22/01/2019 - 06:35

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22/01/2019 - 06:35

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Rod Jones, who quit as chief executive of Navitas in 2017 only to return as part of a private equity-led takeover offer, says more staff and an improved experience for students is needed to get the most out of the university partnerships business.

Navitas must spend to lift growth, says co-founder Jones

Rod Jones, who quit as chief executive of Navitas in 2017 only to return as part of a private equity-led takeover offer, says more staff and an improved experience for students is needed to get the most out of the university partnerships business. The Fin

Danger of global slide, IMF warns

The International Monetary Fund has sounded a warning that the world is at risk of a sharp downturn, as the global economy slows faster than expected amid trade conflicts and rising debts. The Aus

Telstra retains top brand-value crown as banks slip

The damage to the reputation of Australia’s big banks has been quantified, with their brand values falling below those of Woolworth and Coles, while Qantas has surged to become the country’s strongest brand. The Fin

AFIC acts to thwart Labor franking vow

The nation’s biggest listed investment company, Australian Foundation Investment Co, has begun to re-engineer its $7 billion equities portfolio by dumping almost half its stake in Rio Tinto and selling down shares in BHP to defend the value of franking credits ahead of any future federal Labor government overhauling the franking regime. The Aus

Farm ‘attack map’ outrage

An “attack map for activists” that reveals the locations and contact details of farmers has been slammed by the Federal Government, which says it could encourage people to “trespass or worse”. The West

‘Workchoices on water’ bid to hit snag

The Morrison government looks likely to fail in its bid to overhaul rules governing Australia’s coastal shipping sector, with the crossbench and Labor opposed to a plan dubbed ‘‘Workchoices on water’’. The Fin

Watch for consumer double whammy

The consumption sector of the Australian economy is at risk of being hit by a ‘‘double whammy’’ in 2019 if a negative wealth effect from the property downturn is coupled with a slowdown in employment growth, economists say. The Fin

Aged care feels squeeze from costs, wait lists

The $18 billion aged-care system is under significant stress and increasingly corporatised, with previously unpublished government data revealing spending on nursing homes per capita has fallen for the first time in half a decade and wait times have more than doubled in a single year. The Aus

‘Doctor’ to helm KPMG

Dealing with distressed companies has given KPMG’s next WA boss an extra filter as he chases growth in the State’s rejuvenated professional services market. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

P1: The damage to the reputation of Australia’s big banks has been quantified, with their brand values falling below those of Woolworth and Coles, while Qantas has surged to become the country’s strongest brand.

P2: Economic data from China could be the swing factor that sends the Reserve Bank into rate-cut mode, some economists say.

P3: Business leaders, including former Australian of the Year Simon McKeon, Diane Smith-Gander, Jane Hemstritch and Cameron Clyne, have banded together ahead of Australia Day to revive the push for a republic, labelling it this year’s same sex marriage debate where business can take the lead.

P5: The consumption sector of the Australian economy is at risk of being hit by a ‘‘double whammy’’ in 2019 if a negative wealth effect from the property downturn is coupled with a slowdown in employment growth, economists say.

P8: The Morrison government looks likely to fail in its bid to overhaul rules governing Australia’s coastal shipping sector, with the crossbench and Labor opposed to a plan dubbed ‘‘Workchoices on water’’.

P9: Last week global business leaders warned the World Economic Forum in a survey organised by insurance giants Zurich and March McLennan that climate change was the gravest risk facing the planet, eclipsing short-term risks of political and economic instability.

P15: Fund managers who underperform are facing renewed pressure to cut fees, embrace new fee structures and communicate better after a bad year for equities locally and internationally.

P15: Rod Jones, who quit as chief executive of Navitas in 2017 only to return as part of a private equity-led takeover offer, says more staff and an improved experience for students is needed to get the most out of the university partnerships business.

P19: New Coles managing director Steven Cain is quickly making his mark at Australia’s second-largest supermarket chain, getting a tick of approval from suppliers and closing the gap with rival Woolworths.

P33: The value of Australian hotel deals hit a six-year low of $1.8 billion in 2018 as Chinese investor capital deserted the sector and few flagship properties were offered for sale, new figures from Colliers International show. 

 

The Australian

P1: The International Monetary Fund has sounded a warning that the world is at risk of a sharp downturn, as the global economy slows faster than expected amid trade conflicts and rising debts.

P2: The $18 billion aged-care system is under significant stress and increasingly corporatised, with previously unpublished government data revealing spending on nursing homes per capita has fallen for the first time in half a decade and wait times have more than doubled in a single year.

P2: Historic footage of distressed sheep on board controversial live export ship Awassi Express will be formally investigated by the federal government following allegations Animals Australia offered money to workers in return for the vision.

P4: Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has told Britain that Australia will begin formal post-Brexit negotiations on a free-trade agreement “the second Britain is ready”, signalling the Morrison government wants a deal progressed before the likely May election.

P5: A financial adviser who ran a decade-long $4.7 million superannuation scam that fleeced the life savings of clients, including three retired NRL referees, has been found to have engaged in “blatant misuse of investor funds” — but he has not even been fined, with the corporate regulator failing to pursue one being imposed.

P15: Australia’s fourth-largest electricity retailer, Alinta Energy, has warned the federal government may have to adjust its expectations of a significant power price cut in 2019, with higher coal and gas costs and issues integrating renewables into the grid delaying bill relief by up to 18 months.

P15: The nation’s biggest listed investment company, Australian Foundation Investment Co, has begun to re-engineer its $7 billion equities portfolio by dumping almost half its stake in Rio Tinto and selling down shares in BHP to defend the value of franking credits ahead of any future federal Labor government overhauling the franking regime.

P16: Rio Tinto shareholders can expect more cash returns in the year ahead, as the global miner weighs deploying the proceeds from recent deals with options including boosting its buyback programme and unveiling a special dividend, according to UBS.

P17: Australia’s struggling property market threatens to slash state government revenues at the same time as major states seek to fund new infrastructure, putting their budgets under pressure, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

P18: Airlines’ disciplined approach to capacity on domestic routes is starting to bite with one tourism group complaining the lack of flights is stifling growth.

 

The West Australian

P3: An “attack map for activists” that reveals the locations and contact details of farmers has been slammed by the Federal Government, which says it could encourage people to “trespass or worse”.

P9: Premier Mark McGowan has personally urged BHP boss Mike Henry to cut a deal over a royalties rip-off that has shortchanged WA by up to $300 million and went undetected for more than a decade.

P19: WA’s powerful recreational fishing lobby has thrown its weight behind opposition to the State Government’s partial nationalisation of the rock lobster industry, saying it could make the prized species harder to catch.

Business: Dealing with distressed companies has given KPMG’s next WA boss an extra filter as he chases growth in the State’s rejuvenated professional services market.

Googling “Paul Conti Wines” is a test of your faith in the accuracy of the search engine’s digital maps.

Perth Glory chairman Tony Sage has asked for his listed company Cape Lambert Resources to be benched for another fortnight while his business team tries to work out what’s going down in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Speculation is mounting that AngloGold Ashanti will quit South Africa, hiving off its oncecrucial operations and listing in London or Toronto.

 

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