26/11/2018 - 06:47

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26/11/2018 - 06:47

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Pedal to metal at gold mines

Pedal to metal at gold mines

Australia’s latest gold rush has maintained its momentum, with the 81 tonnes produced in the three months to the end of September just a few thousand ounces shy of the previous quarter. The West

ATO targets $12b implant industry

The top 15 overseas corporations supplying Australia’s $12 billion medical devices market are all rated as tax avoidance risks under guidelines issued on Friday by the Tax Office as it sharpens its attack on transfer pricing abuses in health care. The Fin

Shorten’s tax grab to sting 300,000 voters in ALP seats

Bill Shorten’s plans to axe refunds for imputation dividends will largely target people in Coalition seats but will also hit more than 300,000 voters in Labor electorates, according to government analysis of the ALP tax grab worth more than $45 billion. The Aus

WeWork’s loss is all in the global company

Co-working hub provider WeWork deepened its Australian losses last year, due largely to an ‘‘intercompany expense’’ of nearly $3.4 million that shows how it uses transfer pricing to send profits abroad. The Fin

710,000 workers would choose to opt out of super

More than 710,000 workers would opt out of compulsory superannuation contributions if given the chance, choosing instead to boost their take-home pay, according to the first official modelling of the impact of making super voluntary. The Aus

Hayne to quiz NAB bosses on legal breaches

National Australian Bank chief executive Andrew Thorburn and chairman Ken Henry will be forced to defend their legacies against a mounting tide of evidence the bank has broken laws attracting civil and criminal penalties when they appear at the Hayne royal commission on Monday. The Fin

Australian music exports surge a massive 30pc

Australian Recording Industry Association chief executive Dan Rosen said local musicians have a chance to grab a slice of the $50 billion global record industry thanks to streaming services and legislation to protect artists copyright. The Fin

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The top 15 overseas corporations supplying Australia’s $12 billion medical devices market are all rated as tax avoidance risks under guidelines issued on Friday by the Tax Office as it sharpens its attack on transfer pricing abuses in health care.

Page 2: Australian Recording Industry Association chief executive Dan Rosen said local musicians have a chance to grab a slice of the $50 billion global record industry thanks to streaming services and legislation to protect artists copyright.

Page 3: Economies of scale across Australia’s $2.6 trillion superannuation sector have help create savings of $4.5 billion over the past 13 years, according to new Productivity Commission research, but the savings have not been passed on to members in the form of lower fees.

Page 4: The government intends to unveil a series of bigspending promises before calling a May election and has pencilled in plans for a federal budget in late March or early April.

Bank of Mum and Dad is being forced to fund more than 25 per cent of small and medium enterprise loans because of the credit crunch, which is being worsened by fall-out from the banking royal commission, according to small business Ombudsman Kate Carnell.

The Morrison government will come under renewed pressure from crossbench MPs to develop a national anticorruption body when Parliament resumes on Monday.

Page 15: National Australian Bank chief executive Andrew Thorburn and chairman Ken Henry will be forced to defend their legacies against a mounting tide of evidence the bank has broken laws attracting civil and criminal penalties when they appear at the Hayne royal commission on Monday.

Page 17: Solar farm developers that hired RCR Tomlinson are calling on the company’s bank guarantees and insurance bonds, potentially forcing banks and insurers to pay out tens of millions of dollars, after the engineering group went into administration last week.

Page 32: Co-working hub provider WeWork deepened its Australian losses last year, due largely to an ‘‘intercompany expense’’ of nearly $3.4 million that shows how it uses transfer pricing to send profits abroad.

 

           

The Australian                                                                                                                          

Page 1: More than 710,000 workers would opt out of compulsory superannuation contributions if given the chance, choosing instead to boost their take-home pay, according to the first official modelling of the impact of making super voluntary.

Scott Morrison is struggling to win back Coalition voters, with Bill Shorten’s Labor holding a 10-point lead in the two-party-preferred vote, despite a recovery in the Prime Minister’s personal popularity.

Page 2: National Cyber Security Adviser Alastair MacGibbon has attacked technology companies for their “absurd” opposition to new encryption laws aimed at neutralising terrorists, pedophiles and organised crime gangs.

Page 4: Bill Shorten’s plans to axe refunds for imputation dividends will largely target people in Coalition seats but will also hit more than 300,000 voters in Labor electorates, according to government analysis of the ALP tax grab worth more than $45 billion.

Page 5: The Supreme Court of Western Australia has upheld the confidentiality of journalists’ sources and ruled that one of the state’s most senior reporters is not required to disclose who gave him information about former federal Liberal politician Dennis Jensen.

Transport costs are eating up more than 14 per cent of annual household budgets, with increases over the last 12 months running at more than double the rate of inflation.

Page 21: Matt Comyn told Commonwealth Bank chair Catherine Livingstone the bank might have to pay compensation for ripping off term deposit customers in a letter pitching for the chief executive’s job at Australia’s biggest financial institution, royal commission documents reveal.

Queensland’s Coordinator-General has approved a $6.7 billion Chinese-backed export thermal coal mine in the Galilee Basin that could be powered by a new coalfired power station and be under construction in the next five years.

Page 24: Challenger bank Judo Capital has lifted its capital base above $500 million after securing senior debt funding from Credit Suisse to fuel its small and medium enterprise lending push.

 

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: WA parents who want to adopt children will be slapped with onerous new demands for them to promote the “cultural identity” of the child under a review of State adoption laws.

Page 6: WA golf clubs are facing a crackdown on decades-long bias against women, with the Human Rights Commission preparing new guidelines to address sexual discrimination in the sport.

Business: Australia’s latest gold rush has maintained its momentum, with the 81 tonnes produced in the three months to the end of September just a few thousand ounces shy of the previous quarter.

Millennials and other avocado fans can celebrate lower prices now and in the future but developing export markets is emerging as an important goal to ensure the industry is sustainable for growers.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is facing the best Budget position in a decade but it could be blown on an election spending splurge, forecasts for the 

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