27/02/2018 - 06:07

Morning Headlines

27/02/2018 - 06:07

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Morning Headlines

Price doubts over Andrew Forrest plan

East coast gas users have welcomed the prospect of a new source of supply into the tight NSW market in the shape of an Andrew Forrest-backed LNG import project, although some harbour doubts that imported gas would be affordable. The Fin

Mineralogy ups ante with Citic in epic battle

Clive Palmer has raised the stakes in his battle with Chinese conglomerate CITIC Limited by billions of dollars with fresh legal action over the timing of disputed royalty payments from the Sino Iron project. The Fin

Lockyer in $3m tax-call win

Former Jubilee Mines director Phil Lockyer has won nearly $3 million in damages over flawed financial advice flowing from a lucrative 2004 issue of options in the nickel high-flyer. The West

Hanson’s call to axe payroll tax wins support

Pauline Hanson wants to abolish $22 billion in payroll taxes, a proposal that has the strong backing of small businesses but would punch large holes in state budgets. The Fin

Fires and hurricane push QBE to $1.6b loss

A significant impairment of goodwill and a write-down of deferred tax assets following the reduction in the US corporate tax rate has dragged insurance giant QBE to a $US1.25 billion ($1.6 billion) full-year loss. The West

Quokkas star in $7m ad blitz

An “aggressive” $7 million tourism campaign designed to change Australia’s mind about Perth will hit TV screens on the east coast tomorrow night. The West

Watchdog moves on super firm

The corporate watchdog has asked the Federal Court to put a liquidator into a DIY superannuation promotion company linked to banned financial planner and former jailbird Mark Travis Goldenberg. The West 

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Australia’s biggest steelmaker BlueScope is headed for its second consecutive annual profit of more than $1.1 billion after aggressively pursuing growth in the United States three years ago, which will provide an important shield as President Donald Trump considers imposing sweeping tariffs and quotas on foreign steel.

Page 3: Huawei’s involvement in Australia’s new 5G mobile phone networks will require a full national security assessment by the Home Affairs Department, even after the Chinese equipment supplier was included in a key government advisory body.

Page 4: A Federal Court judge has warned the construction union’s ‘‘deplorable’’ history of breaking workplace laws means even its less-serious conduct can now attract heavy penalties.

Page 5: Pauline Hanson wants to abolish $22 billion in payroll taxes, a proposal that has the strong backing of small businesses but would punch large holes in state budgets.

Page 8: Clive Palmer has raised the stakes in his battle with Chinese conglomerate CITIC Limited by billions of dollars with fresh legal action over the timing of disputed royalty payments from the Sino Ironproject.

Page 11: Commonwealth Bank of Australia’s chief swap trader Grant Barnes told his wife he would lose his bonus and they would have to pull out of a planned house renovation, after being ‘‘ambushed’’ by ANZ and Westpac traders who were working in ‘‘cahoots’’ to manipulate the bank bill swap rate, according to court documents.

Page 14: East coast gas users have welcomed the prospect of a new source of supply into the tight NSW market in the shape of an Andrew Forrest-backed LNG import project, although some harbour doubts that imported gas would be affordable.

Page 15: Vocus Group chairman Vaughan Bowen hopes the departure of chief executive Geoff Horth can act as a ‘‘circuit-breaker’’ following a challenging run for Australia’s fourth-largest telecommunications provider, allowing staff and investors to focus on maximising the assets amassed through years of transactions.

Page 19: Australia’s chief science agency CSIRO will build on its investment in Silicon Valley last year, with three more US offices and its first Asian premises to launch this year as chief executive Larry Marshall said he was looking for one of its ‘‘moon shots’’ to pay off and go global.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Australia’s new Deputy Prime Minister, Michael McCormack, has extended an olive branch to his main rival for the Nationals leadership, David Littleproud, in a bid to return stability to the Coalition and unify a divided party room.

The fate of border security chief Roman Quaedvlieg, who has been forced to take leave for nine months at a cost to taxpayers of $500,000, now rests in the hands of the Attorney-General despite two separate reports into whether he should be sacked being completed last year.

Page 3: The Australian government has approved protection visas for followers of exiled cleric and accused terrorist Fethullah Gulen in a move certain to inflame relations with Turkey and, potentially, put at risk access to Gallipoli for Anzac Day commemorations.

Page 5: Bill Shorten has been sent a blunt warning from Labor’s left faction that it is opposed to business tax cuts as a matter of principle, setting up a showdown that may force the Opposition Leader to unwind tax cuts under a Labor government that are already legislated for millions of small businesses.

Page 6: The internet bandwidth required by homes of the heaviest net users will more than double in a decade, but the National Broadband Network has ample capacity to handle the demand, according to a federal government report.

Page 19: The competition regulator’s inquiry into the digital media market has been bolstered by enthusiastic endorsement from industry leaders as they call for a “level playing field” with Google and Facebook.

Page 23: Australia’s largest listed childcare centre operator, G8 Education, has signed up to Macquarie Telecom’s software-defined wide-area network (SD-WAN) in a bid to wean itself off the domestic ADSL services which it says are neither cheap nor fully effective.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: A quarter of Premier Mark McGowan’s Cabinet was caught speeding last year, including one minister who was fined twice in less than two months.

Page 7: Speed limits across Perth have been slashed up to 50km/h as part of a continuing review aimed at making roads safer.

Page 14: Children are eating healthier food at WA schools after a 10-year ban on tuckshops selling fatty or sugary food and drink, Curtin University researchers have found.

Page 18: An “aggressive” $7 million tourism campaign designed to change Australia’s mind about Perth will hit TV screens on the east coast tomorrow night.

Business: Former Jubilee Mines director Phil Lockyer has won nearly $3 million in damages over flawed financial advice flowing from a lucrative 2004 issue of options in the nickel high-flyer.

The corporate watchdog has asked the Federal Court to put a liquidator into a DIY superannuation promotion company linked to banned financial planner and former jailbird Mark Travis Goldenberg.

Isenita chief executive John Croll has quit his position on the same day the media monitoring group unveiled a $4 million half-year loss.

A significant impairment of goodwill and a write-down of deferred tax assets following the reduction in the US corporate tax rate has dragged insurance giant QBE to a $US1.25 billion ($1.6 billion) full-year loss.

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