15/03/2019 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

15/03/2019 - 06:54

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Morning Headlines

Unions to wield $1.4trn IR weapon

The Australian Council of Trade Unions has declared that the $1.4 trillion accumulated in industry superannuation funds is workers’ money that the union movement will use as an industrial relations weapon to force companies to raise wages and conditions. The Fin

Woodside eyes solar power

Woodside has identified the best way to combine the Pilbara’s abundant sunshine and its own gas to curb carbon emissions from its LNG plants but is yet to decide where to apply it. The West

UK to hit Aussie farmers with tariffs

Britain would slap tariffs and quotas on $135 million of Australian beef and lamb exports in a no-deal Brexit, in a move that would give fresh impetus to the Morrison government’s efforts to quickly wrap up a bilateral free-trade deal with post-Brexit Britain. The Fin

AFL kicking goals as Toyota signs record $18.5m annual sponsorship deal

The AFL has signed the largest sports sponsorship deal in Australian corporate history, convincing major partner Toyota to shell out $18.5 million annually until 2023. The Aus

MUA bans to disrupt shipping

Almost 1800 wharfies will launch rolling industrial action at DP World terminals across the country next week at a time when the stevedore says it is already struggling financially. The Fin

NDIA’s $430m contractor bill

The National Disability Insurance Agency spent more than $430 million on contractors and consultants in the last calendar year, including millions of dollars in one month to a major firm to resubmit a botched review for which it had already been paid. The Aus

More pain on the way for house prices

Despite predictions last year Perth’s property values may be bottoming, experts are warning they may have further to fall. The West

Small business ‘$10b tax gap’

Small business owners — not major multinationals — are Australia’s biggest tax rorters, the nation’s top tax collector has signalled. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Australian Council of Trade Unions has declared that the $1.4 trillion accumulated in industry superannuation funds is workers’ money that the union movement will use as an industrial relations weapon to force companies to raise wages and conditions.

Page 3: Corporate watchdog James Shipton has slammed senior bankers for anonymously complaining about ASIC’s tougher stance, and questioned how committed the banking sector is to reform after the royal commission.

Page 4: Labor is likely to fall short of the Senate numbers it needs to pass key policies should it win the next election and would be at the mercy of a still sizeable but conservative crossbench, new research indicates.

Federal Labor has called on the Fair Work Commission to grant a ‘‘substantial increase’’ to the minimum wage but, unlike the ACTU, has stopped short of nominating a number.

Page 7: Industry Super’s chief economist, Stephen Anthony, says Australia’s economic outlook is such that now is the time to bring out the ‘‘fiscal cannon’’ to stimulate consumption and growth.

Page 8: Almost 1800 wharfies will launch rolling industrial action at DP World terminals across the country next week at a time when the stevedore says it is already struggling financially.

Page 10: The federal government’s net debt could be as much as $70 billion higher if the Future Fund’s investments were accounted for differently in the Commonwealth budget, Parliament’s independent fiscal watchdog says.

Page 11: Britain would slap tariffs and quotas on $135 million of Australian beef and lamb exports in a no-deal Brexit, in a move that would give fresh impetus to the Morrison government’s efforts to quickly wrap up a bilateral free-trade deal with post-Brexit Britain.

Page 15: Western Australia’s environmental watchdog has caved to intense pressure from government and gas producers and will withdraw a controversial zero-carbon guideline for new projects that had brought the LNG industry to crisis point over the past week.

Page 17: Telstra has refused to answer claims it could be using up to $150 million a year in grants for purposes other than the maintenance of its regional copper networks.

Page 19: Afterpay competitor Zip Co will target daily spending such as groceries and fuel in its rush to grab a share of the growing alternative payments market, the company’s co-founder Peter Gray said after the buy now, pay later group raised $42.8 million from institutional investors to fund further investment in products, customer acquisitions and strengthen its balance sheet.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Former ACTU secretary Bill Kelty has cautioned that Labor’s proposed living wage must be phased in sensibly and responsibly, and be linked to productivity gains, or it could risk a wages blowout and a “cost spike” for the economy.

The National Disability Insurance Agency spent more than $430 million on contractors and consultants in the last calendar year, including millions of dollars in one month to a major firm to resubmit a botched review for which it had already been paid.

Page 5: Tax Commissioner Chris Jordan says the more than $47 billion in deductions claimed against rental income every year is next on his hit list, with almost nine out of 10 tax returns involving property investment claims containing “errors”.

Page 7: Labor communications spokeswoman Michelle Rowland has called for an overhaul of Australian media policy and regulation to help establish an “agreed playing field” between media businesses and digital platforms Google and Facebook.

Page 21: The AFL has signed the largest sports sponsorship deal in Australian corporate history, convincing major partner Toyota to shell out $18.5 million annually until 2023.

Page 22: As next week’s final deadline looms in Campbell Soup Company’s sale process for Arnott’s Biscuits and other international assets, some are wondering where Mondelez International stands with respect to its interest.

Page 23: ASX-listed online retailer Kogan.com is intensifying its competition against marketplaces like eBay and Amazon, launching a new platform allowing other businesses to sell through the Kogan website.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Despite predictions last year Perth’s property values may be bottoming, experts are warning they may have further to fall.

Page 5: Local Government Minister David Templeman hopes to lift the quality of councillors across WA by imposing an online induction for candidates ahead of this year’s council elections.

Page 7: Thousands of parents whose children will today walk out of class to protest climate change inaction will be issued a “please explain” by WA schools.

Page 9: Perth publicans and recruiters have blasted an age-of-entitlement culture among some young, local jobseekers who they say lack a work ethic and are unwilling to do “the hard yards”.

Page 18: The City of Fremantle could soon become a helium balloon and drone-free area, with the council adopting changes to a 17-year-old law.

Page 24: Smokers who immediately light up when they step outside a pub, shop, hospital or airport will be fined up to $1000 from Monday. The fine is one of several new regulations that have caught the hospitality industry by surprise and penalises smokers who indulge their habit within 5m of an entrance to a public building.

Business: Small business owners — not major multinationals — are Australia’s biggest tax rorters, the nation’s top tax collector has signalled.

AMP Capital has struck a multimillion-dollar deal to buy half of Westadium, the company that helped finance the $1.5 billion Optus Stadium project.

Woodside has identified the best way to combine the Pilbara’s abundant sunshine and its own gas to curb carbon emissions from its LNG plants but is yet to decide where to apply it.

York farmer Rhys Turton has been elected president of WAFarmers, at a time when the organisation is reshaping itself into a more dynamic and proactive organisation.

 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options