30/04/2019 - 06:55

Morning Headlines

30/04/2019 - 06:55

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Morning Headlines

Feisty debate sets election race alight

Bill Shorten has acknowledged some voters will be unhappy with Labor’s tax agenda but said ‘‘there was a mood for change in Australia’’ and closing ‘‘tax loopholes’’ was essential to guarantee equality and essential services. The Fin

Yara plant equipment bill to soar

Yara’s trouble-plagued Pilbara explosives plant needs to replace about $340 million of equipment to restart production, according to information from co-owner Orica. The West

Miners sharpen up with Razorlabs

WA’s big miners are turning to a leading-edge Israeli start-up company as they seek to harness the power of artificial intelligence to create the mines of the future. The West

Palmer blasts Shorten: ‘He is unfit to be PM’

Mining magnate Clive Palmer has labelled Bill Shorten a two-faced liar and unfit to be prime minister, claiming the Opposition Leader’s attacks on him left the United Australia Party with no option but to strike a preference deal with the Coalition. The Fin

Resurgent Caterpillar gives Stokes’ Seven Group result legs

Kerry Stokes’s Seven Group Holdings is set for a good day after the company flagged a strong second half to the year, saying an expected dip in activity in its core WesTrac business did not appear to be happening. The Aus

Coles puts more eggs in convenience basket

Coles plans to stock more ready-to-eat meals and change store layouts so customers can shop for their evening meal faster, in an attempt to boost sales to shoppers demanding more convenience. The Fin

Housing price declines slowing

Green shoots may be appearing in the housing market, with signs that credit is loosening as the national house prices decline slowed in April, according to preliminary monthly data from property researcher CoreLogic. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Bill Shorten has acknowledged some voters will be unhappy with Labor’s tax agenda but said ‘‘there was a mood for change in Australia’’ and closing ‘‘tax loopholes’’ was essential to guarantee equality and essential services.

Page 3: Renowned US competition lawyer Howard Shelanski has pushed back against moves by regulators to treat Facebook and Google as publishers, saying any laws dictating how the tech giants display content or refer users to news sites would be overreaching.

Page 5: Mining magnate Clive Palmer has labelled Bill Shorten a two-faced liar and unfit to be prime minister, claiming the Opposition Leader’s attacks on him left the United Australia Party with no option but to strike a preference deal with the Coalition.

Page 8: When Bill Shorten campaigns in Western Australia, his signature ‘‘Bill Bus’’ travels around the state adorned with images of Premier Mark McGowan alongside the Opposition Leader.

Labor has pledged to make up to $1 billion in finance available to boost solar power in Australian schools, improving access to rooftop panels and battery storage.

Page 10: The Australian election is being targeted by fake Twitter accounts run by bots, according to leading digital media experts.

Page 12: Anadarko Petroleum, the US oil and gas exploration and production company that agreed this month to sell itself to Chevron for $US33 billion ($46.8 billion), decided on Monday (AEST) to begin negotiations to sell itself to Occidental Petroleum instead, according to people familiar with the matter.

Page 14: Coles plans to stock more ready-to-eat meals and change store layouts so customers can shop for their evening meal faster, in an attempt to boost sales to shoppers demanding more convenience.

The Andrew Forrest-backed Port Kembla LNG import terminal in NSW is facing its biggest test, with domestic gas customers to be asked to ink long-term purchase deals within the next six weeks now that the project has won planning approval from the state government.

Page 17: Eleven early adopters of the ASX’s planned equities blockchain will begin testing the new technology from Tuesday, when the exchange switches on a test site that allows them real-time access to its data store.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Bill Shorten has conceded for the first time that it is not possible to put a single price on the cost of his emissions-reduction targets, while claiming he has accepted the lessons of the former Labor government’s border protection failures.

Page 2: Green shoots may be appearing in the housing market, with signs that credit is loosening as the national house prices decline slowed in April, according to preliminary monthly data from property researcher CoreLogic.

Page 5: Australia’s three largest aged-care groups have demanded Bill Shorten extend his $10 billion pitch to fund childcare pay rises to nursing home staff — a move that would cost up to another $30bn over the decade.

Page 10: Spain’s governing centre-left Socialists will seek backing from smaller parties to maintain power after winning the weekend’s general election in which a far right party entered the lower house of parliament for the first time in four decades.

Page 17: Coles will face pressure to introduce new collectable promotions such as its highly successful Little Shop and Stikeez campaigns to bolster sales growth, with the marketing tools proving a boon for customer traffic at a time when the supermarkets are doggedly fighting for sales.

The new chief executive of Nestle Australia, Sandra Martinez, says she is surprised by the soaring cost of energy in Australia, with utility bills even steeper than in Switzerland where she had recently been working at the global confectionary and coffee giant’s headquarters.

Page 19: India and the chemicals industry are the key to organic growth for newly enlarged Worley, but chief executive Andrew Wood has flagged an ambition for further acquisitions when the integration of its Jacobs Engineering Group businesses are bedded down.

Page 20: Kerry Stokes’s Seven Group Holdings is set for a good day after the company flagged a strong second half to the year, saying an expected dip in activity in its core WesTrac business did not appear to be happening.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The City of Perth is expected tonight to approve a change that would force motorists to “yield” to pedestrians in a 20km/h zone on Hay Street in the block between Pier and Hay streets.

Page 8: Labor yesterday denied offering Clive Palmer a preference deal, despite his claims they have courted him since 2013.

Woolworths has been crowned the nation’s healthiest major supermarket for home-brand products, according to a new health report.

Business: Pioneer Credit founder Keith John has highlighted the debt management company’s financial credentials as it juggles a rash of interest from suitors looking to capitalise on the group’s share price slump.

WA’s big miners are turning to a leading-edge Israeli start-up company as they seek to harness the power of artificial intelligence to create the mines of the future.

A Supreme Court justice has queried a loan scheme at the heart of a lawsuit by recapitalised sandalwood company Quintis against its former chief executive Frank Wilson.

Yara’s trouble-plagued Pilbara explosives plant needs to replace about $340 million of equipment to restart production, according to information from co-owner Orica.

Online jobs listing giant Seek says it is investing $142 million in major internet learning platforms Coursera and Future-Learn.

The managing director of Tempo Australia has quit as the contracting company probes a potential cost blowout at one of its projects.

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