11/09/2017 - 06:46

Morning Headlines

11/09/2017 - 06:46

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

Insurers call for radical surgery

Australia’s top health insurers have put aside competitive rivalries to unite to push for healthcare reform, warning regulation is fuelling perverse incentives in the system and adding to affordability pressures. The Aus

 

Heat on unions’ super cash

The financial regulator will be granted broad new powers to force the $2.3 trillion superannuation industry to make detailed disclosures of millions of dollars in hidden annual payments to unions and employer groups, and issue orders against any fund that fails to act in the best interests of its members. The Aus

 

Pay higher wages, Morrison tells bosses

Treasurer Scott Morrison has stepped up calls for employers to turn increasing profits into higher wages to help end the record run of flat wages growth. The Fin

 

Nationals rally against energy plan

The federal Nationals have fired a warning shot across Malcolm Turnbull’s bow by passing a motion opposing the proposed clean energy target or any other policy that subsidises any energy source beyond 2020. The Fin

 

Shorten faces fight over $3000 tax agent cap

Labor faces revolt from a large section of the white-collar workforce in the lead-up to the next election over plans to limit to $3000 the amount claimable for getting your tax return done. The Fin

 

Fahour, Weiss bet on Pro-Pac’s $178m deal

An ASX-listed packaging firm chaired by former Australia Post boss Ahmed Fahour is aiming for reinvigoration driven by the ‘‘bigger is better’’ theme as it buys an industrial and agricultural flexible packaging group to form an enlarged business with annual sales of $470 million. The Fin

 

Lifeline thrown to small coal exporters

A ban on government-backed loans for onshore coal and resource export operations will be overturned in the “national interest” to help fund billions of dollars in projects that are threatened by the growing reluctance of the major banks to back them. The Aus

 

Banks leave travellers exposed

Hundreds of thousands of Australians who rely on free travel insurance through premium credit cards are leaving themselves exposed to huge medical and travel bills if they are caught up in terrorist acts such as last month’s Barcelona attack. The Aus

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The federal Nationals have fired a warning shot across Malcolm Turnbull’s bow by passing a motion opposing the proposed clean energy target or any other policy that subsidises any energy source beyond 2020.

Labor commands a strong election winning lead but the Coalition is outstripping its rival as preferred economic manager, fuelling its internal belief it can still claw back into contention.

P3: The corporate regulator is under pressure from leading chairmen and chief financial officers to impose a compulsory code of conduct on influential proxy advisers, despite pushback by activist investors and super funds on any crackdown.

P6: Treasurer Scott Morrison has stepped up calls for employers to turn increasing profits into higher wages to help end the record run of flat wages growth.

P8: Labor faces revolt from a large section of the white-collar workforce in the lead-up to the next election over plans to limit to $3000 the amount claimable for getting your tax return done.

P15: Commonwealth Bank of Australia may return to global funding markets as early as this week with its first foreign bond issue since details of the AUSTRAC money laundering saga emerged.

P17: An ASX-listed packaging firm chaired by former Australia Post boss Ahmed Fahour is aiming for reinvigoration driven by the ‘‘bigger is better’’ theme as it buys an industrial and agricultural flexible packaging group to form an enlarged business with annual sales of $470 million.

 

The Australian

Page 1: The financial regulator will be granted broad new powers to force the $2.3 trillion superannuation industry to make detailed disclosures of millions of dollars in hidden annual payments to unions and employer groups, and issue orders against any fund that fails to act in the best interests of its members.

Hundreds of thousands of Australians who rely on free travel insurance through premium credit cards are leaving themselves exposed to huge medical and travel bills if they are caught up in terrorist acts such as last month’s Barcelona attack.

A ban on government-backed loans for onshore coal and resource export operations will be overturned in the “national interest” to help fund billions of dollars in projects that are threatened by the growing reluctance of the major banks to back them.

P3: Australia’s health insurance industry has warned Health Minister Greg Hunt that if he wants consumers to have lower annual premium increases next year he has just over a month to move on reforms to cut costs to the sector.

P4: The Nationals have sent a message to Malcolm Turnbull to repudiate the central finding of the Finkel review for a clean energy target and eliminate subsidies for renewables to maximise the difference with Labor over surging power bills.

P5: If One Nation candidate James Hansen had any doubts about his chances of winning the Labor seat of Maryborough, they should have been put to rest yesterday as Annastacia Palaszczuk and her cabinet came to town.

P17: Australia’s top health insurers have put aside competitive rivalries to unite to push for healthcare reform, warning regulation is fuelling perverse incentives in the system and adding to affordability pressures.

Former Reserve Bank governor Glenn Stevens has lamented the “pigeonholing’’ of big business in the economic reform debate, which he believes has too often condemned its contributions to being viewed as simply “self-serving’’.

 

The West Australian

 

The digital version of The West was unavailable this morning. Apologies for the inconvenience.

 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options