18/04/2019 - 06:16

Morning Headlines

18/04/2019 - 06:16

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Talk of Aussie gold’s decline ‘exaggerated’

The company developing WA’s biggest new gold mine — the $621 million Gruyere operation near Laverton — says fears of Australian gold’s decline are exaggerated. The West

Shorten ‘superficial on the detail of policy’, says PM

Scott Morrison has branded Bill Shorten’s gaffe over superannuation taxes a ‘‘Michael Daley moment’’, claiming it reveals the Labor leader’s ‘‘superficial’’ grasp on policy. The Fin

Saracen beats staff drought

Saracen Mineral Holdings boss Raleigh Finlayson says having a growth business is the best defence against an accelerating skilled worker shortage in the WA mining industry. The West

Education crisis as boys fail in writing

Educators say they’re ‘‘stunned’’ by a collapse in the writing ability of boys, with latest national data showing boys in year 9 are more than two years below where they should be and substantially less capable than girls. The Fin

Dulux agrees to Nippon $3.8b takeover

The boss of Australia’s biggest paint maker, Dulux Group, says he wants to keep running the company after Japanese giant Nippon Paint’s agreed $3.8 billion buyout, and claims the core business is largely immune from a housing downturn. The Fin

Causing chaos at election

Foreign countries wanting to use fake news to disrupt the Australian election will not be campaigning for a particular side but rather creating “chaos for chaos’ sake” in an “unprecedented” attempt to undermine democracy, the Attorney-General and intelligence insiders said last night. The West

Evolution coy on Tribune stake as gold output dips

Another weak quarter from Evolution Mining’s Mungari gold mine in Western Australia has underscored the rationale behind the miner’s investment in enigmatic producer Tribune Resources. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 2: Scott Morrison has branded Bill Shorten’s gaffe over superannuation taxes a ‘‘Michael Daley moment’’, claiming it reveals the Labor leader’s ‘‘superficial’’ grasp on policy.

Page 3: The government has seized on an independent budget update to claim vindication for its plan to return the budget to surplus and fund its big-spending tax cuts.

Page 6: Educators say they’re ‘‘stunned’’ by a collapse in the writing ability of boys, with latest national data showing boys in year 9 are more than two years below where they should be and substantially less capable than girls.

Page 9: The Tax Office is ramping up audits of taxpayers with rental deductions after finding nine in 10 claims contained errors.

Page 12: Chinese technology firms are rapidly expanding their global footprint, but policymakers and industries haven’t figured out how to deal with them.

Page 41: The boss of Australia’s biggest paint maker, Dulux Group, says he wants to keep running the company after Japanese giant Nippon Paint’s agreed $3.8 billion buyout, and claims the core business is largely immune from a housing downturn.

Page 42: Afterpay, the buy-now, pay-later juggernaut, refuses to disclose the share structure of its US subsidiary, as Australian investors assign more value to its push into the lucrative American payments market.

Page 44: Westpac Group has become the latest Australian corporate to commit to sourcing all its energy from renewables by 2025, taking its first step through a deal to buy power from a new solar farm in NSW that will also mark Spark Infrastructure’s entry into renewables generation.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Australian businesses could be forced to spend more than $25 billion on international carbon credits to meet Labor’s 45 per cent emissions reduction targets by 2030, jeopardising one of Bill Shorten’s fundamental election pillars, which he declared would have no cost to the economy.

Page 2: Superannuation fund chief Greg Combet has backed funds being able to examine industrial relations issues raised by unions providing it is done “within a proper investment and member interest lens”.

Page 4: Treasury’s pre-election forecasts have revealed the sliding housing market remains the key risk for an incoming government after next month’s election, with the deficit for the current financial year blowing out by $100 million following Josh Frydenberg’s energy assistance payment backflip.

Page 17: Hopes for a swift return to production at one of Vale’s biggest mines have pushed down the iron ore price outlook and put a swift end to a strong sharemarket run for the Pilbara majors, as concerns of a production shortfall eased.

Page 18: The ASX debut of education and payroll software provider ReadyTech was closely watched for signs of investor appetite toward tech.

Page 20: Another weak quarter from Evolution Mining’s Mungari gold mine in Western Australia has underscored the rationale behind the miner’s investment in enigmatic producer Tribune Resources.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Foreign countries wanting to use fake news to disrupt the Australian election will not be campaigning for a particular side but rather creating “chaos for chaos’ sake” in an “unprecedented” attempt to undermine democracy, the Attorney-General and intelligence insiders said last night.

Page 24: A cash-strapped wave power company that lost State Government subsidies for a planned project in the WA’s south is attempting a restructure after going into voluntary administration last month.

Native title holders in Gascoyne Junction have had 6805sqkm added to their claim. Federal Court Justice Bernard Murphy travelled to Gascoyne Junction to deliver the consent determination in favour of the Thiin-Mah, Warriyangka, Tharrkari and Jiwarli people.

Business: The company developing WA’s biggest new gold mine — the $621 million Gruyere operation near Laverton — says fears of Australian gold’s decline are exaggerated.

Saracen Mineral Holdings boss Raleigh Finlayson says having a growth business is the best defence against an accelerating skilled worker shortage in the WA mining industry.

Unions have won a reprieve for 1500 Alcoa workers after the industrial umpire rejected the cancellation of their enterprise agreement.

A little bit of rain has made a lot of difference to farmers in WA, who are starting to seed crops after dry soils were given a welcome boost.

Unions claim Albemarle has reneged on a promise to meet about employment for the construction of its $1 billion lithium refinery at Kemerton.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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