26/03/2018 - 06:04

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26/03/2018 - 06:04

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ASX braced for trade war fallout

Australia’s main stock index is today poised to drop below 5800, its lowest point since October, amid nervousness about a potential global trade war. The Fin

GST share lift still leaves WA $4b short

A lift in WA’s share of the GST will still leave the State handing over almost $4 billion to the rest of Australia, the WA Chamber of Commerce and Industry has warned ahead of the Commonwealth Grants Commission’s latest tax carve-up. The West

New oil and gas projects to face tougher PRRT

The federal government is planning to toughen up on allowable deductions under the Petroleum Resources Rent Tax but is expected to exempt existing projects from the new regime to avoid the creation of sovereign risk. The Fin

Trade tensions threaten growth

Investors face more volatility and a test of February lows on the sharemarket early this week, as escalating US-China trade tensions threaten the global economic growth outlook. The Aus

How the VET sector is failing the economy

The latest Skills Shortage Report (August 2017) reveals a national shortfall of trained workers in every aspect of the building industry – from architects and surveyors to plasterers. The Fin

Sunrise blow as East Timor looks elsewhere

The Woodside Petroleum-led Sunrise LNG project is in danger of getting left behind despite a recent breakthrough in maritime border talks, as East Timor pursues other gas fields to launch its LNG industry. The West

Citrus orchards, vineyard values soar

Citrus orchards and commercial vineyards are selling at almost double the prices of two and three years ago, as growers enjoy bumper profits driven by demand from export markets, especially China, according to a new rural outlook report from Colliers International. The Fin

Newspoll: Labor cements lead despite anger over tax grab

Labor’s primary vote has returned to levels not seen since Malcolm Turnbull rolled Tony Abbott for the Liberal leadership, despite Bill Shorten’s plan to axe tax-credit refunds for more than one million retirees. The Aus

Cash economy squeeze aimed at funding personal tax cuts

An amnesty for cash businesses that declare previously hidden income is likely to form part of a long-awaited crackdown on the black economy, the savings from which could be used to fund the Coalition’s promise to deliver personal income tax cuts. The Fin

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Australia’s main stock index is today poised to drop below 5800, its lowest point since October, amid nervousness about a potential global trade war.

Pensioners will be shielded from the brunt of Labor’s plan to axe franking credit refunds after further analysis found low-income retirees could be excluded at little cost to the billions of dollars the measure will save the budget.

Page 3: The latest Skills Shortage Report (August 2017) reveals a national shortfall of trained workers in every aspect of the building industry – from architects and surveyors to plasterers.

Page 5: The federal government is planning to toughen up on allowable deductions under the Petroleum Resources Rent Tax but is expected to exempt existing projects from the new regime to avoid the creation of sovereign risk.

An amnesty for cash businesses that declare previously hidden income is likely to form part of a long-awaited crackdown on the black economy, the savings from which could be used to fund the Coalition’s promise to deliver personal income tax cuts.

Page 8: An Australian version of Hollywood’s ‘‘Time’s Up’’ movement against sexual harassment has been launched with a $250,000 crowdfunding campaign and Carnival Cruises chief executive Ann Sherry as patron.

Page 15: The resilience of the Australian dollar in the face of a looming trade war between the United States and China has senior currency traders wondering if it’s becoming less of a barometer for risk in global markets.

Page 17: State governments should axe more than $11 billion from the value of their electricity network assets, which would prevent consumers paying up to $380 a year too much in their power bills that covers the earlier ‘‘gold-plating’’ of the grid, the Grattan Institute has said.

China’s Tianqi said the mechanisms setting the price it pays for Australian lithium products from a local subsidiary are ‘‘appropriate’’ and production at its $700 million lithium hydroxide plant south of Perth is on track, despite an Australian Tax Office probe into the company.

Page 18: Westpac Banking Corp has plans to offer cyber security as a service to business customers, a move that could help protect the digital economy and reduce losses to the bank, after its venture capital fund, Reinventure Group, backed a seed funding round by Kasada.

Page 33: Citrus orchards and commercial vineyards are selling at almost double the prices of two and three years ago, as growers enjoy bumper profits driven by demand from export markets, especially China, according to a new rural outlook report from Colliers International.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Labor’s primary vote has returned to levels not seen since Malcolm Turnbull rolled Tony Abbott for the Liberal leadership, despite Bill Shorten’s plan to axe tax-credit refunds for more than one million retirees.

Page 6: Cricket Australia will consider unprecedented sanctions against any players and officials who conspired to cheat in the Cape Town Test after it launched a formal investigation into the ball-tampering scandal that has engulfed the national team.

Page 17: Mid-market department stores like Myer around the world are under the most pressure from online shopping and changing consumer buying trends, former David Jones chief executive Paul Zahra says.

Investors face more volatility and a test of February lows on the sharemarket early this week, as escalating US-China trade tensions threaten the global economic growth outlook.

For three and a half years, Westpac failed to meet “bare minimum” standards set by the corporate regulator for sending out credit card offers, reaping the bank $23 million in profit, Australian Securities & Investments Commission documents tendered to the financial services royal commission show.

Page 19: The Financial Services Council ignored warnings from genetics experts and failed to consult with the peak body for genetics professionals in Australia before announcing plans to create a life insurance industry body to lobby government on the use of genetic testing.

Page 24: Cricket Australia has rejected a joint bid from Nine Network and the CBS- backed Network Ten for its broadcast rights, heightening the prospect of a deal with a pay-TV component.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 6: A new diabetes treatment that will help up to 178,000 Australians a year better manage their condition will be available at a fraction of the cost next week.

South-East Asian drug syndicates are increasingly turning Perth rental properties into hydroponic cannabis farms, with police finding two a week on average since January last year.

Page 12: A war of words between doctors and one of Australia’s biggest health insurers has escalated, with the Australian Medical Association claiming patients are being dudded.

Page 14: Crossbench senators Derryn Hinch and Tim Storer will face intense pressure to pass the Turnbull Government’s corporate tax cuts when they return to Canberra today for the final parliamentary sitting week before the May Budget.

Page 18: Qantas will decide whether to run a Perth to Paris nonstop service starting late next year after evaluating nine months of operations of the London nonstop flight.

A lift in WA’s share of the GST will still leave the State handing over almost $4 billion to the rest of Australia, the WA Chamber of Commerce and Industry has warned ahead of the Commonwealth Grants Commission’s latest tax carve-up.

Business: The Woodside Petroleum-led Sunrise LNG project is in danger of getting left behind despite a recent breakthrough in maritime border talks, as East Timor pursues other gas fields to launch its LNG industry.

Australian sheep producers are set to pocket up to $50 million extra when selling young animals for slaughter, because of a change to how lamb is defined.

Tim Kestell’s Hylea Metals is expected to announce today it will begin drilling next month at its eponymous cobalt project in NSW.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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