27/06/2019 - 07:02

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27/06/2019 - 07:02

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Coalition to reshape workplace landscape

The Morrison government will investigate changes to unfair dismissal laws, a new definition of casual employment, improvements to enterprise agreement approvals, long-term workplace deals on major projects and a new federal building code as part of its review of the nation’s workplace system. The Aus

Final act: ‘Call the G-G’

The day before Malcolm Turnbull was deposed, the prime minister clashed with Attorney-General Christian Porter over a last-ditch plan to save his leadership by persuading Governor-General Peter Cosgrove not to commission Peter Dutton as prime minister. The Aus

AMP faces new class action

AMP says it will vigorously defend itself against a fresh class action suit alleging more than two million investors were gouged for excessive fees on their super accounts. The West

‘Accept your responsibility’: companies told to put disabled to work

NDIS Minister Stuart Robert has called on big companies to “accept their responsibility” and employ more people with a disability, as he prepares to unveil a new funding package to end a stoush with the states. The Aus

Indonesia’s trade war pushback

A coalition of nations led by Indonesia with Australia’s backing is working to stop the United States and China’s trade fight derailing the push for broader reform of world trade rules at the G20, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison securing an early face-to-face meeting with US President Donald Trump to try keep negotiations on track. The Fin

Security laws used to avoid scrutiny, say media bosses

A trio of Australia’s most powerful media executives has warned overly aggressive national security and defamation laws are making it more expensive and riskier for journalists and whistleblowers to expose wrongdoing. The Fin

Rates relief as councils cave to tough times

Four Perth councils have cut proposed rate increases to try to provide relief for ratepayers in tough economic times. Ratepayers in the Town of Victoria Park and the cities of South Perth and Vincent were in line for greater hikes this week, but the councils passed motions to reduce the burden on families. The West

ASIC to begin wielding its product-banning powers in August

The corporate regulator is expected to ban its first toxic financial product in August, after being granted additional powers by the federal government. The Fin

Woolworths expands checkout-free trial

Australia’s largest retailer is expanding a trial of its ‘‘scan and go’’ technology, which allows customers to scan products with their smartphones as they shop and pay through an app linked to their credit cards.

Safeguards for right-to-die laws

Terminally ill people will need to get the support of two witnesses who can prove they stand to make no financial gain from the patient’s death under WA’s incoming euthanasia laws. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: A coalition of nations led by Indonesia with Australia’s backing is working to stop the United States and China’s trade fight derailing the push for broader reform of world trade rules at the G20, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison securing an early face-to-face meeting with US President Donald Trump to try keep negotiations on track.

Page 3: The federal government will terminate Paladin’s $423 million contract after Papua New Guinea said it would take over the provision of refugee services on Manus Island, ending months of controversy for Home Affairs.

Page 5: A trio of Australia’s most powerful media executives has warned overly aggressive national security and defamation laws are making it more expensive and riskier for journalists and whistleblowers to expose wrongdoing.

Page 8: One of Australia’s biggest gas consumers says export curbs could be the solution to the ‘‘abysmal’’ state of the domestic gas market, and no further export licences should be awarded until consumers on the east coast are adequately supplied.

Page 13: Facebook’s fledgling cryptocurrency faced further scrutiny this week as European central bankers and regulators demanded more detail on its Libra project.

Page 16: Fletcher Building chief executive Ross Taylor says the Australian housing construction market won’t begin to recover until 2020-21, and more cuts in interest rates are unlikely to drive a quicker rebound.

The corporate regulator is expected to ban its first toxic financial product in August, after being granted additional powers by the federal government.

Page 18: A class action claim against Domino’s Pizza Enterprises by delivery drivers and store staff could cost Australia’s largest pizza chain as much as $240 million, according to Citigroup.

Rio Tinto chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques’ drive to attract ‘‘ethical’’ investors back to the mining company has received a boost, with the Norwegian sovereign wealth fund scrapping its decade-long ban on investing in Rio.

