21/02/2008 - 11:02

Carnegie acquires new clean energy inventions from chairman

21/02/2008 - 11:02

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West Perth-based clean energy technology company, Carnegie Corporation Ltd, has acquired new solar thermal and wind aerofoil technologies, invented by its chairman Alan Burns.

West Perth-based clean energy technology company, Carnegie Corporation Ltd, has acquired new solar thermal and wind aerofoil technologies, invented by its chairman Alan Burns.

The solar thermal technology collects the thermal energy of the sun via a novel efficient means, stores it as heat in a low cost storage solution and then draws heat as required for zeroemission power generation. The energy collection component is currently at the small scale prototype stage.

The wind technology involves a unique approach to aerofoil design, and is at the computational modelling stage.

An aerofoil is a wing, propeller or blade, whose shape and orientation controls stability, direction, lift and thrust or propulsion. Current modelling shows a step-change improvement in efficiency may be possible, and that applications
may extend beyond wind turbines into turbine technology more generally.

Both technologies are at the provisional patent stage and Carnegie will pay no consideration for them but will fully fund their development and, once commercial, pay a 2 per cent royalty on revenue earned by the technologies.

Mr Burns is the inventor of a number of technologies either currently in commercial operation or under development including the Pursuit Jet Drive, a technology with no moving parts which uses steam to deliver a supersonic force that can be used as a motor or pump to efficiently drive objects and materials.

He is also inventor of the puncture-proof industrial tyre technology, the Airboss tyre, as well as Carnegie's CETO and CCP technologies.

The technologies to date have been developed by a private research company in Perth from whom Carnegie has acquired them.

Carnegie managing director, Dr Michael Ottaviano said Carnegie's aim was to become a diversified clean technology developer and operator, and the two acquisitions allowed it to apply its technical development competency across a diversified portfolio of investments in wave, clean coal, solar and wind energy.

"There is increasing interest in the clean technology sector from industry, government and investors alike and Carnegie is well placed to capitalise upon further sector growth," he said.

Carnegie is currently developing the CETO Wave Energy technology and has the exclusive rights to operate all commercial CETO wave farms in the Southern Hemisphere. The technology is on track to be commercial-ready in 2009.

Its clean coal technology, Cleaner Coal Power, is advancing towards the next phase of prototype development. A full-scale prototype is expected to be operating within three years.

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