31/01/2018 - 15:30

Galvin develops lead-free taps

31/01/2018 - 15:30

Bookmark

Upgrade your subscription to use this feature.

Malaga company Galvin Engineering has developed Australia's first lead-free drinking tap as the state government deals with new revelations of lead contamination in taps at a number of Western Australian schools.

Galvin develops lead-free taps
The new Ezy-Drink taps.

Malaga company Galvin Engineering has developed Australia's first lead-free drinking tap as the state government deals with new revelations of lead contamination in taps at a number of Western Australian schools.

The company has developed the GalvinClear stainless steel range of Ezy-Drink taps in response to demand for lead-free alternatives.

Galvin Engineering’s inventive and talented team of engineers developed and tested the lead-free Ezy-Drink push button taps and they are ready for installation in schools and public places including parks, recreation centres, concert venues and hospitals,” managing director Chris Galvin said.

“GalvinClear is backed by Galvin Engineering’s strong commitment to produce quality taps and fixtures which support the health, wellbeing and safety of our community.

“Our traditional push button drinking taps are manufactured from high-quality brass, and while the existing range meets strict Australian Standards and are totally safe for potable water, we are offering a greater level of choice due to the demand in the market.”

An electronically activated system has been developed to complement the taps for use in schools where fountains could remain unused for extended periods during holidays.

The announcement comes after lead was detected at five Perth schools, with testing at five more yet to be completed.

More than 800 public schools had their water pipes flushed of stagnant water, while water at 11 new schools was tested for lead.

Lead was found in water at Aspiri Primary School, Yanchep Secondary College, Oakwood Primary School, Wellard Primary School, Honeywood Primary School.

All 11 schools will be retested.

Education Minister Sue Ellery told reporters on Wednesday there was no risk to students, but bottled water would be distributed at the five untested schools as a precaution.

Ms Ellery said she had ignored advice by the health department that extra precautions were unnecessary because she had an obligation to parents to keep their children safe.

Concerns over lead contamination were raised by ChemCentre chief executive Peter McCafferty last October after he told an inquiry that the same issue with lead contamination at Perth Children's Hospital could be present at new schools.

Department of Education director general Sharyn O'Neill said taps with inconsistent results at five further schools would be made off-limits to staff and students.

She said initial tests conducted by the Department of Finance's building management and works found some taps in work areas, such as external hose taps and work sinks, showed slightly elevated levels of lead.

Slightly elevated levels were detected by the first but not second round of tests at some schools, in water pipes not used for drinking.

Ms Ellery said she was disappointed that she was not advised by the Department of Education about the late test results until Tuesday afternoon.

"I am angry about this given that the announcement was made in October last year. If there was any question that we could not get this information by the start of school today, I should have been notified," she said.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options