12/03/2019 - 06:32

Morning Headlines

12/03/2019 - 06:32

Bookmark

Upgrade your subscription to use this feature.

Bosses in watchdog’s crosshairs

The corporate watchdog plans to target senior executives and company directors as part of a tough new police-style approach to enforcing the law set out in a confidential internal report obtained by The Australian. The Aus

‘Trust at risk’ if NDIS opens its books

Explosive information about the financial sustainability of the $22 billion National Disability Insurance Scheme is being withheld from state and territory governments because it would threaten “co-operation and trust” between jurisdictions and reveal details “at variance with certain … state expectations”. The Aus

Minister hits out at EPA

WA Environment Minister Stephen Dawson yesterday criticised the Environmental Protection Authority for not consulting properly on new carbon emission standards, insisting that he was not a jobs killer. The West

Union forces retail staff into REST super

Almost 32,000 Kmart employees, mostly young and casual, will be locked into using retail industry super fund REST as part of a new union agreement. The Fin

Telstra staff to strike over pay

Thousands of Telstra employees will walk off the job on Tuesday the telco’s refusal to meet their demands for annual pay increases in the company’s new enterprise bargaining agreement. The Fin

Virgin to stick with suspect Boeings

Virgin Australia remains committed to taking delivery of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft this year despite the deaths of 346 people in two crashes involving the near-new planes. The Aus

Rinehart’s bid for CPC rejected

The price tag on the Consolidated Pastoral Company sale is proving prohibitive to prospective buyers with Gina Rinehart knocked out of the race because her bid was not up to the level set by the vendors Terra Firma. The Aus

QBE told to pay over share sting

Insurer QBE has been ordered to pay out $11.2 million to a well-heeled sharemarket investor stung by a dodgy Perth stockbroker more than 10 years ago. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 3: Almost 32,000 Kmart employees, mostly young and casual, will be locked into using retail industry super fund REST as part of a new union agreement.

Labor will commit today to the full implementation of all but one of the 76 recommendations of the Hayne royal commission, and flag going further with an overhaul of the financial regulatory system.

Page 5: Changes in interest rates are the primary driver behind the movement in house prices and not supply and demand, according to a Reserve Bank paper that appears to contradict the bank’s governor.

Page 6: Growing ineffectiveness of monetary policy has sparked calls for more emphasis on measures to lift incomes but economists remain sceptical about Labor’s proposal for a living wage.

Page 8: Thousands of Telstra employees will walk off the job on Tuesday the telco’s refusal to meet their demands for annual pay increases in the company’s new enterprise bargaining agreement.

Page 15: Newcrest Mining says a $1 billion-plus acquisition has established a beachhead for the company in North America, where it is targeting a broader investor base amid global consolidation in the gold sector.

The corporate regulator has slammed the big four banks, Macquarie and AMP for using frustrating tactics in identifying and compensating customers hit by the fees-for-no-service scandal despite the stinging criticism from the Hayne royal commission.

Page 20: The sale of Nine’s events business is reaching the pointy end with interested parties having submitted indicative offers, and a deal could be completed in the next few weeks.

 

 

The Australian

Page 2: The health insurer for 260,000 Australian military personnel and family members, Defence Health, has been hacked as part of an apparent attempt to defraud the fund.

Page 3: Virgin Australia remains committed to taking delivery of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft this year despite the deaths of 346 people in two crashes involving the near-new planes.

Page 4: Former Liberal leader Andrew Peacock has revealed his disappointment at the coup in which Malcolm Turnbull was replaced as prime minister, but says the party must retain faith to challenge Labor in the election expected in May.

Page 5: Explosive information about the financial sustainability of the $22 billion National Disability Insurance Scheme is being withheld from state and territory governments because it would threaten “co-operation and trust” between jurisdictions and reveal details “at variance with certain … state expectations”.

The relationship between Football Federation Australia and A League clubs has reached almost toxic levels in a fight centred around millions in broadcast money and fears the competition has become dramatically less attractive to TV networks.

Page 8: The British Labour Party will not push for a vote this week on a second Brexit referendum, even if Theresa May’s deal is resoundingly defeated when Tory MPs vote on the issue today.

Page 17: The corporate watchdog plans to target senior executives and company directors as part of a tough new police-style approach to enforcing the law set out in a confidential internal report obtained by The Australian.

The decision by Norway’s giant sovereign wealth fund to cut exposure to Australia’s oil and gas operators may mark a tipping point as the industry weighs whether the move will spur the nation’s superannuation funds to trim their own fossil fuel investments.

The price tag on the Consolidated Pastoral Company sale is proving prohibitive to prospective buyers with Gina Rinehart knocked out of the race because her bid was not up to the level set by the vendors Terra Firma.

Page 20: Online outfit The Lottery Office has pushed back on moves by the West Australian government to outlaw its services, arguing it offers a lawful product.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Almost 1000 students have been suspended from WA public schools for physical aggression in the first four weeks of the school year — a 15 per cent increase on the same time last year.

Page 7: WA Environment Minister Stephen Dawson yesterday criticised the Environmental Protection Authority for not consulting properly on new carbon emission standards, insisting that he was not a jobs killer.

Page 9: Foreign GPs will have to go to regional and remote areas under a plan to shift doctors from well serviced cities to country towns struggling to provide health care for their community.

Page 10: WA Nationals have warned Federal MPs against reinstalling Barnaby Joyce as deputy prime minister “10 minutes” before the election, arguing it would hurt their push to send a West Australian to Canberra.

Page 14: Culture and Arts Minister David Templeman says it is up to the private sector to fund Sculpture by the Sea, rebuffing calls for the State Government to save it.

Business: Gindalbie Metals has played down the prospect of a protest against Ansteel’s proposed $25 million buy-out from long-time small shareholders aggrieved by their losses on the iron ore stock.

Insurer QBE has been ordered to pay out $11.2 million to a well-heeled sharemarket investor stung by a dodgy Perth stockbroker more than 10 years ago.

Demand for alternatives to meat will grow worldwide but will remain a small portion of overall consumption, ING global head of food and agribusiness Deborah Perkins will tell farmers at a conference in Perth this week.

Energy stocks have been rocked after the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund announced it would sell out of companies whose primary business is to find or produce oil and gas.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options