15/04/2019 - 06:58

Morning Headlines

15/04/2019 - 06:58

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The PM sets dates for debate

Scott Morrison has set down a 48-hour period where he says an historic first-ever election debate can happen in Perth. The Prime Minister told The West Australian he was happy to debate Bill Shorten on April 29 or 30 and was excited to get the opportunity to lay out his plan for the nation and West Australians. The West

AHG takeover ‘profit trigger’

Perth car retailing king John Hughes had predicted the proposed takeover of Automotive Holdings Group by east coast rival AP Eagers could return profitability to the dealership market after years of “fierce competition”. The West

Collapsed gold miner revived in $40m raising

Collapsed gold miner Eastern Goldfields will be reborn as Ora Banda Mining following a proposed $40 million equity raising. The Aus

Rio bows to green pressure on corporate alliances

Mining giant Rio Tinto has begun a review of its industry association memberships worldwide in the wake of a push by green groups to split the Business Council of Australia over its stance on climate change and coal. The Aus

Wary of repeating history, miners hold back investment

Australian mining companies are reluctant to invest in new capacity for fear of repeating historic mistakes, according to Deloitte Access Economics, casting doubts over a major source of business investment in 2019. The Fin

Shorten digs in over franking

Bill Shorten has doubled down on plans to end cash refunds for excess franking credits, saying the May 18 election was a fundamental choice between funding such ‘‘gifts’’ and funding better health care. The Fin

Miners target refugee camps

Australian mining companies are hoping to pluck skilled workers from refugee camps under a humanitarian program that could help fill a skills vacuum. The West

Hanson slip lifts major parties

Pauline Hanson’s support has nosedived, handing Scott Morrison the equal-best primary vote for the Coalition since just after the last election but also strengthening Labor’s lead. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Bill Shorten has doubled down on plans to end cash refunds for excess franking credits, saying the May 18 election was a fundamental choice between funding such ‘‘gifts’’ and funding better health care.

Page 2: Australian mining companies are reluctant to invest in new capacity for fear of repeating historic mistakes, according to Deloitte Access Economics, casting doubts over a major source of business investment in 2019.

Page 3: The corporate regulator is investigating 90 cases of potential wrongdoing in the wealth management arms of major banks and financial institutions, double the number it was looking at last September.

Page 5: Prime Minister Scott Morrison has made a pitch to the Coalition’s toughest market – youth – and their parents by weaving together a narrative of Christian compassion and fiscal discipline as central to their future.

Page 9: Australia’s critical infrastructure remains ‘‘a significant target’’ for malicious actors and foreign powers seeking to disrupt everyday life and the economy, a new report has warned.

Page 12: British lawmakers are heaping pressure on the government to make sure that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange faces Swedish justice if prosecutors there reopen a rape investigation against him.

Page 15: National Australia Bank has lost the support of the country’s largest mortgage broking group, with its market share among borrowers seeking to refinance more than halving from 8.5 per cent to less than 4 per cent, forcing it to begin offering sweeteners to shore up support.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Pauline Hanson’s support has nosedived, handing Scott Morrison the equal-best primary vote for the Coalition since just after the last election but also strengthening Labor’s lead.

Page 2: Mining giant Rio Tinto has begun a review of its industry association memberships worldwide in the wake of a push by green groups to split the Business Council of Australia over its stance on climate change and coal.

Page 6: The Coalition has accused Bill Shorten of a $6 billion funding black hole in his centrepiece cancer care policy, with Health Department analysis suggesting it would be virtually impossible to fund free access to all cancer related items currently listed under Medicare.

Page 9: If the polls are correct, Indonesians are poised to shrug off warnings of rapacious foreigners and an economy on the verge of collapse to re-elect President Joko Widodo with a double-digit margin in the world’s biggest single-day poll on Wednesday.

Page 18: More than seven companies that have listed in the past five years and are currently worth $2.6 billion are being tipped to become takeover targets in the months ahead.

Expectations are starting to fall that Woolworths will now proceed with a sale of its $3.5 billion pubs and liquor business ALH Group, with some suspecting that the supermarket giant may retain the operation at a time it is wrestling with challenges linked to its Big W department store operations.

Page 20: Collapsed gold miner Eastern Goldfields will be reborn as Ora Banda Mining following a proposed $40 million equity raising.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Australian mining companies are hoping to pluck skilled workers from refugee camps under a humanitarian program that could help fill a skills vacuum.

Page 4: Scott Morrison has set down a 48-hour period where he says an historic first-ever election debate can happen in Perth. The Prime Minister told The West Australian he was happy to debate Bill Shorten on April 29 or 30 and was excited to get the opportunity to lay out his plan for the nation and West Australians.

Page 6: Mums, dads and tradies will have to pay up to $5000 more for a new car under Labor’s policy to boost the number of electric vehicles on the roads, while millionaires and celebrities who buy luxury cars will get a free ride.

Page 7: Bill Shorten will today announce $23 million in extra funding to slash W A hospital wait lists if Labor wins the election as he continues to make health spending the focus of his campaign.

Page 11: The McGowan Government will set quotas for employing veterans in State departments as part of efforts to help members of the military transition to civilian life.

Page 19: Julian Assange’s seven-year stay in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London cost the South American country $9 million.

Business: Perth car retailing king John Hughes had predicted the proposed takeover of Automotive Holdings Group by east coast rival AP Eagers could return profitability to the dealership market after years of “fierce competition”.

Aspiring pilots have welcomed the 2019 Budget boost for VETFEE student loans for students wanting to take to the skies, but some training providers are cautious about the extra funding.

The Australian pork industry plans to push back on the massive volumes of imported ham and bacon and to build export markets, as the green shoots of recovery emerge.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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