16/04/2019 - 07:04

Morning Headlines

16/04/2019 - 07:04

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Morning Headlines

Eastern Goldfields 2.0 plan

A new company emerging from the ashes of Michael Fotios’ Eastern Goldfields is planning an 18-month exploration campaign it hopes will turn the Davyhurst processing plant near Kalgoorlie into a 120,000oza-year production centre. The West

Chevron’s mega-deal calls NW Shelf stake into question

The reawakening of mega-mergers in the oil and gas sector through Chevron’s $US50 billion takeover of Anadarko Petroleum has stoked suggestions that the US-focused deal could pave the way for a rejig of interests on the other side of the world in the North West Shelf venture. The Fin

BCI sees chance to sell Buckland

The Kerry Stokes-backed BCI Minerals has put up the “for sale” sign over its long-awaited Buckland iron ore project in the Pilbara. The Aus

Leaders lock in April 29 for historic Perth debate

Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten have named Monday, April 29, as the date they will square off in an historic first-ever WA election debate. The West

Tax cut plan needs $40b off spending

The Morrison government would need to cut spending by about $40 billion a year by 2030 to afford its big personal income tax cuts and deliver on its budget surplus forecasts, new analysis by the Grattan Institute shows. The Fin

Australia could struggle to justify Huawei ban at WTO

A formal WTO challenge by China to Australia’s decision barring Chinese companies from its 5G networks would force the federal government to justify its ban either on the grounds that it does not discriminate against any country or manufacturer, or that the decision was based on national security requirements. The Fin

ALP stands firm despite bracket creep

Labor will not shift on its opposition to Scott Morrison’s planned tax cuts for higher income Australians, as the government yesterday piled pressure on Bill Shorten, warning bracket creep would take between $500 and $4000 off nurses, teachers and police officers unless the Coalition’s tax plan was adopted. The Aus

Miners place big bets on copper to cash in on electric car boom

Australian miners are placing big bets on copper to cash in on the shift to battery-powered electric vehicles, but analysts have started to wonder whether estimates of global take-up of new cars are optimistic. The Aus

‘10,000 WA jobs at risk’ under Labor

More than 10,000 jobs could be slashed from the WA economy under Labor’s plan to reduce carbon emissions, according to internal government modelling. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Morrison government would need to cut spending by about $40 billion a year by 2030 to afford its big personal income tax cuts and deliver on its budget surplus forecasts, new analysis by the Grattan Institute shows.

Opposition innovation spokesman Kim Carr has flagged plans to exempt start-ups from the research and development incentive clawbacks which shocked the sector late last year, if Labor wins government.

Page 2: A formal WTO challenge by China to Australia’s decision barring Chinese companies from its 5G networks would force the federal government to justify its ban either on the grounds that it does not discriminate against any country or manufacturer, or that the decision was based on national security requirements.

Page 3: Union boss turned KPMG senior wealth partner Paul Howes has warned the sole-purpose test must be sacrosanct, as new analysis shows industry superannuation funds will grow at twice the rate of retail funds over the next decade and Australian-Super has a virtually unassailable market lead.

Page 5: Infrastructure expert Tony Shepherd says Australia is rushing into the adoption of home storage batteries and electric vehicles without a robust framework on how to deal with batteries at the end of their lifespan.

Page 6: Crossbenchers have begun preparing a log of claims in the event of a hung Parliament, demanding action on climate change from the Coalition and scuppering Labor’s planned crackdown on franking credits and negative gearing in any deal with Bill Shorten.

Page 14: The reawakening of mega-mergers in the oil and gas sector through Chevron’s $US50 billion takeover of Anadarko Petroleum has stoked suggestions that the US-focused deal could pave the way for a rejig of interests on the other side of the world in the North West Shelf venture.

Page 16: Afterpay’s chief executive Nick Molnar has brushed off the arrival of competition in the US, saying copycats will find it tough to replicate its processes, and upstarts will ultimately help Afterpay’s own growth by introducing more retailers to the “buy now, pay later” concept.

Page 17: Nine in 10 of Australia’s top 250 websites by traffic cannot detect whether a visitor to the site is a human or a bot – an automated computer program – cybersecurity start-up Kasada has found, warning of widespread ignorance about the extent of malicious activity in the digital economy, including the ‘‘scraping’’ of data by competitors.

Page 20: One of China’s biggest phone makers, Xiaomi, a major rival to Huawei and Oppo, is planning an ambitious play for the Australian market, looking to launch an extensive range of consumer electronics products here by mid-year.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Bill Shorten will promise to fund $200 million worth of free blood tests for cancer patients and older Australians as he moves to reignite the bitter clash over pathology bulk billing that erupted during the 2016 Labor Medicare scare campaign.

Page 4: Labor will not shift on its opposition to Scott Morrison’s planned tax cuts for higher income Australians, as the government yesterday piled pressure on Bill Shorten, warning bracket creep would take between $500 and $4000 off nurses, teachers and police officers unless the Coalition’s tax plan was adopted.

Page 17: Competition tsar Rod Sims says he aims to change corporate Australia’s “disappointing” attitude towards criminal cartel behaviour by running three prosecutions a year for the foreseeable future.

Australian miners are placing big bets on copper to cash in on the shift to battery-powered electric vehicles, but analysts have started to wonder whether estimates of global take-up of new cars are optimistic.

Page 18: Family networking application Life360 appears to have locked in enough support to proceed with a $US500 million ($697m) listing on May 17, but the jury is out as to how the company will perform once listed.

The Kerry Stokes-backed BCI Minerals has put up the “for sale” sign over its long-awaited Buckland iron ore project in the Pilbara.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten have named Monday, April 29, as the date they will square off in an historic first-ever WA election debate.

Page 4: Another Labor MP has been embroiled in the Israeli-Palestinian division within the party. Video has emerged of western Sydney MP Susan Templeman likening the situation in the West Bank to apartheid.

Page 5: More than 10,000 jobs could be slashed from the WA economy under Labor’s plan to reduce carbon emissions, according to internal government modelling.

Page 14: The world’s largest beverage company said today 70 per cent of its plastic bottles made in Australia would be made from 100 per cent recycled plastic by the end of the year.

Page 17: A WA university academic has warned that the internet could be costing humans their imagination.

Business: A new company emerging from the ashes of Michael FotiosEastern Goldfields is planning an 18-month exploration campaign it hopes will turn the Davyhurst processing plant near Kalgoorlie into a 120,000oza-year production centre.

Mirvac expects to put the finishing touches on its $354 million urban infill revitalisation project with LandCorp at Leighton Beach by the end of next year.

Tiger Woods’ improbable Masters victory will reward the few companies that stuck with him through his struggles, and the ones that joined him when he was at his career low point.

A decision is imminent on a near $100 million investment by the International Finance Corporation in mineral sands miner Iluka Resources’ African business.

China’s steel industry is not prepared for a looming shortage of iron ore in the second half that will drive prices higher, according to a prominent industry adviser, who warned of volatility should mainland holdings sink below 100 million tonnes.

Demolition has started on the old Subiaco Pavilion Markets to make way for a three-building $235 million precinct including a market hall, shops, offices, apartments and a mini-town square with pop-up stalls.

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