11/02/2021 - 11:50

$15m heritage hatchery proposal to be refused

11/02/2021 - 11:50

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

A $15 million plan to build an eight-storey apartment building incorporating the century-old former Albany Bell Hatchery in Mount Lawley has been recommended for refusal.

$15m heritage hatchery proposal to be refused
A concept design of the proposed apartment building by Perth-based architectural firm Cameron Chisholm Nicol.

A $15 million plan to build an eight-storey apartment building incorporating the century-old former Albany Bell Hatchery in Mount Lawley has been recommended for refusal over fears it would not fit with the character of the area.

The development application, filed by urban planning advisory element on behalf of Melbourne-based property developer Viapac, proposes a five to eight-storey building featuring a main reception area, dining, bar and guest meeting room, 152 apartments, and 62 car parking bays.

The development would be built across two lots on Guildford Road, both of which are owned by Chinese apartment developer Sunlong Holdings and have a combined area of more than 5,500 square metres.

The City of Bayswater’s Design Review Panel were supportive of the proposal, commending the proponent on its elegant approach and for satisfying the heritage, character and context, built form and scale requirements.

However, it did recommend that planning staff interrogate minor issues, including landscaping and car parking, and request additional commitments to sustaining the site, which features the front façade of the state heritage listed hatchery - one of the first dedicated chicken hatcheries in Perth.

But the city's officers confirmed that they had expressed concerns relating to building height pre and post lodgement, concerns not capable of being ameliorated through conditions, and ones the applicant was allegedly not willing to amend. 

Surrounding residents raised similar concerns during the public consultation period, in which 42 objections and one submission of support were received.

As such, officers recommended the Metro Inner-North Joint Development Assessment Panel accept the application as appropriate for consideration and compatible with the city’s Town Planning Scheme, but refuse it on the basis that it would result in an undue impact on the amenity of the area, it does not meet residential design codes and that the height of the development did not fit with the character of the street and local area.

The panel is due to meet to consider the application next week.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options