06/06/2019 - 06:42

Morning Headlines

06/06/2019 - 06:42

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Resources boom will be powered by India: RBA

The fast-growing Indian middle class will help ensure Australia’s resource industry continues to grow for decades to come, according to the Reserve Bank of Australia. The Fin

Belt and Road Initiative ‘ideal fit for the west’

China is pushing for Western Australia to join Victoria in signing up to President Xi Jinping’s controversial Belt and Road Initiative, with a senior official urging the McGowan government to seize the “historical opportunity” of a deal aimed at boosting trade and investment links. The Aus

WA: We won’t budge on Lynas waste

The West Australian government has signalled that one of Lynas Corporation’s fiercest opponents in Malaysian politics will be wasting her time with a visit to Perth. The Fin

WA in a ship fight with SA

The McGowan Government is pressing Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s new WA-based Defence Minister Linda Reynolds to shower the State with billions of dollars in military contracts, arguing South Australia had more than its fill under former defence minister Christopher Pyne. The West

Soft economy sparks growth row

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has rejected calls by the Reserve Bank and business for broad-scale policy reform and has instead dialled up the pressure on Labor to pass his income tax cuts, saying these are essential to kickstart a lacklustre economy. The Fin

Growth propped up by spending, trade

Easing consumption, falling dwelling investment and drought dragged down Australia’s economic growth to just 0.4 per cent in the March quarter, with big government spending and higher terms of trade the key supports for the economy. The Fin

Drought-stricken farmers sent threatening water bill letters

The Water Corporation has been accused of going too far by threatening to refer farmers with overdue water bills to the RSPCA. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has rejected calls by the Reserve Bank and business for broad-scale policy reform and has instead dialled up the pressure on Labor to pass his income tax cuts, saying these are essential to kickstart a lacklustre economy.

Page 2: The $32 billion international student market is producing graduates who have the wrong idea about the skills employers want.

Page 3: One of the navy’s flagship frigates has been dry docked for two years because the Defence Department cannot find enough people to crew it, with a new report revealing the military is failing to meet recruitment targets.

Page 4: Easing consumption, falling dwelling investment and drought dragged down Australia’s economic growth to just 0.4 per cent in the March quarter, with big government spending and higher terms of trade the key supports for the economy.

Page 5: The fast-growing Indian middle class will help ensure Australia’s resource industry continues to grow for decades to come, according to the Reserve Bank of Australia.

Page 11: Donald Trump has promised Britain a ‘‘phenomenal’’ post-Brexit trade deal as he dismissed differences over China’s Huawei and said he’s keen on Boris Johnson as a successor to Prime Minister Theresa May.

Page 15: The West Australian government has signalled that one of Lynas Corporation’s fiercest opponents in Malaysian politics will be wasting her time with a visit to Perth.

Wesfarmers has moved to boost the resources expertise on its board with the addition of Fortescue Metals Group director Sharon Warburton.

Page 16: Nine chief executive Hugh Marks believes Facebook, Google and Twitter are unlikely to battle free-to-air and pay TV in the next round of major sports rights negotiations, such as the AFL and NRL.

Page 19: Family-owned online retailer Hobby Warehouse expects sales to double and triple over the next few years after acquiring licensing rights for the Toys R Us and Babies R Us brands.

Page 27: The US and China are heading for a stand-off over critical minerals used in everything from washing machines to military hardware.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A political row has erupted over national security and press freedom following two police raids on media outlets on consecutive days, with the ABC targeted yesterday over its 2017 investigation into the conduct of special forces.

Page 2: Prominent economists have called for bold reforms to stimulate the economy — including cutting personal and corporate tax rates and broadening the base of the GST — as Josh Frydenberg plays down the need for the government to embark on structural policy changes to increase employment and business investment.

Page 4: Australia is not given sufficient credit internationally for the carbon dioxide savings it helps other nations achieve, Energy Minister Angus Taylor says.

The beef industry claims to be on track to meet ambitious targets to reduce carbon emissions and asserts that, far from clearing land, it has actually increased vegetation cover.

Page 8: China is pushing for Western Australia to join Victoria in signing up to President Xi Jinping’s controversial Belt and Road Initiative, with a senior official urging the McGowan government to seize the “historical opportunity” of a deal aimed at boosting trade and investment links.

Page 18: Swedish private equity group EQT may have been quick to drop its pursuit of Vocus Group but the telco is still firmly on the takeover radar, with both management and market watchers confident of future overtures.

Page 19: The reputation of Western Australia’s mid-tier gold sector has taken another hit after shares in one-time market darling Dacian Gold cratered yesterday following its second production downgrade in as many months.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 6: Australia’s top banking advocate has defended two of the big lenders that failed to pass on this week’s interest rate cut to customers in full.

Page 10: The head of the State’s peak medical group says the reported death of a teenage girl in The Netherlands, who it is claimed was allowed to end her own life after being raped, shows WA could be on a “slippery slope” if assisted suicide is legalised.

Page 15: It was dubbed the “Aussie flu”, and now the influenza strain that wreaked havoc in the northern hemisphere and Eastern States two years ago has hit WA, triggering a rapid rise in serious flu cases.

Page 16: A push to change Australia’s national anthem gathered momentum last night as indigenous rugby league players staged a silent protest during State of Origin.

Page 17: The McGowan Government is pressing Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s new WA-based Defence Minister Linda Reynolds to shower the State with billions of dollars in military contracts, arguing South Australia had more than its fill under former defence minister Christopher Pyne.

Page 18: Perth has one of the most affordable housing markets of any capital city in Australia, with an average Perth resident needing only about seven years to save a 20 per cent deposit for a property purchase.

Business: The Water Corporation has been accused of going too far by threatening to refer farmers with overdue water bills to the RSPCA.

Shell’s giant Prelude floating LNG facility is close to exporting its first LNG almost two years after arriving in Australian waters in which it has had several problems bringing vessels alongside.

Former WA undertreasurer Tim Marney has joined management consultancy Nous Group as a principal, following five years as WA’s mental health commissioner.

Gascoyne Resources power provider Zenith Energy has estimated the gold miner’s collapse could shave up to $2 million from its annual earnings.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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