08/03/2019 - 06:55

Morning Headlines

08/03/2019 - 06:55

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Morning Headlines

Libs give Perth road, rail $100m

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will announce a $100 million road and rail package in Perth today, targeting marginal seats the Federal Government wants to sandbag at the election. The West

Foxtel seeks $2.5b from debt investors

News Corp and Telstra-owned pay-TV giant Foxtel is cap in hand in front of debt investors, seeking more than $2.5 billion to bankroll the company. The Fin

Labor, ACTU hose down wage fears

Labor and the ACTU have assured that any shift away from the minimum wage to a higher living wage should be done over time, with the new level to be set by the independent Fair Work Commission. The Fin

Turning water into whine           

The Swan Valley faces a curb on religion, with a local government considering a church ban in the tourist hotspot in favour of wineries, taverns and restaurants using local produce. The West

Coal crusaders eye iron ore

Activist investors targeting Australia’s coal industry have put WA’s lucrative iron ore industry on notice, demanding the State’s big miners take responsibility for the emissions generated when their product is turned into steel. The West

Retail unions block workers’ enterprise bargain

Retail unions are seeking to block an enterprise agreement backed by a majority of workers at fashion chain Noni B in the hope that Bill Shorten will restore high penalty rates if Labor wins government. The Fin

Fast-tracked work visa scheme to be expanded

Businesses making major investments into Australia will be added to a scheme for expedited work visas, a move the Morrison government says will hand employers improved certainty and help boost the economy. The Fin

Huawei won’t rule out local lawsuit on 5G

Huawei Technologies has refused to rule out legal action against the Australian government over its controversial ban on Chinese equipment from the nation’s 5G mobile networks. The Fin

Digging deep for cave overhaul

Ngilgi Cave near Yallingup is set for a $3.5 million redevelopment as the region’s major tourism body looks to jump-start stagnant visitor numbers. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: A bombshell directive from Western Australia’s environmental watchdog that all new emissions-intensive projects should be carbon-neutral has put in jeopardy proposed new LNG projects worth over $45 billion and triggered warnings of threats to the broader resources industry that underpins the state’s economy.

News Corp and Telstra-owned pay-TV giant Foxtel is cap in hand in front of debt investors, seeking more than $2.5 billion to bankroll the company.

Page 3: Former foreign minister Julie Bishop has endorsed calls for companies bidding for a share of the federal government’s $50 billion annual procurement spend to be required to meet gender equality targets.

Page 4: Labor and the ACTU have assured that any shift away from the minimum wage to a higher living wage should be done over time, with the new level to be set by the independent Fair Work Commission.

Page 5: Former Reserve Bank board members have backed governor Philip Lowe’s view that the wealth effect – where falling house prices start to eat into spending – is nowhere near severe enough to justify cutting rates and argue fiscal policies such as tax cuts would work better.

Page 6: Retail unions are seeking to block an enterprise agreement backed by a majority of workers at fashion chain Noni B in the hope that Bill Shorten will restore high penalty rates if Labor wins government.

Page 7: Poor department store sales meant retail trade had a ‘‘weak bounce’’ of just 0.1 per cent in January in seasonally adjusted terms, a result that failed to meet economists’ expectations of a 0.3 per cent rise.

Page 8: Businesses making major investments into Australia will be added to a scheme for expedited work visas, a move the Morrison government says will hand employers improved certainty and help boost the economy.

Page 10: The peak national body for lawyers has called for an end to the ‘‘culture of silence’’ around sexual harassment, saying it is ‘‘one of the greatest challenges facing the legal profession’’.

Page 12: Google says a proposal by the competition regulator to bring in new rules with large fines if it fails to take down copyright-infringing content like movies and TV shows would harm Australia’s tech industry and risk derailing global efforts to combat piracy.

Page 14: Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook would start to emphasise new privacy-shielding messaging services, a shift apparently intended to blunt both criticism of the company’s data handling and potential anti-trust action.

Page 16: Huawei Technologies has refused to rule out legal action against the Australian government over its controversial ban on Chinese equipment from the nation’s 5G mobile networks.

Page 18: Australia’s $147 billion sovereign wealth fund says it wants to invest more in Chinese technology start-ups but heightened trade tensions are a complication it will have to grapple with.

Page 20: Chinese payments juggernaut Alipay says it is targeting three billion customers as it expands into India and will become a major source of referrals to Australian retailers, but it has no plans to tackle the major banks given that its app will not be rolled out to Australian customers.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Scott Morrison is sharpening his election focus on Australia’s immigration and population levels, seizing on Finance Department costings that show Bill Shorten’s plans to lift the annual humanitarian refugee intake to 32,000 would cost the budget an extra $6.2 billion.

The Coalition’s building watchdog has threatened to pursue $5000 penalties against workers “unlawfully” joining national union protests next month after the ACTU cemented industrial relations as a key election battleground by urging 250,000 workers to walk off the job during the federal campaign.

Page 2: Energy and resources chiefs have clashed with Bill Shorten over the outlook for cleaner coal, arguing the market case for a new high efficiency, low-emissions power plant will be strengthened by Labor’s higher renewable targets.

Page 8: The Australian Bureau of Statistics has underlined the mixed fortunes of the Australian economy, releasing its January international trade report showing export revenue has hit a fresh monthly record of $40 billion, amid booming demand for commodities. The trade surplus in January reached $4.5bn, the second best on record.

Page 17: Corporate Australia may be facing a record year for shareholder-initiated resolutions after QBE Insurance and Rio Tinto were yesterday forced to put calls for improved climate-related disclosures to a vote at their annual meetings.

Page 19: Telstra’s budget mobile brand Belong is doing a lot of the heavy lifting to help the dominant telco maintain its lead in the mobile market, according to the latest snapshot of the sector by JPMorgan.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: A Perth radio station wants its listeners to help it decide whether to keep playing Michael Jackson songs after new accusations the “King of Pop” molested two young boys.

Page 7: The Swan Valley faces a curb on religion, with a local government considering a church ban in the tourist hotspot in favour of wineries, taverns and restaurants using local produce.

Page 8: Prime Minister Scott Morrison will announce a $100 million road and rail package in Perth today, targeting marginal seats the Federal Government wants to sandbag at the election.

Premier Mark McGowan was last night under mounting pressure to quash a “job-killing” plan by WA’s environment watchdog to make big polluters pay for their carbon emissions.

Page 24: Ngilgi Cave near Yallingup is set for a $3.5 million redevelopment as the region’s major tourism body looks to jump-start stagnant visitor numbers.

Business: Activist investors targeting Australia’s coal industry have put WA’s lucrative iron ore industry on notice, demanding the State’s big miners take responsibility for the emissions generated when their product is turned into steel.

Western Australians don’t recognise the clear benefits of density, despite enjoying its spin-offs in international cities, the member for Perth John Carey says.

Yellowcake hopeful Toro Energy is chipping away at costs on its Wiluna uranium project while waiting for a price rebound for the nuclear fuel.

Soup and sauce maker Rosella is spreading its wings, launching a range of bulk products aimed at restaurants, cafes and commercial kitchens.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options