14/07/2008 - 14:30

Money alone doesn't cut it:

14/07/2008 - 14:30

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Salary is the most important consideration for both women and men when deciding upon a new job, but it's not enough to attract job seekers, new research has found.

Money alone doesn't cut it:

Salary is the most important consideration for both women and men when deciding upon a new job, but it's not enough to attract job seekers, new research has found.

The research, titled "Generation F: Attract, Engage, Retain", found that both women and men are most likely to consider good pay and bonuses as the single most important consideration in their job search.

But when asked to rate a range of factors in terms of their importance in their last job search, in addition to good pay, supportive bosses/management was the main priority.

This was followed by job security, then personal satisfaction, a good relationship with colleagues, the ability to work to full ability, learning & development, new experiences & challenges, a genuine support of work/life balance, and a convenient location.

The research was conducted by the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (EOWA) and specialist recruiter Hays.

When male and female responses were compared, the EOWA and Hays research found that female employees (Generation F) have a number of additional factors that they value noticeably more than men. These include:
 A good organisational record of promoting and supporting women (39% more women than men)
 Flexible work conditions (20% more women than men)
 An organisation with a large number of women in senior positions (16% more women than men)
 A position that does not involve long hours or overtime (15% more women than men)
 The provision of paid maternity leave (15% more women than men).

"While women and men share similar priorities when job seeking, and organisations need to focus their attraction strategy on more than just financial benefits, employers should also be aware of these key differences," said Jane McNeill, Senior Regional Director of Hays.

"By ensuring that you are doing all you can to attract both male and female candidates, you open your vacancy to the widest possible talent pool, which enables you to source the very best staff suitable to your business.

"So it makes sense for any HR department or hiring manager to examine their business against these factors to ensure best practice. By taking action to engage current and potential female employees, you can attract and retain staff in this increasingly skills-short market," she said.

 

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