26/04/2019 - 06:38

Morning Headlines

26/04/2019 - 06:38

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Morning Headlines

Coalition go-ahead for giant U-mine

Environment Minister Melissa Price signed off on one of Western Australia’s most contentious mining projects the day before Scott Morrison called the federal election, setting up a showdown with anti-nuclear and environmental campaigners. The Aus

Treasurer rules out tackling gold again

The McGowan Government has officially abandoned plans to hit up the WA gold sector for cash again ahead of next month’s State Budget. The West

Worley drops Parsons after $4.6b takeover

WorleyParsons boss Andrew Wood says the company will become a ‘‘change agent’’ for the energy industry as it closes its $4.6 billion acquisition of the Jacobs Engineering Group’s energy, resources and chemicals business. The Fin

Electric cars lift nickel mines

Moves by global carmakers to avoid Congo as a source of cobalt for electric vehicles could help underpin the revival of Australia’s nickel mines, as First Quantum Minerals mulls the reopening of its Ravensthorpe operations in Western Australia. The Aus

Shorten’s pledge to business

Bill Shorten has told a restive business sector that a Labor government would work with it but not for it. But neither, he said, would it be beholden to the trade union movement. The Fin

Luxury beauty brands see red over Amazon

Global beauty companies Chanel and L’Oreal – which owns Lancome, Giorgio Armani, YSL, Shu Uemera, Kiehl’s and Urban Decay – are fuming after Amazon started to sell luxury beauty products on its Australian site this month. The Fin

Regions get jobs carrot for young

Prime Minister Scott Morrison is promising to pour $60 million of new funding to make apprenticeships cheaper for small business and create jobs for about 3200 young Australians in rural and regional areas. The West

Fortescue faces franking hit

Fortescue Metals Group, Caltex Australia, Harvey Norman, JB Hi-Fi, Bendigo and Adelaide Bank are the companies most exposed to possible changes to rules on franking credits, analysis shows. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Bill Shorten has told a restive business sector that a Labor government would work with it but not for it. But neither, he said, would it be beholden to the trade union movement.

Page 4: A dwindling group of economists said the Reserve Bank of Australia would not cut interest rates during the election campaign, saying employment and wages could still improve and tax cuts would better stimulate spending.

Page 5: Leading economists Warwick McKibbin and Peter Downes said Canberra should use record low government borrowing costs to invest in high return projects to add immediate inflationary pressure to the economy and lift productivity longer term.

Page 17: WorleyParsons boss Andrew Wood says the company will become a ‘‘change agent’’ for the energy industry as it closes its $4.6 billion acquisition of the Jacobs Engineering Group’s energy, resources and chemicals business.

Global beauty companies Chanel and L’Oreal – which owns Lancome, Giorgio Armani, YSL, Shu Uemera, Kiehl’s and Urban Decay – are fuming after Amazon started to sell luxury beauty products on its Australian site this month.

Page 22: Woolworths’ $1.7 billion off-market share buyback is expected to be heavily oversubscribed by retirees and superannuation funds chasing franking credits before mooted changes to the law come into force.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Environment Minister Melissa Price signed off on one of Western Australia’s most contentious mining projects the day before Scott Morrison called the federal election, setting up a showdown with anti-nuclear and environmental campaigners.

Page 4: Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten are locked in a political clash to win tradies’ votes, as the government invests $60 million in a regional apprenticeship scheme aimed at giving a leg-up to an extra 1600 young Australians.

Page 10: Russian President Vladimir Putin and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said yesterday they had good talks about their joint efforts to resolve a standoff over Pyongyang’s nuclear program, amid stalled negotiations with the US.

Page 17: Moves by global carmakers to avoid Congo as a source of cobalt for electric vehicles could help underpin the revival of Australia’s nickel mines, as First Quantum Minerals mulls the reopening of its Ravensthorpe operations in Western Australia.

Facebook founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg has conceded the Silicon Valley tech giants cannot be trusted to write their own rules, as he stepped up calls for global guidelines on harmful content.

Page 19: Global shopping centre giant Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield says it is on track with its European shopping centres performing well despite an unfavourable Easter calendar, with Westfield centres in London among the strongest contributors, despite concerns about the integration of two mall empires.

The chief executive of the Australia China Business Council, Helen Sawczak, has urged Australian companies to look at the business potential of China’s multi-billiondollar Belt and Road initiative, despite the fact that Australia has not signed up to it.

Page 20: Boeing has reported a $US1.1 billion ($1.6bn) decline in revenue for its commercial aircraft division in the first quarter of 2019 due to fewer deliveries of its troubled 737 MAX model.

BHP has clinched top spot as the world’s most valuable mining brand for a second year running, dubbed a standout by Brand Finance in its 2019 rankings for the sector.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Parents should not let children under the age of two have any screen time at all, according to guidelines released by the World Health Organisation.

Page 4: Women and children will be safer under a Labor government according to Bill Shorten, who will today announce record funding to combat domestic and family violence.

The body that runs sport in Australia is pulling out of WA in a move that could undermine the State’s chances of fostering the next Sam Kerr or Nat Fyfe.

Page 5: As he prepares for a showdown with Bill Shorten in Perth’s first Leaders’ Debate on Monday the Prime Minister told The West Australian he would “never underestimate” WA and believed creating more jobs here was crucial to the nation’s overall economic success.

WA Liberals have questioned Scott Morrison’s snub to One Nation on how-to-vote cards, arguing Pauline Hanson’s party should be above Labor and Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison is promising to pour $60 million of new funding to make apprenticeships cheaper for small business and create jobs for about 3200 young Australians in rural and regional areas.

Page 18: Street names and landmarks could be given Noongar names under a proposal contained in the City of Vincent’s new reconciliation action plan, which also suggests staff include an acknowledgement of country before meetings and use Noongar language in email and verbal communication.

Business: The McGowan Government has officially abandoned plans to hit up the WA gold sector for cash again ahead of next month’s State Budget.

New rules that require horticulture companies to pay overtime rates have created major headaches for an industry already facing labour challenges.

Quadrant Energy’s shareholders paid themselves $US200 million in dividends — including a $US6.9 million windfall for executives — before selling the WA oil and gas company to Santos last year.

Fortescue Metals Group, Caltex Australia, Harvey Norman, JB Hi-Fi, Bendigo and Adelaide Bank are the companies most exposed to possible changes to rules on franking credits, analysis shows.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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