21/03/2019 - 06:49

Morning Headlines

21/03/2019 - 06:49

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Morning Headlines

China ‘will slash ore imports’    

China could slash its iron ore imports 40 per cent as its Government winds down its stimulus of an overpriced housing sector, which would have disastrous consequences for Australian iron ore producers, a conference in Perth was told yesterday. The West

LNG nervous about Labor’s carbon plan

Heavy industry is pushing for exemptions from Labor’s carbon policy, which is expected to impose strict carbon caps just as emissions from new projects surge. The Fin

Morrison includes telcos in social media crackdown

Telstra, Optus and Vodafone have been called to a meeting by Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Tuesday to thrash out solutions to prevent violent videos – such as that of last week’s Christchurch terror attack – being live streamed and widely distributed online. The Fin

Migration cuts won’t harm economy: PM

Scott Morrison has assured a concerned business sector that capping the annual permanent migrant intake at 160,000 will not harm economic growth. The Fin

Catholic threat of new school funding war

Catholic schools are threatening to reignite the funding wars, appealing to the federal government for a boost in capital grants to help provide for an expected surge in enrolments in the coming decade. The Aus

Shorten defends trips in ‘festival of the west’  

Bill Shorten has billed taxpayers $130,000 to travel to Perth a record 19 times since the 2016 federal election, in what has become a rolling campaign to pick up five seats in Western Australia from the Coalition. The Aus

Why Kalgoorlie is the golden jobs ticket

The Goldfields has been chosen as one of the first areas in the country for a new migration zone aimed at addressing chronic skills shortages. The West

Projects offer new jobs hope

Companies proposing to build projects including a steelworks, an aluminium smelter and a nickel refinery are in talks with the State Government about setting up in Collie as part of efforts to secure the town’s economic future. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 2: Top companies are growing increasingly unhappy with the enterprise bargaining system, claiming it benefits neither party and sucks up time and resources.

Page 4: Scott Morrison has assured a concerned business sector that capping the annual permanent migrant intake at 160,000 will not harm economic growth.

Page 7: Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen will challenge the government to spend more time on consumer protection laws rather than waging ‘‘ideological war’’ on industry superannuation funds.

Page 8: Heavy industry is pushing for exemptions from Labor’s carbon policy, which is expected to impose strict carbon caps just as emissions from new projects surge.

Page 9: Telstra, Optus and Vodafone have been called to a meeting by Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Tuesday to thrash out solutions to prevent violent videos – such as that of last week’s Christchurch terror attack – being live streamed and widely distributed online.

Page 11: A special tax avoidance taskforce run by the Tax Office has recouped more than $8 billion from foreign-owned multinationals, and new estimates suggest more than 95 per cent of the largest firms are now meeting their full liabilities in Australia.

Page 17: New research estimating the impact of accounting standards that require leases to be brought on balance sheet finds that up to $100 billion of liabilities will be recognised for the top 100 companies, beginning this year.

Bunnings is cutting expenses in stores to offset the cost of the biggest investment since its ill-fated expansion to the UK: selling its entire product range, from packets of screws to pot plants and garden sheds, online.

Page 19: Farm chemicals and seed supplier Nufarm is feeling the brunt of rising environmental standards in China and drought in Australia, but rejects suggestions it needs another round of capital raising to shore up its stretched balance sheet.

 

 

The Australian

Page 3: Australia’s unique century-old bond with Turkey, forged by the Anzacs at Gallipoli, has been plunged into a diplomatic and security crisis after hardline President Recep Tayyip Erdogan seized on the Christchurch terror attack by threatening to send anti-Islamic Australian tourists home in a coffin.

Page 4: Frontline doctors and health experts are calling for a complete rethink on how to stem the soaring rate of indigenous suicides, particularly among women and children, as figures show Queensland has become the latest hotspot for Aboriginal people taking their own lives.

Federal Labor’s proposed windback of negative gearing tax breaks would cause already nervous investors to desert the property market, sending prices falling further in most cities between next year and 2022, new economic modelling shows.

Page 5: Catholic schools are threatening to reignite the funding wars, appealing to the federal government for a boost in capital grants to help provide for an expected surge in enrolments in the coming decade.

Page 7: Evidence of “extreme” and “degrading” pornography discovered by police on a computer owned by alleged Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards cannot be used against him, a judge has ruled.

Page 9: Bill Shorten has billed taxpayers $130,000 to travel to Perth a record 19 times since the 2016 federal election, in what has become a rolling campaign to pick up five seats in Western Australia from the Coalition.

Page 17: Lion Group chairman Sir Rod Eddington says the company is prepared to walk away from the sales process for its Australian dairy and drinks portfolio and retain the business as bidding stalls following the withdrawal of prospective buyers Coca-Cola Amatil and Freedom Foods.

Page 19: Australian coal is set to face tighter scrutiny at Chinese ports at least until after the May election, with a speech by Defence Minister Christopher Pyne in Singapore in January blamed in China for sparking the latest Australia-China tensions.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 8: The Federal Government is using new tax office figures on negatively geared properties to convince voters in potentially vulnerable WA seats to stick with the Coalition in the upcoming election.

The Goldfields has been chosen as one of the first areas in the country for a new migration zone aimed at addressing chronic skills shortages.

Page 9: A local government wants beachgoers to put their butts out on Cottesloe beaches but needs to decide if its long-awaited smoking ban will cover the council’s whole coastline or just its three most popular swimming spots.

Page 16: The number of WA homeowners struggling to repay their mortgage is rising and the Reserve Bank is monitoring the situation for threats to the financial system.

Page 18: Companies proposing to build projects including a steelworks, an aluminium smelter and a nickel refinery are in talks with the State Government about setting up in Collie as part of efforts to secure the town’s economic future.

Business: China could slash its iron ore imports 40 per cent as its Government winds down its stimulus of an overpriced housing sector, which would have disastrous consequences for Australian iron ore producers, a conference in Perth was told yesterday.

Northern Star Resources executive chairman Bill Beament has sold about $22 million worth of stock in the gold miner.

Australian Potash is about to embark on Australia’s first field trials to analyse WA-produced sulphate of potash fertiliser on crops, marking a major step in the company’s ambitions to offer the locally produced fertiliser at lower cost to WA farmers.

AMP has scrapped short-term cash bonuses and cut directors’ fees in an effort to avoid a second shareholder strike on remuneration and possible board spill at May’s annual general meeting.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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