29/01/2016 - 05:37

Independent living in Craigie

29/01/2016 - 05:37

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Construction is set to start on a boutique property development in Craigie that will deliver independent, accessible accommodation villas to people with disabilities.

ACCESSIBLE: The 13 villas will be developed on the site of the former Craigie high school. Photo: Attila Csaszar

Construction is set to start on a boutique property development in Craigie that will deliver independent, accessible accommodation villas to people with disabilities.

The 13 villas are being developed by Liber Victus, an arm of Claremont-based consulting group Perth Property Net.

They will be developed in collaboration with Brightwater Care Group, which will operate a 24-hour ‘concierge’ facility to support the residents.

The development is part of LandCorp’s The Vive estate, which is located on the former Craigie high school site.

Perth Property Net principal John Sheridan said the facility would fill a gap in the property market.

“There is a gaping hole in the market for suitable accommodation for people with a disability,” he said.

Mr Sheridan said many disabled people had to either retrofit existing houses or move in with their parents to gain suitable care.

Some also moved into nursing homes, for want of alternatives.

“Nursing homes fulfil a purpose, but for younger people with a disability they are not the right environment,” Mr Sheridan said.

Incoming Brightwater CEO Jennifer Lawrence said The Vive estate was setting an important precedent.

“Demand for accessible housing is only going to grow into the future,” Ms Lawrence told Business News.

“It is vitally important that accessible accommodation is a key consideration of all new developments.”

The two-bedroom villas are priced between $595,000 and $630,000.

They will have an open-plan design that complies with the Australian disability building code.

A parent or carer will be able to stay in the dwelling if required.

The 24-7 support provided by Brightwater would make it easier for younger disabled people to maintain an independent lifestyle.

The villas will be restricted to people less than 55 years of age, as younger disabled people tend to be more independent and mobile.

Mr Sheridan said there had been considerable interest in the villas, which would be on survey strata title lots similar to standard strata developments.

Buyers will be able to obtain additional care over and above the concierge support, which would be included in their strata fees.

Hillarys MP Rob Johnson, whose disabled daughter plans to buy one of the villas, championed the project.

“It was my brainchild about seven years ago when I was a minister in cabinet,” Mr Johnson told Business News.

Mr Johnson said the biggest challenge had been finding an appropriate site for the development.

He said the project would offer security to disabled people and come at no cost to taxpayers.

The new facility would suit accident victims who obtained large compensation payouts but needed more than that.

“You can get all the money in the world, but you need a reliable way of ensuring those funds last the rest of your life, and appropriate care, and the security of having a roof over your head,” Mr Johnson said.

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