08/12/2009 - 16:08

30-yr plans critical for land: UDIA

08/12/2009 - 16:08

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The Urban Development Institute of Australia has welcomed the federal government's move to provide infrastructure funding based on 30-year strategic plans suggesting it's a critical step required to meet growing demand for land.

30-yr plans critical for land: UDIA

The Urban Development Institute of Australia has welcomed the federal government's move to provide infrastructure funding based on 30-year strategic plans, suggesting it's a critical step required to meet growing demand for land.

UDIA chief executive, Debra Goostrey said sufficient land supply is the key to maintaining housing affordability, particularly in this period of economic growth and record population increases.

"This new requirement for states to provide a 30 year strategic plan for their capital city in order to
secure federal infrastructure funding should ensure a more coordinated and streamlined land release program in the coming years," Ms Goostrey said.

"To get lots on the ground and on the market, we must be clear on what infrastructure is required and make sure it is funded and implemented."

 

FEDERAL FUNDING FOR INFRASTRUCTURE WELCOMED

The federal government's latest agreement with the states and territories to provide infrastructure
funding based on 30 year strategic plans is critical if we are to meet growing demand for land according to the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) (WA).

"Sufficient land supply is the key to maintaining housing affordability, particularly in this period of
economic growth and record population increases," UDIA CEO Debra Goostrey said.

"This new requirement for states to provide a 30 year strategic plan for their capital city in order to
secure federal infrastructure funding should ensure a more coordinated and streamlined land release program in the coming years," Ms Goostrey said.

"While the state government has recently initiated some good work in regard to future planning, the criteria that the federal government has laid down will provide the next step - laying out a clear picture for where and when infrastructure and transport will be required," Ms Goostrey said.

"One of the major delays to land supply is that infrastructure for services such as water and power or major roads is not always keeping up with the development front," Ms Goostrey said.

"To get lots on the ground and on the market, we must be clear on what infrastructure is required and make sure it is funded and implemented."

"This strategy puts the importance of sufficient land supply front and centre of the national agenda," Ms Goostrey said.

"This is acknowledgement that land supply is the key to maintaining housing affordability during periods of sustained economic growth."

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