08/04/2019 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

08/04/2019 - 06:54

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Morning Headlines

Labor to run star candidate in Curtin to disrupt Liberals

Ex-Labor minister Melissa Parke will run for the ALP in Julie Bishop’s seat of Curtin — forcing the Liberals to divert resources into defending a blue-ribbon seat. The West

DIDO call amid BHP job cuts

Community pressure has prompted BHP to offer a drive-in, drive-out option for workers at its Pilbara mines so they can achieve a better work/life balance by living locally. The announcement comes as the mining giant looks to cut hundreds of white-collar jobs across its Australian offices, including an expected 200 redundancies from its human resources, finance and technology functions in Perth. The West

IMF warns on housing slide

Australia’s housing market contraction is worse than first thought, says a top IMF analyst, leaving the economy in what he called a ‘‘delicate situation’’ that boosts the need for faster infrastructure spending and even potential interest rate cuts. The Fin

Lynas backer lashes Wesfarmers talks

A major investor in Lynas Corporation has lashed out at Wesfarmers over its representations to the Malaysian government on the future of the rare earths miner and processor. Greencape Capital’s Ryan Green said Wesfarmers’ actions raised governance issues, given it appeared to be making representations and promises to a foreign government about assets it did not own. The Fin

New Saudi owners for WA farm

The UK-based Saudi Agricultural and Livestock Investment Company (SALIC) purchased the Nicoletti family’s 200,000ha portfolio in Western Australia’s eastern wheatbelt region for an undisclosed amount, rumoured between $60m to $70m. The Aus

Telcos must sell benefits of 5G harder

Australian telcos need to lift their game and start showcasing their 5G wares, according to Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) boss Chris Althaus. The Aus

How much is your plane ticket? Government doesn’t want to know

The federal government doesn’t know exactly what airfares travellers are paying to fly around Australia because airlines aren’t required to provide price data, bureaucrats have acknowledged in a senate inquiry into the high cost of regional airfares. The Fin

Educators eye bygone methods

An emphasis on traditional explicit teaching methods for reading, spelling and maths could help lift Australia’s academic performance across the board, as a boost in the NAPLAN results of indigenous students shines a spotlight on effective, evidence-based programs. The Aus

China invests less as FIRB toughens up

China’s new investment in Australia has fallen sharply as a result of tighter foreign investment scrutiny in Australia and overseas investment policies in China favouring Belt and Road projects, according to a survey to be released today by KPMG and the University of Sydney. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Australia’s housing market contraction is worse than first thought, says a top IMF analyst, leaving the economy in what he called a ‘‘delicate situation’’ that boosts the need for faster infrastructure spending and even potential interest rate cuts.

Page 3: A federal government plan to raise the threshold at which private companies are required to lodge accounts with the corporate regulator will only further crimp the availability of credit to small business, industry experts warn.

Page 4: Corporate tax specialist Karen Payne has been appointed the next Inspector-General of Taxation for five years, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg will announce today.

Page 14: Companies and training organisations are creating their own skills accreditations and bypassing the normal process for registering qualifications because the regulator is too slow to respond to changing technology, according to Steven Joyce, whose review of vocational education has just been released by the government.

Page 15: Insurance companies are rushing to report themselves for breaches of their code of conduct that requires them to be ‘‘honest and fair’’ to clients, in a surge that may be prompted by the Hayne royal commission.

Page 17: A major investor in Lynas Corporation has lashed out at Wesfarmers over its representations to the Malaysian government on the future of the rare earths miner and processor. Greencape Capital’s Ryan Green said Wesfarmers’ actions raised governance issues, given it appeared to be making representations and promises to a foreign government about assets it did not own.

The federal government doesn’t know exactly what airfares travellers are paying to fly around Australia because airlines aren’t required to provide price data, bureaucrats have acknowledged in a senate inquiry into the high cost of regional airfares.

Page 18: Commonwealth Bank and Telstra have teamed up on a top-secret blockchain project that aims to add new levels of security for high-value transactions completed online.

Page 29: Takeover target Automotive Holdings Group’s managing director John McConnell says bidder AP Eagers has pounced on the company at its weakest point in years.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The Coalition has moved to within striking distance of Labor with a surge in support following last week’s budget, giving Scott Morrison momentum as he prepares to call a May election.

Page 2: An emphasis on traditional explicit teaching methods for reading, spelling and maths could help lift Australia’s academic performance across the board, as a boost in the NAPLAN results of indigenous students shines a spotlight on effective, evidence-based programs.

Page 4: The Coalition’s 10 most at-risk MPs have spent nearly $450,000 of taxpayers’ money filling constituents’ letterboxes with leaflets before next month’s federal election.

Page 17: China’s new investment in Australia has fallen sharply as a result of tighter foreign investment scrutiny in Australia and overseas investment policies in China favouring Belt and Road projects, according to a survey to be released today by KPMG and the University of Sydney.

Australia’s sheep farmers have probably never had it so good as premium prices and high demand drive confidence to invest in the sector and opportunities in China continue to increase.

Page 18: Coles chief executive Steven Cain is pushing ahead with his streamlining of the supermarket giant and now turning his attention to the interaction of his merchandising executives with grocery suppliers, while triggering a restructure of his buying teams.

Page 19: Australian telcos need to lift their game and start showcasing their 5G wares, according to Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) boss Chris Althaus.

Page 22: The UK-based Saudi Agricultural and Livestock Investment Company (SALIC) purchased the Nicoletti family’s 200,000ha portfolio in Western Australia’s eastern wheatbelt region for an undisclosed amount, rumoured between $60m to $70m.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Ex-Labor minister Melissa Parke will run for the ALP in Julie Bishop’s seat of Curtin — forcing the Liberals to divert resources into defending a blue-ribbon seat.

Page 3: Farmers have been told to be on guard for animal activists trespassing on their properties as part of a nationwide protest being held today.

Page 7: Streaming is now dominating 70 per cent of the Australian music industry.

Page 10: Banks are fleecing Aussies abroad of about $15 every time they make a withdrawal overseas.

Page 17: Boys are improving their national reading test results at a slightly faster rate than girls, NAPLAN trends reveal.

Page 21: The head of WA’s powerful police union says it has had enough of the State Government putting the Budget ahead of its members as it gears up for pay negotiations this year.

Business: About 420 minority shareholders of Nkwe Platinum are livid that payment for the takeover of their shares by China’s Zijin Mining is being delayed because of legal action they are taking to secure a higher price.

Community pressure has prompted BHP to offer a drive-in, drive-out option for workers at its Pilbara mines so they can achieve a better work/life balance by living locally. The announcement comes as the mining giant looks to cut hundreds of white-collar jobs across its Australian offices, including an expected 200 redundancies from its human resources, finance and technology functions in Perth.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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