21/01/2019 - 06:00

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21/01/2019 - 06:00

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The resources industry is expected to be one of the unlikely drivers of wages growth in 2019, with recruiters forecasting some salaries to climb by almost a third.

Mining to ‘drive wage growth’ in 2019

The resources industry is expected to be one of the unlikely drivers of wages growth in 2019, with recruiters forecasting some salaries to climb by almost a third. The Fin

CEOs warn: stop toxic policy drift

The nation’s chief executives are warning that business conditions in 2019 will be tougher than last year, amid growing fears populist domestic policies risk worsening the economic impact of global shocks such as Brexit and the US-China trade dispute. The Aus

China GDP set to mask slowdown

China’s economy faces its toughest year in more than a decade with some economists warning true growth will fall as low as 4 per cent as deteriorating consumer confidence, a slowing manufacturing sector, and Donald Trump’s tariffs take their toll on Australia’s biggest trading partner. The Fin

Westpac, ANZ lead pack for bad super

Thousands of employers face potential legal action from the corporate watchdog for entering into sweetheart deals with retail superannuation funds at the expense of workers, with each of the 17 worst super offerings being employer-connected retail funds. The Aus

ASIC insiders wary of legal war with banks

The banking royal commission could usher in years of legal warfare with the banks and largely end the big financial settlements used to police the industry, officials inside the Australian Securities and Investments Commission believe. The Fin

PM says Libs not ‘deserting’

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has rejected suggestions that more of his MPs are weighing up their political careers. The West

Fairer go for local workers, vows ALP

Bill Shorten has fired a pre-election shot at multinationals by vowing to force more infrastructure projects into the hands of Australian companies and workers, in a union-friendly move that will escalate his assault on big business. The Aus

Cap on drumlines

Non-lethal shark drum lines aimed at keeping surfers along a popular stretch of South West coast safe may not be deployed when the surf is up because of conditions imposed by the McGowan Government. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

P1: China’s economy faces its toughest year in more than a decade with some economists warning true growth will fall as low as 4 per cent as deteriorating consumer confidence, a slowing manufacturing sector, and Donald Trump’s tariffs take their toll on Australia’s biggest trading partner.

P2: The trial of former tax deputy commissioner Michael Cranston is set to resurrect questions about the Australian Taxation Office’s integrity and put its reputation back in the dock.

P6: The banking royal commission could usher in years of legal warfare with the banks and largely end the big financial settlements used to police the industry, officials inside the Australian Securities and Investments Commission believe.

P8: The resources industry is expected to be one of the unlikely drivers of wages growth in 2019, with recruiters forecasting some salaries to climb by almost a third.

P9: Labor will require companies bidding on government contracts to demonstrate opportunities for local employees and work for Australian-based firms, part of a plan to share the benefits of a $50 billion annual procurement spend.

P11: Property price falls could double previous estimates as weakening sentiment, tight credit and oversupply continue to hit residential markets, pushing falls to their largest since the early 1980s, according to Morgan Stanley.

P14: British Prime Minister Theresa May is reportedly seeking a bilateral deal with the Irish government to remove the contentious backstop arrangement from Britain’s Brexit deal in a bid to win support for her plan for leaving the European Union.

P15: The market ructions of the past quarter bear all the hallmarks of a manageable correction, according to Federation Asset Management’s Greg Bundy, saying Apple might be worth a look.

P16: Billion-dollar copper producer Sandfire Resources is in a game of cat and mouse with ASX-listed copper hopeful MOD Resources.

P17: John Holland’s acquisition of RCR Tomlinson’s rail business will help the engineering and construction group boost revenues to $7 billion by 2021 by strengthening its project bids, says chief executive Joe Barr.

P34: The Agency has completed the buyout of Sydney-based real estate agency Top Level Real Estate, after a year of delays.

 

The Australian

P1: The nation’s chief executives are warning that business conditions in 2019 will be tougher than last year, amid growing fears populist domestic policies risk worsening the economic impact of global shocks such as Brexit and the US-China trade dispute.

P2: Bill Shorten has fired a pre-election shot at multinationals by vowing to force more infrastructure projects into the hands of Australian companies and workers, in a union-friendly move that will escalate his assault on big business.

P3: Low-fare carrier Jetstar has replaced its boarding management system after the airline repeatedly found more passengers on its flights than expected, potentially disrupting the weight and balance of the aircraft.

P4: Clive Palmer’s hopes of returning to federal parliament have been dealt a potentially fatal blow after Pauline Hanson vowed to withhold preferences in the north Queensland seat he is eyeing.

P5: More than a quarter of all Australians who own an investment property voted for Labor at the 2016 election, according to the Australian National University’s Australian Election Study.

P6: Thousands of employers face potential legal action from the corporate watchdog for entering into sweetheart deals with retail superannuation funds at the expense of workers, with each of the 17 worst super offerings being employer-connected retail funds.

P15: A new generation of healthcare providers, including international technology and retail giants, is expected to ramp up competition in Australia this year, as the digital health sector matures.

P15: Telstra is banking on automation to cut its costs, with networks boss Nikos Katinakis indicating that it’s the only way for the telco to meet the targets outlined in the “Telstra 2022” strategic overhaul.

P16: The rise of the electric vehicles was meant to mark a turnaround for nickel, the boom-and-bust metal that has been stuck in the doldrums for the past few years.

P19: Mining giant Rio Tinto calls it the world’s largest robot: mile-long driverless trains traversing the sparsely populated Australian outback on roughly 1000 miles (1600km) of track. 

 

The West Australian

P1: Non-lethal shark drum lines aimed at keeping surfers along a popular stretch of South West coast safe may not be deployed when the surf is up because of conditions imposed by the McGowan Government.

P14: Prime Minister Scott Morrison has rejected suggestions that more of his MPs are weighing up their political careers.

P14: A union proposal to dismantle working holiday visas would have a “devastating impact” on WA farmers and tourism operators, analysis shows.

P15: Thousands of WA families will soon have the option to reduce their private insurance premiums by up to $1400 a year in return for taking on a higher excess.

Business: Engineers are tipped to lead the wages pick-up in WA as the State’s new mining and infrastructure projects lift demand for professional staff.

Elon Musk has backed himself into a corner with Tesla’s most crucial car.

Jack Bogle, the champion of index funds, has probably saved everyday investors more than $1 trillion.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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