

Seniors are worried they stand to lose again if the Reserve Bank cuts interest rates again, after the government announced a $150 million annual boost to pensions to supplement weaker returns from record-low interest rates. The Fin

Two million people already on 12pc super

Nearly 2 million workers already enjoy superannuation contribution rates of 12 per cent or more, according to Industry Super Australia analysis based on latest tax data. The Fin

BHP calls for LNG-powered iron ore vessels

BHP has challenged vessel manufacturers to make a ‘‘step change’’ towards lower pollution, saying it will favour providers that can deliver reduced carbon, sulphur and nitrous oxide emissions in a tender for the right to carry about 10 per cent of its iron ore exports to China. The Fin

Health insurer sick of coughing up so much in hospital payments

Health insurer HBF is set to play hard-ball in its hospital contract negotiations, saying it is paying almost 10 per cent more to Western Australian hospitals than its rivals, putting pressure on members’ premiums. The Aus

Mothers suffer in silence

Australia has a “long way to go” when it comes to supporting women who have experienced physical trauma in childbirth, according to leading WA obstetrician Michael Gannon. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Wages for certain mining jobs have soared beyond boom-time levels and some workers will enjoy an extended period of premium wages amid a quadruple squeeze on skills.

Pessimistic views on the economy are misguided because there was ‘‘heaps of stimulus’’ in the pipeline from the Morrison government’s income tax cuts and the Reserve Bank’s two interest rate cuts.

Page 3: Indigenous Affairs Minister Ken Wyatt has ‘‘every reason to be outraged’’ by how Scott Morrison has treated his push for constitutional recognition of First Nations peoples, deputy Labor leader Richard Marles said.

Page 4: Seniors are worried they stand to lose again if the Reserve Bank cuts interest rates again, after the government announced a $150 million annual boost to pensions to supplement weaker returns from record-low interest rates.

Page 5: Nearly 2 million workers already enjoy superannuation contribution rates of 12 per cent or more, according to Industry Super Australia analysis based on latest tax data.

Page 8: US President Donald Trump will use a rare state-level dinner for Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the White House to consolidate support for the administration’s push back against China, according to Washington foreign policy experts.

Page 9: Australia’s most popular cars emit between 8 and 42 per cent more carbon dioxide than their UK counterparts, raising concerns that the country has become a parking lot for dirty vehicles.

Page 14: Woodside Petroleum, Oil Search and Santos are facing what some say is the biggest ever threat to their liquefied natural gas export revenues, as the patience of their customers in Asia for paying above-market prices runs out.

Page 16: Rio Tinto’s Australian copper discovery could be developed sooner than its Resolution Copper joint venture with BHP, with drilling results expected by the end of the year to determine how Rio will further develop the project.

An eight-year legal fight over an old BHP copper discovery culminated on Saturday when a World Bank tribunal ruled that Pakistan must pay Tethyan Copper Company Pty Ltd damages worth $US5.84 billion ($8.3 billion).

Page 18: BHP has challenged vessel manufacturers to make a ‘‘step change’’ towards lower pollution, saying it will favour providers that can deliver reduced carbon, sulphur and nitrous oxide emissions in a tender for the right to carry about 10 per cent of its iron ore exports to China.

Page 19: Mining executives might get the big bucks, but a new report has found that junior staff deliver a lot more bang for investors when it comes to innovation in the sector.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Five of Australia’s largest business groups are demanding urgent federal government intervention to push reform of the building industry, warning that a flawed regime of state regulations and skyrocketing insurance premiums pose a threat to the national economy.

Page 4: Pauline Hanson and the Greens will sit together on a Labor-initiated inquiry into the Morrison government’s northern Australia agenda, sparking a brawl with the Top End’s federal minister, Matthew Canavan.

Page 6: The incoming government brief for Defence has been seized on by the Centre Alliance party to question whether Australia will have the manpower and expertise to operate its future navy when a $90 billion upgrade is completed.

Page 17: Australia has received an unintended boost from the global trade war, helping to cushion the domestic economy from a fall in business and housing investment.

Health insurer HBF is set to play hard-ball in its hospital contract negotiations, saying it is paying almost 10 per cent more to Western Australian hospitals than its rivals, putting pressure on members’ premiums.

Page 20: Amazon filed an application with the American authorities last week to launch a constellation of 3200 satellites to beam high-speed broadband to areas deprived of good internet services.

Page 22: Global brewing giant Anheuser-Busch InBev called off the near $US10 billion ($14.2bn) listing of its Asian business, citing market conditions, scrapping what would have been the largest initial public offering of the year and dealing a setback to its efforts to pay down debt.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Regardless of the outcome of the voluntary assisted dying Bill, State Health Minister Roger Cook said he wants all West Australians to be able to get quality palliative care.

Page 7: Meaningful recovery for Perth property prices remains “way off”, with experts predicting rises after 2021-22.

Page 15: Treasurer Josh Frydenberg says the Federal Government does not support calls for the income tests for pensioners to be set by an independent body.

New minimum requirements for newborn photography are set to be introduced by the end of the year, in light of concerns around the dangers associated with untrained photographers handling babies.

Page 19: Taxpayer money is being used to help university students travel to North Korea despite the Government warning Australians not to visit the region and the country’s history of detaining Westerners.

Page 21: Australia has a “long way to go” when it comes to supporting women who have experienced physical trauma in childbirth, according to leading WA obstetrician Michael Gannon.

Business: Failed WA biodiesel player Mission NewEnergy will look to reinvent itself as a Kwinana-based battery chemicals maker via a reverse takeover of Pilbara Metals Group.

Vimy Resources boss Mike Young says a decision by US President Donald Trump at the weekend not to impose trade restrictions on uranium imports is a big win for aspiring WA producers of the commodity.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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