23/02/2018 - 07:15

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23/02/2018 - 07:15

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Qantas set to pay tax after strong result

Qantas Airways is expected to begin paying corporate tax again from next year after reporting a record first-half result despite soaring fuel costs. The Fin

Santos ‘keen’ on Brookfield’s Quadrant at $1.5bn

Brookfield has put a price tag of more than $US1.5 billion on its stake in Quadrant Energy and Santos is reportedly becoming increasingly keen on buying the West Australian asset. The Aus

Nahan riles Nats by cutting ties with R4R

Liberal leader Mike Nahan has declared war on the $1 billion Royalties for Regions program — and potentially blown any chance of forming government again with the Nationals — saying it should no longer operate as a “sacrosanct fund”. The West

Joyce faces challenge to Nats leadership

Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce will face a leadership challenge at Monday’s Nationals party room meeting after Victorian backbencher Andrew Broad called on him to resign for the good of the party and the country. The Fin

Kogan’s wealth soars fourfold in 18 months

Kogan.com founder Ruslan Kogan says he’s more fixated with growing his business by adding new products and services than worrying about whether it will become Australia’s next $1 billion tech company. The Fin

WA tops debt list as states binge

State and territory governments are set for a borrowing binge, with new debt and refinancing of existing debt doubling this year to $55.6 billion, according to ratings agency Standard & Poor’s.y The Aus

$20m for hospital carpark with no cars

Taxpayers have paid out more than $20 million in compensation to the operator of an unused carpark at the Perth Children’s Hospital. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Qantas Airways is expected to begin paying corporate tax again from next year after reporting a record first-half result despite soaring fuel costs.

Page 3: Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce will face a leadership challenge at Monday’s Nationals party room meeting after Victorian backbencher Andrew Broad called on him to resign for the good of the party and the country.

Page 5: BHP chief executive Andrew Mackenzie said the mining giant will bring new investment and higher-paying jobs to Australia if the corporate rate was lower, restating calls from business leaders for Parliament to pass the tax cuts.

Page 6: Macquarie deputy managing director Greg Ward has rejected allegations that market manipulation, misappropriation of client funds and conflicts of interest were rife at the company’s Melbourne private wealth division but conceded mistakes were made by its advisers.

Page 10: The Clean Energy Regulator has reported a ‘‘healthy’’ surplus of large-scale renewable energy certificates and a continuing acceleration of new projects, confirming that the 2020 target will be easily met and making future ventures more reliant on other sources of revenues.

Page 14: Beijing’s state-run media has singled out Malcolm Turnbull’s visit to the United States this week to highlight what it says is growing ‘‘anxiety’’ in the West about its declining influence in south-east Asia, as the debate about China’s growing weight in the region intensifies.

Page 17: VIP gamblers are returning to casinos owned by James Packer’s Crown Resorts, particularly in Melbourne, and management of the gambling and entertainment giant believe there is even more room for growth in the number of heavy-spending Asian gamblers visiting Australia.

Kogan.com founder Ruslan Kogan says he’s more fixated with growing his business by adding new products and services than worrying about whether it will become Australia’s next $1 billion tech company.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: China studies at the Australian National University are in disarray and face an overhaul after a damning external review revealed Kevin Rudd’s $53 million China in the World centre was close to collapse, facing a $9m deficit.

Page 3: A former telecommunications technician from a modest semi-industrial suburb of Perth will stand trial for all three of the Claremont killings that shook Perth in the 1990s, although the body of Sarah Spiers — the teenager alleged to have been Bradley Robert Edwards’s first murder victim in 1996 — has never been found.

Page 4: State and territory governments are set for a borrowing binge, with new debt and refinancing of existing debt doubling this year to $55.6 billion, according to ratings agency Standard & Poor’s.

Page 18: Brookfield has put a price tag of more than $US1.5 billion on its stake in Quadrant Energy and Santos is reportedly becoming increasingly keen on buying the West Australian asset.

Shareholders in takeover target Finders Resources may be surprised to know that the closing date of the hostile bid from Indonesian consortium Eastern Field Developments has been extended.

Page 19: The Nine Network is working on a “plan B” under which it will walk away from cricket should the price of the rights rise too sharply as the broadcaster’s shares hit a 2½-year high yesterday.

Page 21: Perpetual chief executive Geoff Lloyd believes the fund manager has already dealt with the pressures that have forced rivals including AMP and now Colonial First State to shed billions of dollars in funds as they exit actively managed index-like products.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA Police have charged alleged Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards with the wilful murder of Sarah Spiers 22 years ago but the teenager’s body has still not been found.

Page 6: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is expected to offer his condolences for the victims of the Florida school shooting when he meets US President Donald Trump at the White House tomorrow, as the debate over gun laws rages in America.

WA Education Minister Sue Ellery has backed linking results from Year 9 NAPLAN tests with Year 12 graduation despite NSW yesterday dumping the requirement because of concerns it would place “unnecessary pressure” on Year 9 students.

Page 7: Subcontractors are up to hundreds of thousands of dollars out of pocket each on government projects and other jobs, after a major 60-year-old contractor suspended trade.

Page 12: Taxpayers have paid out more than $20 million in compensation to the operator of an unused carpark at the Perth Children’s Hospital.

Page 13: Liberal leader Mike Nahan has declared war on the $1 billion Royalties for Regions program — and potentially blown any chance of forming government again with the Nationals — saying it should no longer operate as a “sacrosanct fund”.

Page 24: Perth has to start planning for when it becomes the size of Melbourne, a report out today warns.

Business: A Chinese environmental crackdown which drove up global alumina prices has helped deliver a dramatic surge in the income of Alcoa’s WA-focused mining and refining operations.

Crown Resorts is hoping the new stadium on its doorstep and Qantas’ direct flights can help revive profit growth in Perth as high-rollers continue to desert its local gaming tables.

Receivers have outed some of the well-heeled investors who sank millions of dollars into buying sandalwood plantations from the now failed Quintis.

RCR Tomlinson’s shares jumped nearly 10 per cent after its operating profit exceeded market expectations.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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