06/05/2019 - 07:02

Morning Headlines

06/05/2019 - 07:02

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Morning Headlines

WA rules out Lynas waste imports

Western Australian mines Minister Bill Johnston has slammed the door shut on the possible import of radioactive waste into the state, further complicating efforts by both rare earths producer Lynas Corp and its suitor Wesfarmers to sort out an impasse with the Malaysian government. The Aus

Forrests gift $655m extra, and challenge Asia’s rich

Andrew and Nicola Forrest will reveal a $655 million rise in their donations during a visit to Singapore today, using their personal example to encourage the growth of major philanthropy in Asia.

Argyle revenues soar to a decade high with mine closure imminent

Rio Tinto’s fading Argyle diamond mine looks set to go out on a high, after posting its best financial performance in years. The Fin

Labor clings to winning lead

Labor’s lead has narrowed slightly since the start of the election campaign but with two weeks until polling day, it remains comfortably ahead of the Coalition while Bill Shorten’s personal ratings have improved significantly. The Fin

Uber in ALP’s sights in tax crackdown

Foreign multinationals like Uber are in the crosshairs of Labor’s policy to crack down on what it says are loopholes allowing the funnelling of intellectual property royalties to low-tax jurisdictions, a move that could save taxpayers about $2.3 billion over the next 10 years. The Fin

Wyatt call for bank buffer cut

State Treasurer Ben Wyatt has backed ANZ Bank’s call for an easing of east coast-focused lending restrictions he says are holding back WA’s property market. The West

Bill’s ‘fair go’ wealth transfer

Bill Shorten has pinned his election hopes on “fair go economics”, promising another $841 million yesterday in health spending and small business tax incentives while pledging to deliver a living wage within the first 100 days of a Labor government. The Aus

Chinese deal puts Palmer in poll position

Clive Palmer’s extraordinary $50 million election campaign spending is being bankrolled by a WA mining deal with a Chinese company that could be earning him a million dollars a day. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Labor’s lead has narrowed slightly since the start of the election campaign but with two weeks until polling day, it remains comfortably ahead of the Coalition while Bill Shorten’s personal ratings have improved significantly.

Andrew and Nicola Forrest will reveal a $655 million rise in their donations during a visit to Singapore today, using their personal example to encourage the growth of major philanthropy in Asia.

Page 3: The Reserve Bank of Australia should leave rates on hold on Tuesday given the depreciating currency, signs of growth in the domestic economy and the improving US outlook.

Page 6: Foreign multinationals like Uber are in the crosshairs of Labor’s policy to crack down on what it says are loopholes allowing the funnelling of intellectual property royalties to low-tax jurisdictions, a move that could save taxpayers about $2.3 billion over the next 10 years.

Page 8: The Morrison government has forcefully intervened against casual workers ‘‘double dipping’’ on their entitlements in a last-ditch appeal to prevent employers from being held liable for billions of dollars in back pay.

Page 14: Labor will look for measurable results and other indications that money has been ‘‘well spent’’ when it pumps an extra $14.1 billion into public schools in the next 10 years, if elected to government.

Page 15: Westpac won’t cut its interim dividend despite a growing bill for customer refunds, but investors and analysts will be looking anxiously at half-year results on Monday for signs of further pressure on the bank’s local revenue and earnings.

Page 17: Analysts and consumer advocates believe an overwhelming case has been made for a merger between TPG Telecom and Vodafone Hutchison Australia, and warn a decision to block the deal could lead to court action.

Page 18: Rio Tinto’s fading Argyle diamond mine looks set to go out on a high, after posting its best financial performance in years.

Page 20: Car dealership group AP Eagers has told the competition regulator the real power in the vehicle retailing industry lies with the car makers and their remuneration models.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Bill Shorten has pinned his election hopes on “fair go economics”, promising another $841 million yesterday in health spending and small business tax incentives while pledging to deliver a living wage within the first 100 days of a Labor government.

Page 6: Liberal state divisions will toughen up candidate vetting processes after the May 18 election, as Josh Frydenberg indicates procedures that allowed people with extremist views to nominate for the party will be reviewed.

The decorated former police superintendent aiming to win the knife-edge seat of Pearce for Labor says she won’t team up with left-wing activist group GetUp in her bid to unseat Attorney-General Christian Porter.

Page 17: Western Australian mines Minister Bill Johnston has slammed the door shut on the possible import of radioactive waste into the state, further complicating efforts by both rare earths producer Lynas Corp and its suitor Wesfarmers to sort out an impasse with the Malaysian government.

Westpac chairman Lindsay Maxsted has hinted the bank is prepared to cut director fees to appease investors aggrieved about its pay policies, saying “all options are on the table” as the board looks to avoid an embarrassing second strike against its remuneration report.

Page 18: Mining giant Rio Tinto has launched legal action against one of its key North American competitors, accusing Century Aluminium of patent infringement.

Woodside Petroleum is understood to have hired investment bank Morgan Stanley for the selldown of the $33 billion energy giant’s stake in the Scarborough gas field.

Page 19: The privately owned Chemist Warehouse group is stepping up its sales of Australian consumer goods to China, pitching itself to a growing number of brands as the gateway to an increasingly affluent middle class, as Beijing tightens controls on informal ecommerce channels.

Page 24: SBS is set to flood the market with one of its better-known features — world movies — with a new dedicated digital channel that will also provide new revenue opportunities.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Polling for The West Australian has found voters in the marginal WA seats of Pearce, Cowan and Swan have little desire for Australia to become a republic.

Page 5: Prime Minister Scott Morrison will today pivot towards the manufacturing sector in an attempt to build support among blue-collar workers.

Page 7: Clive Palmer’s extraordinary $50 million election campaign spending is being bankrolled by a WA mining deal with a Chinese company that could be earning him a million dollars a day.

Page 14: Public sector unions are gearing up for a fight against the McGowan Government’s hardline wages policy in a major challenge to Treasurer Ben Wyatt’s plans to keep spending under control.

Page 15: WA online entrepreneur Matthew McPhee — who is being chased by American authorities for $445 million they say his company made by ripping off consumers across the world — is fighting back against the mammoth court action against him.

Business: State Treasurer Ben Wyatt has backed ANZ Bank’s call for an easing of east coast-focused lending restrictions he says are holding back WA’s property market.

Perth-based Alterra plans to make its first transaction within six months, as the ASX company repositions itself to capture strong institutional investor demand for WA agriculture.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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