28/02/2019 - 06:39

Morning Headlines

28/02/2019 - 06:39

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Morning Headlines

Barley faces China tariffs

Australian farmers fear China is on the brink of hitting them with heavy trade sanctions after Beijing failed to budge on its claims that exporters are dumping barley. The Fin

Rio reveals East Pilbara find

Rio Tinto has finally pulled the covers off its rumoured big copper find in the remote Paterson province of the East Pilbara, revealing an encouraging discovery but one that is still in its infancy. The West

Curtin Lib railed against feminism

The frontrunner to inherit Julie Bishop’s prized Liberal seat of Curtin, former Notre Dame University chief Celia Hammond, once refused to describe herself as a feminist because she claimed the movement had become “proabortion, anti-men, anti-tradition and anti-family”. The Aus

Labor promises fintech boost in WA

Labor will provide fintechs based in Perth with more regulatory support, pledging an increase in funding for the corporate regulator so it can extend its ‘‘innovation hub’’ to the city and help start-ups connect with the Asian region. The Fin

Multiplex claims $18.5m in stadium dispute

Multiplex Construction has an $18.5 million claim against engineering company Civmec under their legal dispute over steelwork at Optus Stadium. The West

Exodus as pressure builds on aged care

Two executives covering clinical and quality care at aged-care provider Estia Health have left the $600 million listed company just weeks after the royal commission into the sector began, the latest movements in an industry under significant strain. The Aus

Egg producer calls for lifeline from supermarkets

WA egg producers say the struggling industry is in desperate need of a lifeline, calling for supermarkets’ aid to save farmers from cracking under low egg prices and increasing feed costs. The West

Shell boss renews carbon price call

Shell Australia chairwoman Zoe Yujnovich has strengthened her call for Australia to adopt a carbon price “as quickly as we can”. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Rio Tinto has lavished shareholders with a $US4 billion ($5.6 billion) special dividend and given its growth prospects a much-needed boost by revealing an exciting copper prospect in Western Australia.

Page 2: Weaker than expected construction figures – as declining housing and engineering work offset a non-residential pick-up – have clouded the outlook for fourth-quarter GDP growth next week.

Page 4: The contentious phrase ‘‘social licence to operate’’ has been dumped from updated guidance by the ASX Corporate Governance Council after a furore over political correctness.

The imminent appointment of Ita Buttrose as ABC chairman clears the path for acting managing director David Anderson to take over the role permanently.

Page 10: Australian farmers fear China is on the brink of hitting them with heavy trade sanctions after Beijing failed to budge on its claims that exporters are dumping barley.

Australia will run a risk of disrupting an increasingly important relationship with India after stepping up its trade row with New Delhi over billion-dollar subsidies blamed for a global sugar glut.

Page 15: Seek chief executive Andrew Bassat looks to have succeeded in repelling investors clamouring for short-term returns after his warning that full-year profit would fall, because he was prioritising investment, was embraced by shareholders.

The corporate regulator is preparing to expose levels of mortgage application fraud and whether customers are being duped into taking out excessive loans, as it implements a new system of real-time mortgage data collection to help it target its enforcement activity.

Page 19: Labor will provide fintechs based in Perth with more regulatory support, pledging an increase in funding for the corporate regulator so it can extend its ‘‘innovation hub’’ to the city and help start-ups connect with the Asian region.

 

 

The Australian

Page 4: The frontrunner to inherit Julie Bishop’s prized Liberal seat of Curtin, former Notre Dame University chief Celia Hammond, once refused to describe herself as a feminist because she claimed the movement had become “proabortion, anti-men, anti-tradition and anti-family”.

Retirees with more than $1.6 million in self-managed superannuation will mostly be able to dodge Labor’s ban on franking credit refunds, while savers with smaller balances will bear the brunt of the opposition’s proposal, according to consultancy Pitcher Partners.

Page 5: Ultra-luxury car brands expect bumper demand in Australia this year because the super-rich behave differently from other buyers.

Page 7: Two executives covering clinical and quality care at aged-care provider Estia Health have left the $600 million listed company just weeks after the royal commission into the sector began, the latest movements in an industry under significant strain.

Page 17: National Australia Bank’s top 400 managers will have a larger share of their bonuses deferred for three years after the bank kicked off the process of overhauling its pay structure in response to a stinging investor rebuke.

Page 19: The head of Huawei’s Australian operations, John Lord, is optimistic the Chinese company will be allowed back into the 5G mobile networks in Australia, adding it can still make money in the local market despite the current ban.

Page 20: Shell Australia chairman Zoe Yujnovich has urged the Coalition and Labor to rule out any retrospective changes to the Australian oil and gas industry, arguing that any move to alter existing tax regimes could jeopardise billions in planned projects.

Rio Tinto has confirmed the worst kept secret in Australian mining, unveiling what chief executive Jean-Sebastien Jacques described as a “promising” new copper discovery in Western Australia’s Paterson Ranges.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 7: The Real Slim Shady stood up at Optus Stadium for what was the second-biggest turn out for a concert in WA, only surpassed by Adele’s 2017 show at Subiaco Oval.

Page 8: WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson has revealed West Australians consume more than $27 million worth of methamphetamine a week.

Page 11: Union bosses are refusing to apologise to a university student who says a man wearing a CFMEU MUA shirt heckled her and called her a “bitch” from outside their State conference.

Liberal Party preselectors were told that a female candidate was not suitable to be a Federal MP because she had school-age children at home, sparking a fresh row over sexism in the party as it struggles to boost the number of women in its ranks.

Page 16: Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver is planning a complete overhaul of his Australian restaurants.

Business: Rio Tinto has finally pulled the covers off its rumoured big copper find in the remote Paterson province of the East Pilbara, revealing an encouraging discovery but one that is still in its infancy.

Multiplex Construction has an $18.5 million claim against engineering company Civmec under their legal dispute over steelwork at Optus Stadium.

Shell Australia chairwoman Zoe Yujnovich has strengthened her call for Australia to adopt a carbon price “as quickly as we can”.

WA egg producers say the struggling industry is in desperate need of a lifeline, calling for supermarkets’ aid to save farmers from cracking under low egg prices and increasing feed costs.

Shares in Metals X tumbled to a 10-year low yesterday after the company nearly doubled its first-half loss as it continues to struggle to turn around its ageing Nifty copper mine in the East Pilbara.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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