30/10/2007 - 22:00

Beldon centre slated to be first of the new eco-breed

30/10/2007 - 22:00

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Beldon Shopping Centre may appear to be an unremarkable neighbourhood shopping centre in the northern suburbs, but a major refurbishment during the next 12 months aims to transform it into one of Australia’s first six-star Green Star centres.

Beldon centre slated to be first of the new eco-breed

Beldon Shopping Centre may appear to be an unremarkable neighbourhood shopping centre in the northern suburbs, but a major refurbishment during the next 12 months aims to transform it into one of Australia’s first six-star Green Star centres.

 

The 20-year-old centre, owned by GE Capital, has recently received conditional approval from the City of Joondalup for a minor expansion, from 3,360 square metres to 4,107sq m, under which rooftop wind turbines and photovoltaic solar cells will be installed on its rooftop.

 

It is believed the combined power of the technology will generate enough output to supply the shopping centre, with the exception of Woolworths, as well as supplying power back to the grid.

 

Project architects Cameron Chisholm Nicol and engineers Lincolne Scott have also created plans for above-and below-ground water tanks, and angled roof structures to trap rainwater.

 

GE Capital is understood to be confident of attaining a five-star rating for the project, but is looking to beat that with a top rating of six stars.

 

The ratings will eventually be given to shopping centres across Australia by the Green Building Council of Australia following the successful roll-out of its green star shopping centre design pilot.

 

The initiative provides tools for stakeholders to assess the environmental impact of new shopping centres, centre additions and major refurbishments, and rates properties from four-star ‘best practice’ through to six-star ‘world leadership’.

 

CB Richard Ellis building consultant Catherine Fenwick said it was expected the new-look centre would open later next year and would break new ground in the sustainability stakes.

 

The stakeholders were also working on new guidelines that would place more responsibility for environmental management on tenants, she said.

 

“We’re working up the guidelines now which will include requiring that tenants use low-emission paints when fitting out their stores, and right down to determining where they source their products from and the end use of their products,” Ms Fenwick told WA Business News.

 

“We even go so far as to make sure once the fit-out is dismantled which products should be recycled such as steel and timber. It’s about addressing the whole life cycle of the building.”

 

Ms Fenwick said the centre’s tenants had been consulted and were generally supportive of the measures.

 

The Green Building Council is considering developing a set of rating tools to address retail tenancy fit-outs, but is yet to make a commitment.

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