05/10/2020 - 14:00

Michael Quinlan passes away

05/10/2020 - 14:00

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UPDATED: Professor Michael Quinlan AO, who was a well-known physician and one of the founders of the University of Notre Dame Australia, has passed away after a brief illness.

Professor Michael Quinlan AO has passed away at the age of 82. Photo: University of Notre Dame

Professor Michael Quinlan AO, who was a well-known physician and one of the founders of The University of Notre Dame Australia, has passed away after a brief illness.

Mr Quinlan died unexpectedly at 82 years old at the St John of God Subiaco Hospital on October 2, his obituary read.

He was the father of five children and had 14 grandchildren.

Mr Quinlan was a consultant for many years at St John’s, beginning his tenure at the hospital – and at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and the Royal Perth Hospital – as a general physician in 1968.

He also chaired the St John of God Health Care board for three years, and was the inaugural St John of God Foundation chair.

Professor Quinlan will be long remembered by Western Australians and by health care professionals,” St John of God Health Care said on Sunday.

“The St John of God Health Care Scholarship that bears his name enables University of Notre Dame medical students to benefit from exceptional learning experiences, and we are honoured by this enduring association.

“We pass on our deepest condolences to his family and loved ones.”

Mr Quinlan also taught medical students for almost 50 years at The University of Notre Dame Australia, of which he was one of the founders and the former chancellor.

He was also the first Professor of Medicine at the university’s medical school.

He also helped to establish the university's medical school.

Health Minister Roger Cook said Mr Quinlan had made a significant contribution to the WA health sector.

“[Mr Quinlan] could be described as a true pioneer of medicine in this State and will long be remembered by health professionals and many Western Australians," Mr Cook said.

“I offer my heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.”

The present chancellor at The University of Notre Dame, Chris Ellison, said Mr Quinlan had made an outstanding contribution to the university.

“[Mr Quinlan’s] service to medicine and the community in this state was significant and we will all miss him dearly,” Mr Ellison said.

Mr Quinlan’s long-time friend and Notre Dame vice chancellor, Peter Tannock, also commented on the loss.

“Michael was extraordinary in so many ways,” Mr Tannock said.

“He had such a great commitment to Notre Dame, its health care, nursing, physiotherapy, health sciences and of course medicine.

“Everyone who knew him saw him as an inspirational leader, a person of great quality, a beautiful and good man.

“He will be a great loss to many.”

Mr Quinlan was a Fellow of the Royal Australian College of Physicians and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Australia.

He was also a board member of Ear Science Institute Australia and a non-executive director of Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation.

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