19/03/2019 - 07:04

Morning Headlines

19/03/2019 - 07:04

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Morning Headlines

WA doubles down on tourism

The State Government has upped the ante in its bid to attract overseas visitors to WA. Today it will commit an extra $12 million to promote WA across the world, including in the key markets of Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Hong Kong. The West

APRA fires super shot at unions

The superannuation regulator has warned that fund trustees must prioritise member interests and manage investments ‘‘free from influence’’, in response to Coalition government concerns about trade unions pressuring industry super funds to confront companies on workplace disputes. The Fin

Cattle deaths to cost $500k

Two Aboriginal community-run stations in WA’s north will be billed half-a-million dollars by the State Government for the latter’s intervention after mass cattle deaths on the properties over the summer. The West

Surplus powered by iron ore and coal

A weaker Australian dollar and persistently stronger iron ore and coal prices will see the federal budget $9.2 billion better off over the next two financial years than Treasury forecasts, according to modelling from EY. The Fin

Local focus for Shell’s power ambitions

Oil major Shell has set out ambitions to build a major electricity generating and retailing business in Australia within the next decade as part of its global shift towards lower-carbon energy, in comments that look set to revive speculation that a significant acquisition may be on the cards. The Fin

China extends coal restrictions

Restrictions on the imports of Australian coal appear to be expanding to more ports in China, with the port of Fangcheng in southern China reportedly imposing stricter testing of Australian coal from this month. The Aus

LSS grabs Wellard abattoir

Livestock Shipping Services has bought the Beaufort River Meats abattoir from live exporter Wellard after a previously arranged sale to International Meat Co failed to eventuate. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The superannuation regulator has warned that fund trustees must prioritise member interests and manage investments ‘‘free from influence’’, in response to Coalition government concerns about trade unions pressuring industry super funds to confront companies on workplace disputes.

Labor’s planned 45 per cent cut to Australia’s carbon emissions could hit the economy more than three times harder than Coalition climate policies, costing 336,000 jobs and causing an 8 per cent drop in wages under a worst-case scenario.

Page 3: Economists expect a sell-off in homes as the fear of not getting out (FONGO) becomes more acute after a sensitivity analysis by the Reserve Bank of Australia.

Page 4: A weaker Australian dollar and persistently stronger iron ore and coal prices will see the federal budget $9.2 billion better off over the next two financial years than Treasury forecasts, according to modelling from EY.

Page 12: Westpac is digging in over a stoush with the corporate cop by rejecting a Federal Court finding that standards at the bank’s superannuation arm were comparable with those at Storm Financial.

Oil major Shell has set out ambitions to build a major electricity generating and retailing business in Australia within the next decade as part of its global shift towards lower-carbon energy, in comments that look set to revive speculation that a significant acquisition may be on the cards.

Page 14: Myer is looking to reduce theft and supply-chain costs and boost sales by installing radio frequency identification or ‘‘smart’’ tags in its $500 million private-label brands.

Rio Tinto has hit back at a push by activist investors to make it more accountable for carbon emissions produced by its customers, including Chinese steel mills.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Scott Morrison will lead a push for a global agreement among G20 countries to clamp down on tech companies when social media platforms are used to promote violence, calling for greater regulation and warning it is “unacceptable to treat the internet as an ungoverned space”.

An annual cap of 160,000 is to be placed on the permanent migration intake in a move that will cut the targets set under the former Labor government by up to 30,000 people a year and impose for the first time an official ceiling on numbers.

Page 2: Labor would have to use credits from exceeding Australia’s Kyoto climate change targets to avoid a “proxy” carbon price of almost $700 a tonne under its plans for a 45 per cent emissions reduction target and 50 per cent renewables target by 2030, according to independent modelling.

Page 7: Gun laws will be overhauled after the Christchurch terror attacks but officials will grapple with a dysfunctional shopfront, online and black market where no one knows how many weapons are circulating in New Zealand.

Page 8: As investigators probe the Ethiopian Airlines crash, US regulator the Federal Aviation Administration is facing intense scrutiny over its approval of the Boeing 737 Max.

Page 17: Restrictions on the imports of Australian coal appear to be expanding to more ports in China, with the port of Fangcheng in southern China reportedly imposing stricter testing of Australian coal from this month.

Nick Molnar, the co-founder and chief executive of juggernaut payments platform Afterpay, says he is disappointed Australian retailers have been slow to take advantage of its burgeoning operations in the US, arguing that local brands should piggyback off the fintech company to launch into the world’s biggest economy.

Page 19: The nation’s biggest listed investment company, the $7.2 billion Australian Foundation Investment Company, has surveyed its shareholder base and found more than 85 per cent of respondents declared they will be negatively impacted by the ALP’s planned elimination of excess franking credits.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: The Dutch city of Utrecht was in lockdown last night after a gunman went on a shooting spree, killing at least three people and wounding several others.

Page 2: The State Government has upped the ante in its bid to attract overseas visitors to WA. Today it will commit an extra $12 million to promote WA across the world, including in the key markets of Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Hong Kong.

Page 6: Social media giants could face regulation in Australia after they “failed miserably” in their attempts to stop the spread of horrific video of the Christchurch mass shooting.

Page 9: Confusion is growing over shark alarms installed on beaches along the Margaret River coast after two alarms went off but another between them did not.

Page 14: Elderly Australians who are preyed upon by family members will be able to ring a free hotline to learn how to protect themselves.

Page 15: Opposition Leader Bill Shorten will today announce $20 million for dedicated mental health facilities at four WA hospitals aimed at targeting the State’s methamphetamine problem.

Business: Two Aboriginal community-run stations in WA’s north will be billed half-a-million dollars by the State Government for the latter’s intervention after mass cattle deaths on the properties over the summer.

Two autonomous trucks collided at a BHP iron ore mine in the Pilbara at the weekend in an accident blamed on wet weather.

Eight giant African snails and a bunch of dried frogs were among the 43,000 items biosecurity officers intercepted coming into Perth last year.

Livestock Shipping Services has bought the Beaufort River Meats abattoir from live exporter Wellard after a previously arranged sale to International Meat Co failed to eventuate.

Food courier Deliveroo has signed up its 10,000th restaurant as it ramps up its assault on a nation increasingly reaching for the phone when it comes time to eat.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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