16/10/2007 - 22:00

A changing work culture

16/10/2007 - 22:00

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The skills shortage has forced many business operators to adopt a more flexible approach to paternity leave provisions.

A changing work culture

The skills shortage has forced many business operators to adopt a more flexible approach to paternity leave provisions.

Speaking at the launch of the WA Business News 40under40 Awards this week, Sally Malay Mining Ltd managing director Peter Harold said his business had become more accommodating of people’s needs.

He said the nickel miner had created a new position based in Perth for a mine site employee in order to retain the employee after his wife became pregnant.

“About 10 years ago we would have probably have let him go,” Mr Harold said. “But he adds a lot of value and it has been a good opportunity…it is important to embrace that change in our management style.”

iiNet managing director Michael Malone said getting women back into the workforce was difficult.

“Offering incentives for people to come back to the workforce and paying them out then seems to be a better option for the company,” he said.

AHS Hospitality managing director Stephen Lauder said paid maternity leave was a cost that not all businesses could afford and it was unlikely to be widespread without government intervention.

Australian Mine Services general manager Julie Smith-Massara said women returning the workforce often brought a range of new and good skills for the business.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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