Page 19: Shares in Afterpay surged by more than 5.5 per cent on Wednesday after the company said it was taking the audit of its money laundering controls seriously while its founders committed to not sell any more shares until the end of the following financial year.

Page 22: Australia’s largest retailer is expanding a trial of its ‘‘scan and go’’ technology, which allows customers to scan products with their smartphones as they shop and pay through an app linked to their credit cards.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The day before Malcolm Turnbull was deposed, the prime minister clashed with Attorney-General Christian Porter over a last-ditch plan to save his leadership by persuading Governor-General Peter Cosgrove not to commission Peter Dutton as prime minister.

Page 2: The president of the Australia China Business Council, John Brumby, has urged the government to engage with China’s Belt and Road initiative, saying it could provide a “great prize” of more jobs and investment.

Page 4: NDIS Minister Stuart Robert has called on big companies to “accept their responsibility” and employ more people with a disability, as he prepares to unveil a new funding package to end a stoush with the states.

The Morrison government will investigate changes to unfair dismissal laws, a new definition of casual employment, improvements to enterprise agreement approvals, long-term workplace deals on major projects and a new federal building code as part of its review of the nation’s workplace system.

Page 8: Donald Trump has vowed to strike Iran with “overwhelming force” if it launches another attack on “anything American” as tensions spiked further between the two nations.

Page 17: The major banks are quietly manoeuvring to up their game in digital banking, hoping to fend off the risk of losing billions in revenue to technology giants and niche players that aim to chip away at their market share.

Page 20: A second law firm has filed a class action against financial services giant AMP on behalf of superannuation fund members who were allegedly charged unreasonable fees.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Almost twice as many pedestrians have died on WA roads so far this year compared with the same time last year, with fears incessant mobile phone use is driving the fatal trend upward.

Page 4: Fremantle’s balloon ban could be only months away with the council voting last night for the potential environmental hazard to be prohibited in the port city.

Page 7: Terminally ill people will need to get the support of two witnesses who can prove they stand to make no financial gain from the patient’s death under WA’s incoming euthanasia laws.

Four Perth councils have cut proposed rate increases to try to provide relief for ratepayers in tough economic times. Ratepayers in the Town of Victoria Park and the cities of South Perth and Vincent were in line for greater hikes this week, but the councils passed motions to reduce the burden on families.

Page 8: A militant WA union boss and his members have thrown their support behind John Setka hours after the Victorian CFMMEU secretary was blasted by a judge for sending “nasty and misogynistic” texts to his wife and fined $1000.

Page 9: Premier Mark McGowan has opened the door to a blanket ban on mobile phones in WA classrooms after Victoria revealed it would enforce a ban from next year.

Page 18: The holiday hotspot of Broome would be the ideal Australian destination to compete with international destinations such as Hong Kong and Bali in the Singaporean market, according to leading travel agents.

Page 20: India is the “sleeping giant” of Australia’s tourism future and WA is poised to be a major player in a massive increase in the number of visitors from the subcontinent, tourism chiefs say.

Business: AMP says it will vigorously defend itself against a fresh class action suit alleging more than two million investors were gouged for excessive fees on their super accounts.

Shares in Galaxy Resources could come under further selling pressure today after the battered lithium miner yesterday advised a shipment of 15,000t of Mt Cattlin spodumene set to leave Esperance this month would be delayed until next month.

Two of Perth’s most established immigration law firms are to merge, creating one of the biggest organisations of its type in WA.

A new range of WA-grown lupin–based snack foods is expected to hit Australian shelves later this year after being launched at a food expo in Thailand last month.

The Chinese owners of a Kimberley pastoral lease may face prosecution and could have to re-establish native vegetation on a 120ha area it allegedly cleared without a permit.

Hastings Technology Metals has received the go-ahead for its $427 million Yangibana rare earths project in the Gascoyne region from the Environmental Protection Authority.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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