17/08/2017 - 06:47

Morning Headlines

17/08/2017 - 06:47

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Dumped boss to fight big claim

The former chief executive of one of Australia’s biggest Aboriginal corporations, who is accused of a $350,000 rip-off from his former employers, has signalled he intends to use the lack of action against him by the Federal regulator as a defence in a legal bid to get the money back. The West

 

CFMEU target for laws against militant unions

The Turnbull government has introduced tough new laws targeting the militant Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union, with broad powers to deregister unions, disqualify officials and block unions from merging if they repeatedly breach industrial laws. The Fin

 

Shorten gave AWU funds to his campaign

Bill Shorten was handed the power to give a $25,000 donation of union money to his own election campaign in 2007, when the national executive of the Australian Workers Union left funding requests from Labor candidates up to him. The Aus

 

Directors slam bank exec rules

Company directors have warned the government’s plan to strengthen executive accountability in the banking sector with new laws could backfire by creating more risk aversion, confusing the role of non-executive directors and usurping board authority to set remuneration. The Fin

 

Navy project could be Aussie-free

Australian shipbuilder Austal has warned of a foreign takeover of the nation’s naval shipbuilding industry after it was revealed the government would allow European companies to build a $30 billion fleet of frigates in Adelaide. The Aus

 

Elliott holds fire on BHP amid ‘smarter’ strategy

New York activist fund Elliott Management appears to have called a temporary ceasefire in its campaign to force change at BHP Billiton, saying it was encouraged by statements from incoming chairman Ken MacKenzie and recent moves by the miner. The Aus

 

Highway of gold

Point-to-point speed cameras will go live on Forrest Highway from September 6, with millions of dollars in fines each year expected to be generated by the technology. The West

 

Fotios to fight wind-up order

Besieged Perth businessman Michael Fotios plans to fight a court order for his mining company Eastern Goldfields to be wound up. The West

 

Fairfax confident in going it alone: Hywood

Fairfax Media chief executive Greg Hywood is confident the 186-year publisher has a strong future even if it does not participate in the industry consolidation that is expected should the government get its media ownership changes through Parliament. The Fin

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Company directors have warned the government’s plan to strengthen executive accountability in the banking sector with new laws could backfire by creating more risk aversion, confusing the role of non-executive directors and usurping board authority to set remuneration.

Seven West Media chief executive Tim Worner says sports rights costs may have peaked as he wrote down the value of the network’s long-term Olympics broadcast deal, three years before the next summer Games in Tokyo.

P3: The Turnbull government has introduced tough new laws targeting the militant Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union, with broad powers to deregister unions, disqualify officials and block unions from merging if they repeatedly breach industrial laws.

The competition regulator is scrutinising how the big four banks and Macquarie Bank set interest rates on residential mortgage products, as it seeks to stop them from passing on the government’s $6.2 billion bank levy to consumers.

P4: A bid to impose greater transparency on the ABC looks in tatters as Communications Minister Mitch Fifield scrambles to salvage the government’s media reform package with key crossbencher Nick Xenophon and the Greens.

P5: Liberal MPs despairing at the mounting crises plaguing the government are starting to question the political judgment of the Prime Minister’s office and whether the Coalition can win the next election.

P7: Australian National University only had two highly cited researchers in the latest world academic rankings, which was the main reason for the institution’s surprise fall to 97th place, almost dropping out of the hallowed top 100 list of global universities.

P13: Blood products giant CSL reported a 24 per cent increase in underlying net profit for the year to June 30 and said it will not buy back shares this year for the first time since 2008 so as to invest in future growth projects.

P15: Fairfax Media chief executive Greg Hywood is confident the 186-year publisher has a strong future even if it does not participate in the industry consolidation that is expected should the government get its media ownership changes through Parliament.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Bill Shorten was handed the power to give a $25,000 donation of union money to his own election campaign in 2007, when the national executive of the Australian Workers Union left funding requests from Labor candidates up to him.

P2: Politicians have been given a pay bump after the Remuneration Tribunal increased their travel allowances.

P4: The Turnbull government is close to sealing a deal with the Nick Xenophon Team as it races to legislate its media reform package as early as today, amid revelations key components of an agreement with One Nation may never pass parliament.

P6: Australian shipbuilder Austal has warned of a foreign takeover of the nation’s naval shipbuilding industry after it was revealed the government would allow European companies to build a $30 billion fleet of frigates in Adelaide.

P7: Clive Palmer “personally requested” Queensland Nickel’s chief financial officer to urgently funnel $1 million to mysterious Kyrgyzstani woman Evgenia Bednova for the alleged purpose of “representation fees” in November 2012, a court has heard.

John Howard will become the first national leader from the conservative side of politics to be honoured with a prime ministerial library, following John Curtin, Gough Whitlam and Bob Hawke.

P19: First it was the farcical situation that Australia, soon to be the world’s biggest liquefied natur gas producer, may need to bui an LNG import terminal to me its own domestic needs. Now, it has emerged that any future Australian LNG import terminal may never actually receive gas directly from an Australian LNG project.

P20: Coal exporter Glencore has succeeded in a long-running bid to overturn big increases in port access charges at Newcastle, a decision that could have ramifications for private infrastructure operators.

New York activist fund Elliott Management appears to have called a temporary ceasefire in its campaign to force change at BHP Billiton, saying it was encouraged by statements from incoming chairman Ken MacKenzie and recent moves by the miner.

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Point-to-point speed cameras will go live on Forrest Highway from September 6, with millions of dollars in fines each year expected to be generated by the technology.

P4: The Federal Government’s media law reform passage looks set to win the numbers in the Senate, despite a last-minute fight over anti-vaccination campaigners threatening to derail the deal yesterday.

P7: A northern suburbs high school is cracking down on students who shun the canteen to order lunches from popular online delivery services such as UberEats.

P11: The former chief executive of one of Australia’s biggest Aboriginal corporations, who is accused of a $350,000 rip-off from his former employers, has signalled he intends to use the lack of action against him by the Federal regulator as a defence in a legal bid to get the money back.

P13: WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson will launch a complete review of the agency including the controversial Frontline 2020 policing model.

The unauthorised disclosure of private medical test results by a PathWest employee to damage her love rival was referred to the Public Sector Commission yesterday by Health Minister Roger Cook.

P45: Besieged Perth businessman Michael Fotios plans to fight a court order for his mining company Eastern Goldfields to be wound up.

Producing at least 100 robotic bricklaying machines to build tens of thousands of homes in Saudi Arabia seems like a tall order for a technology that’s still in the prototype stage.

P46: Woodside Petroleum chief executive Peter Coleman has played down a perceived lack of enthusiasm among Browse joint venture partners, while conceding stakes in the long-delayed LNG project could change hands. 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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