25/03/2019 - 06:41

Morning Headlines

25/03/2019 - 06:41

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Morning Headlines

Polling reveals the biggest issue in WA’s key seats

Jobs will be the deciding issue for the upcoming Federal election, according to new polling that shows uncommitted voters are more worried about the economy than border security, health or education. The West

Cotton ditched in Fitzroy plan

Cotton production is unlikely to get the green light as part of the State Government’s plans to pave the way for an agricultural hub near the Fitzroy River. The West

BHP’s chief defends China’s Belt and Road

BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie has defended China’s controversial Belt and Road infrastructure initiative, while conceding there had been ‘‘setbacks’’ on host country debt build-up. The Fin

Rinehart, Forrest and big miners sweet on Ecuador

The mining executive who prepared the ground for a tenement tug-of-war between BHP and Newcrest in Ecuador is convinced a lot more copper and gold will be found in the exploration hot spot. The Fin

Chronican plans to put NAB back in business

National Australia Bank chairmanelect Philip Chronican says the core to NAB’s post-Hayne strategy will be to stick to the traditional strength of its business bank while catching up to the rest of the big four on automation. The Fin

Tourism boss backs rebrand of Australia

Australia’s top tourism marketing guru has backed a national “rebranding” exercise that seeks to overhaul negative opinions of the country’s culture and intellect. The Aus

Age pension bill slides as super grows

Federal cabinet ministers have deliberated on confidential new Treasury modelling of the nation’s reliance on the age pension, which shows the amount of money spent on retirees will fall faster than previously expected, amid calls to dump the planned increase in the superannuation guarantee to 12 per cent. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: National Australia Bank chairman-elect Philip Chronican says the core to NAB’s post-Hayne strategy will be to stick to the traditional strength of its business bank while catching up to the rest of the big four on automation.

Page 4: Australia is set to come under increased pressure on climate change this year after French officials insisted the Morrison government’s carbon emissions targets are not ambitious enough to fully comply with the Paris agreement.

Page 5: The US Federal Reserve’s about-face on the direction of interest rates will have the Reserve Bank of Australia ‘‘scratching their heads’’ as it weighs rate cuts to counter the wealth drag from the housing market against the inflationary impulse of a likely Labor government, said Warwick McKibbin.

Page 10: Tax affairs, already a key battleground for the federal election, are at the heart of another looming political fight, with accountants and lawyers preparing to target Labor’s proposed cap on deductions for accounting costs.

Page 13: BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie has defended China’s controversial Belt and Road infrastructure initiative, while conceding there had been ‘‘setbacks’’ on host country debt build-up.

Page 14: University students have become ‘‘customers’’ and if universities are uncomfortable with that idea, they are out of touch, says the chief executive of coaching company Studiosity, Michael Larsen.

Page 17: The mining executive who prepared the ground for a tenement tug-of-war between BHP and Newcrest in Ecuador is convinced a lot more copper and gold will be found in the exploration hot spot.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Australia’s top tourism marketing guru has backed a national “rebranding” exercise that seeks to overhaul negative opinions of the country’s culture and intellect.

Page 2: Labor is positioning for a Mediscare 2.0 election campaign, vowing to unfreeze rebates on 100 GP items a year ahead of schedule as it kicks off a new marginal seats offensive over claimed Coalition “cuts” to health spending.

The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry will press Labor to drop key workplace policies, demand the Coalition act to drive down energy costs and urge bipartisan support to stop the skills collapse under a major pre-election campaign to be launched this week on behalf of the national small business sector.

Page 10: Two major trade deals, with Indonesia and Peru, are in danger of collapsing or being delayed if Labor wins government at the next election.

Virgin Australia will mark chief executive Paul Scurrah’s first day with an ad campaign designed to show the airline is more than “Qantas in shorts”.

The Morrison government will go to the federal election promising to put 22,500 more Australians on the cashless debit card that quarantines 80 per cent of their welfare payments.

Page 12: Millions of Thai voters flocked to polling stations yesterday hoping to restore democracy after five years of military rule, even as last-minute advice from the Thai king to “support the good people” sparked feverish speculation over his meaning.

Page 19: Federal cabinet ministers have deliberated on confidential new Treasury modelling of the nation’s reliance on the age pension, which shows the amount of money spent on retirees will fall faster than previously expected, amid calls to dump the planned increase in the superannuation guarantee to 12 per cent.

Page 20: The final chapter of RCR Tomlinson could soon be drawing to an end as parties line up to buy its remaining property services operations.

Page 23: The conduct regulator tallied up an eight-figure legal bill in the financial services royal commission, although it was heavily outspent by the targets of the inquiry

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Jobs will be the deciding issue for the upcoming Federal election, according to new polling that shows uncommitted voters are more worried about the economy than border security, health or education.

Page 4: Bill Shorten will revive Labor’s campaign to “save” Medicare, today promising to end the freeze on Medicare rebates a year early.

Page 11: Google has failed to crack down on an animal activist group that posted the addresses of thousands of farms, despite complaints property owners now live in fear of intruders.

Page 16: Researchers have discovered a way to sterilise organs to be used for transplants thanks to a novel use of light to eliminate viruses or bacteria donors might carry.

Page 20: Surfing WA has warned the Margaret River Pro could risk cancellation mid-competition if a local council were to disallow finals heats being surfed at a backup break.

Business: Cotton production is unlikely to get the green light as part of the State Government’s plans to pave the way for an agricultural hub near the Fitzroy River.

Shell’s Prelude floating LNG vessel shipped a cargo of condensate over the weekend, its first product offtake since arriving off the Kimberley coast almost two years ago.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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