03/06/2020 - 14:31

Indigenous contractor wins Eliwana work

03/06/2020 - 14:31

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Aboriginal-owned business Mallard Deemy has secured $11 million in contracts with Fortescue Metals Group for work at the Eliwana iron ore mine in the Pilbara.

Mallard directors Robby Mallard (left) and Donna Meyer with Fortescue Metals Group projects director Don Hyma.

Aboriginal-owned business Mallard Deemy has secured $11 million in contracts with Fortescue Metals Group for work at the Eliwana iron ore mine in the Pilbara.

The contracts are expected to create over 100 jobs, including employees from the Pilbara and Carnarvon regions, Fortescue said.

Established in 2011, Mallard Deemy Pty Ltd is jointly owned and operated by Donna Meyer (director), a Puutu Kunti Kurrama and Pinikura (PKKP) member, and Mallard Contracting owner Robby Mallard, who is a Yamatji member.

The company has been tasked with constructing and installing laboratory, storage and administrative facilities at Fortescue’s $US1.275 billion ($A1.84 billion) Eliwana mine and rail project.

Ms Meyer said the contracts clearly demonstrated the capability of indigenous businesses, challenging assumptions they could only work on large-scale projects as sub-contractors.

“These contracts are a demonstration of Mallard Deemy’s strong capabilities and will also enable us to commit to our continued training and employment of local Aboriginal people, positioning our business very well for the future,” Ms Meyer said.

Fortescue chief executive Elizabeth Gaines said the company was committed to Aboriginal procurement.

“Supporting and investing in sustainable Aboriginal businesses is at the heart of our approach to ensuring Aboriginal communities benefit from the growth and development of our business,” she said.

“Our Billion Opportunities Aboriginal procurement program has provided a platform to demonstrate the skills and capability of Aboriginal businesses and the chance for Aboriginal people to build a future for their communities through economic opportunity.”

Fortescue’s Billion Opportunities program, established in 2011, has awarded over $2.5 billion in contracts to more than 120 Aboriginal businesses and joint venture partners.

The company had previously contracted Mallard Deemy as a subcontractor for the deconstruction of its Wheatstone camp in Onslow, prior to its relocation to Eliwana.

Over 40 per cent of the Onslow workforce were Aboriginal employees, Fortescue said.

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