28/07/2014 - 11:11

Abetz announces employment reforms

28/07/2014 - 11:11

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The federal government has today released draft reforms to its employment services model, including changes to work for the dole and $5.1 billion of spending over three years to deliver the programs.

Abetz announces employment reforms
Eric Abetz has today announced changes to the government's employment services model.

The federal government has today released draft reforms to its employment services model, including changes to work for the dole and $5.1 billion of spending over three years to deliver the programs.

The reforms include requirements for job seekers under 50 years of age to participate in work for the dole up to 25 hours a week, six months a year, and to look for up to 40 jobs a month to qualify for support.

Employment Minister Eric Abetz said the approach would deliver better outcomes for job seekers, employers and taxpayers.

“The Australian government is committed to helping more Australians move from welfare to work and increasing workforce participation,” Senator Abetz said.

“In order to achieve this, it is vital that our publicly-funded employment system delivers high quality services to job seekers and effective, tailored support to employers.

“The current Job Services Australia system has lost focus and become mired in red tape. 

“As a result, the number of people moving into work under the current arrangements has steadily decreased.”

The announcement included work for the dole coordinators created for each region to manage the scheme, and includes regional loadings for job providers in areas of labour market pressure.

The government will also move forward with its Restart allowance for mature age workers, subsidies for young jobseekers and for the long-term unemployed.

Assistant Employment Minister Luke Hartsuyker said the model would provide clearer incentives for performance.

“Mutual obligation requirements have been simplified and extended to ensure more job seekers remain active and engaged while looking for work,” Mr Hartsuyker said.

“Resources are targeted at those job seekers who need the greatest support to find a job.

“There will also be a significant reduction in red tape and greater flexibility so that providers can tailor services to the needs of job seekers and providers.”

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