19/08/2010 - 00:00

Making partnership an artform

19/08/2010 - 00:00

Bookmark

Upgrade your subscription to use this feature.

CORPORATE social responsibility has become embedded in the cultures of many Western Australian businesses and those operating in the state. But what makes a partnership attractive to both the corporate sector and not-for-profit parties?

Making partnership an artform

CORPORATE social responsibility has become embedded in the cultures of many Western Australian businesses and those operating in the state. But what makes a partnership attractive to both the corporate sector and not-for-profit parties?

For some, supporting communities in those areas where the business has a vested interest is a driver of their community involvement policy.

French-owned petroleum company Total E&P Australia has stuck by this strategy to a certain extent, but has moved into supporting a more obscure arts program.

Since 2008, Total E&P has sponsored WA-based arts organisation Tura New Music, first supporting the Crossing Roper Bar Tour and now with Tura’s Five Elements Tour.

Total E&P has contributed $100,000 into Tura’s various programs, supporting the latest tour, which comprises a cultural melting pot of music percussion and dance from around the world and will tour from Darwin to Perth through regional WA for two weeks at the end of August.

Tura’s artistic director, Tos Mahoney, told WA Business News the partnership had been more than just a cheque in the mail.

“I think the term ‘partnership’ very much describes the relationship between Total and Tura. It is one where there has been a joining and sharing of vision. In this case, Tura is taking non mainstream cultural projects to regional and remote Australia,” Mr Mahoney said.

He said Total E&P was the perfect match for Tura and the two organisations shared a common goal.

“Total E&P Australia is a reasonably new subsidiary for the main company. They have had a commitment to community support and development and they also wanted to support something that wasn’t in the commercial or mainstream cultural practice,” Mr Mahoney said.

“There was a meeting of stories there. Tura has a commitment to regional projects. It was a perfect match.”

By partnering with Tura, he said, Total E&P had been given opportunities to build relationships with the communities it operated in, and with state and federal government agencies.

“This is the kind of partnership that will give them access to those communities through the projects that are on a grass-roots level; they are relationships we have built up over 10 years. It gives them a perspective that they wouldn’t get from the top down,” Mr Mahoney said.

Wesfarmers is another corporation to take its responsibility to the community seriously.

Last year, Wesfarmers contributed more than $57 million in community support across Australia in its four community target areas – the arts and innovation, indigenous communities, medical research and education and community.

BHP Billiton, like Wesfarmers, aims to support the communities in which it operates by providing financial support for activities that enhance the community and achieve long-term sustainability.

It supports environment and marine research, education and training, health, indigenous culture and community development, and is focused on improving these areas in Perth, Onslow and Exmouth.

BHP recently spread its socially responsible wings into a more obscure area, similar to that of Total E&P’s support of the Tura music tour.

BHP was the principal supporter of the 2010 Russian Resurrection Film Festival, held in Perth in July.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options