18/02/2019 - 06:44

Morning Headlines

18/02/2019 - 06:44

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NAIF has cash to splash on tourism, farms

Morning Headlines

NAIF has cash to splash on tourism, farms

The taxpayer-funded Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility is stepping up its hunt for potential agriculture and tourism investments as it looks to put more of its $5 billion in funding to work. The Aus

South32 strike fears

Australia will pay a high price for any increase in industrial disputes, South32 boss Graham Kerr has warned, as business leaders prepare for the policy ramifications of a possible Labor government. The Fin

Mint joins gold class China club

The Perth Mint says its appointment as an international member of the Shanghai Gold Exchange will provide direct exposure to a broader range of buyers in the world’s biggest market for the precious metal. The West

Morrison’s Tampa moment

Scott Morrison is targeting migrant communities critical to his re-election in a bid to seize on Bill Shorten’s shift to fast-track refugee medical transfers to Australia, as the government ramps up pressure on Labor in a move drawing comparisons to John Howard’s Tampa moment. The Aus

PM heads off revolt by Nationals

The federal government has moved to head off another defeat in the lower house by agreeing to support Labor and the crossbench in helping small businesses take legal action against their bigger rivals. The Fin

Energy plan just a load of hot air?

The heavyweight backers of a fledgling advocacy group founded by former ABC radio presenter James Lush have scattered after he unveiled a radical vision to phase out fossil fuels in WA. The West

Coleman to be around for a while yet

Woodside Petroleum chief executive Peter Coleman has scotched talk in the market that he may soon head for the door, suggesting he will stay for at least another three or four years to see the oil and gas producer through the start-up of at least one of its major growth projects. The Fin

Older workers’ double tax hit

More than half a million Australians approaching retirement could suffer a double tax hit to their savings plans under Labor’s policy to axe franking credit refunds and curb negative gearing, new tax data analysis says. The Aus

Paladin cut deal with MP’s family

The family of one of Papua New Guinea’s most powerful politicians is directly benefiting from Paladin’s $423 million worth of security contracts on Manus Island, awarded by the federal government in a closed tender. The Fin

Wharfies must give five days’ notice for strikes

DP World has successfully mitigated the impact of threatened strike action by 1800 wharfies in four states, convincing the Fair Work Commission to require the maritime union to give five days’ notice of industrial action. The Fin

Lib MP targeted for Senate grilling

Labor will use parliament to target Liberal MP Ian Goodenough following revelations the West Australian backbencher used his official social media to promote his business interests and took Asian investors to two lobster businesses that give his company a commission for securing export deals. The Aus

Tough times push big dairy farmer to sell up

Long working hours and poor financial returns have driven WA’s biggest dairy farmer to call time on the industry, reigniting calls for producers to be paid a fairer price for their milk. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

P1: The federal government has moved to head off another defeat in the lower house by agreeing to support Labor and the crossbench in helping small businesses take legal action against their bigger rivals.

P1: The family of one of Papua New Guinea’s most powerful politicians is directly benefiting from Paladin’s $423 million worth of security contracts on Manus Island, awarded by the federal government in a closed tender.

P3: The audit work of the big four consulting firms PwC, KPMG, EY and Deloitte faces renewed scrutiny after a parliamentary committee expressed ‘‘ongoing concern’’ about the ‘‘deep-rooted problems in the audit market’’ and flagged a ‘‘serious review’’.

P4: Many more voters trust Labor than the Coalition to implement the recommendations of the banking royal commission, according to a poll that also shows Josh Frydenberg and his rival Chris Bowen level-pegging as the nation’s preferred Treasurer.

P7: Energy Minister Angus Taylor said the Morrison government would ‘‘not be taking a backward step’’ on energy policy and was still looking at both a default market offer and a reference price to help consumers get a better electricity deal.

P9: Investors are poised and preparing to pounce on established properties to safeguard themselves against changes to negative gearing in the event Labor wins the federal election.

P11: US and Chinese trade negotiators will meet in Washington this week with less than a fortnight left to hammer out a deal aimed at ending their trade impasse and finding common ground on the thorny issues of state subsidies and intellectual property protection.

P13: Australia will pay a high price for any increase in industrial disputes, South32 boss Graham Kerr has warned, as business leaders prepare for the policy ramifications of a possible Labor government.

P14: Woodside Petroleum chief executive Peter Coleman has scotched talk in the market that he may soon head for the door, suggesting he will stay for at least another three or four years to see the oil and gas producer through the start-up of at least one of its major growth projects.

P32: Lendlease has bagged an £8 billion ($14 billion) urban redevelopment contract in London, almost twice the size of any of its previous British contracts and one of the largest urban regeneration projects in Europe.

 

The Australian

P1: Scott Morrison is targeting migrant communities critical to his re-election in a bid to seize on Bill Shorten’s shift to fast-track refugee medical transfers to Australia, as the government ramps up pressure on Labor in a move drawing comparisons to John Howard’s Tampa moment.

P1: More than half a million Australians approaching retirement could suffer a double tax hit to their savings plans under Labor’s policy to axe franking credit refunds and curb negative gearing, new tax data analysis says.

P2: The government’s crackdown on “zombie” superannuation accounts will pile pressure on union and employer-backed industry funds relying on sky-high rates of lost and inactive member accounts to exit the $2.8 trillion nest egg system.

P2: DP World has successfully mitigated the impact of threatened strike action by 1800 wharfies in four states, convincing the Fair Work Commission to require the maritime union to give five days’ notice of industrial action.

P4: The CFMEU will demand Bill Shorten’s candidates across Queensland pledge support for the coalmining industry — including Adani’s controversial Carmichael mine — or face the wrath of union campaigners in their seats at the federal election.

P5: Labor will use parliament to target Liberal MP Ian Goodenough following revelations the West Australian backbencher used his official social media to promote his business interests and took Asian investors to two lobster businesses that give his company a commission for securing export deals.

P17: One of the nation’s largest mortgage broking groups says the Commonwealth Bank has a concerted strategy “to destroy” the broking industry.

P17: Japanese department store Uniqlo, which has become a juggernaut success story since opening in Australia five years ago, has been embroiled in a bullying and sexism scandal with one of its former executives suing it for discriminating against her due to her Caucasian heritage and gender.

P18: The taxpayer-funded Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility is stepping up its hunt for potential agriculture and tourism investments as it looks to put more of its $5 billion in funding to work.

P21: Winding back negative gearing and increasing capital gains tax would hit an already weak housing market hard and flow through the broader economy, with the ripple effect underestimated, according to Charter Hall managing director David Harrison.

 

The West Australian

P1: Nine beach alarms and 240 monitors to collect data on tagged sharks are being installed in the South West as part of the so-called smart drum-line trial to start this week.

P7: WA’s Chief Psychiatrist believes people caught with small amounts of illegal drugs should not be charged despite admitting decriminalisation could put a strain on mental health services.

P8: More asylum seekers are coming to Australia by plane than came by sea at the peak of the boat arrival crisis, new figures from the Department of Home Affairs show, sparking a fresh political row over border control.

P9: The heavyweight backers of a fledgling advocacy group founded by former ABC radio presenter James Lush have scattered after he unveiled a radical vision to phase out fossil fuels in WA.

Business: Long working hours and poor financial returns have driven WA’s biggest dairy farmer to call time on the industry, reigniting calls for producers to be paid a fairer price for their milk.

The Perth Mint says its appointment as an international member of the Shanghai Gold Exchange will provide direct exposure to a broader range of buyers in the world’s biggest market for the precious metal.

The Australian sharemarket is tipped to open in positive territory today on the back of encouraging trade talks over the weekend between the US and China.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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