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Gary Martin

Emeritus Professor Gary Martin commenced as chief executive and executive director of AIM WA at the beginning of 2012. Prior to his appointment to AIM WA, he held several executive level appointments at Murdoch University in Western Australia including Executive Dean, Pro Vice Chancellor, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Vice Chancellor, and Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor. Professor Martin is a learning and development specialist with expertise in adult learning development with a particular interest in action learning and mentoring as management and leadership development strategies. He has extensive experience in the design and delivery of learning and development programs in Western Australia and internationally, with both government and non-government clients. Professor Martin is chair of Telethon Speech and Hearing in Perth and former chair of Study Perth from 2008-2011. He was made a Fellow of the Australian College of Educators in 2015 and is Emeritus Professor of Murdoch University’s School of Management & Governance and Zhejiang University of Technology in China, and Honorary Professor at Guangdong University of Business Studies, China.

Post at your own peril

OPINION: We love our kids, but oversharing online can have significant downsides.

The future of learning is personal

OPINION: Far from making teachers obsolete, personalised learning requires them to use their current skills while developing new ones.

Patience prudent when dealing with teacher troubles

OPINION: Kids often struggle to settle in at the start of a school year, and finding a good fit with every teacher is challenging.

School boards not for the faint hearted

OPINION: Expectations of school boards are changing, and their makeup is evolving accordingly.

PD failing to address teacher needs

OPINION: The start of each new school year brings with it the perennial challenge even the most seasoned school leader must face: how to provide quality professional development for an increasingly diverse group of teachers.

Young microentrepreneurs deserve our support

OPINION: Schools have a significant role to play in preparing students for the new world of work.

Micro-aggressions metastasise

School leaders usually agree to disagree on many thorny education issues but are united in their view that schools must be places where children and young adults can learn and develop without fear of discrimination and harassment.

We can't stay in the dark over digital self-harm

OPINION: Self-trolling represents a disturbing new social platform for students who turn to self-harm to express their emotional trauma.

Concerted effort needed to change toxic online culture

OPINION: Businesses need to step up and work with schools to support initiatives and programs to counter online bullying.

Compelling business case for school connections

OPINION: Businesses that place emphasis on corporate social responsibility, or CSR, are attracting a growing share of consumer goodwill and spending.

Tall poppies and gender imbalance

OPINION: Undermining successful co-workers is not unique to schools, but it goes some way to explaining the under-representation of women in leadership roles.

Nurturing the new entrepreneurs

OPINION: Identifying student with an entrepreneurial bent and streaming their skills would bring a multitude of benefits.

Feedback helps you move forward

OPINION: Listening to feedback can be confronting, but failure to do so can be detrimental to a school’s performance.

The not-so-great age divide

OPINION: School leaders and parents are increasingly questioning the way classrooms are organised.

Partnership, not persecution

OPINION: Parents naturally want the best for their children, but increasingly forceful representations to, and demands of, teachers is a problem.

Size matters when it comes to burnout

OPINION: Determining the ideal classroom size is arguably the number one topic on the long list of thorny education issues to have divided policymakers, academics, school leaders, teachers, parents and even students over the past 50 years.

Bursting the school groupthink bubble

OPINION: The most effective school leaders know how to work cooperatively with the members of their team, even welcoming dissent, to achieve optimal outcomes.

Self-care essential for school leaders

OPINION: A failure to take care of one’s own wellbeing will quickly blunt a leader’s capacity to do what’s best for others.

Leaders can cure ‘change fatigue'

OPINION: You need to lead a significant change program at your school and are already bracing for the resistant rants of some of your colleagues.

Stop feeling like a leadership fake

OPINION: Growing demands on school leaders have led to a lack of confidence among many, fuelling the onset of ‘impostor syndrome’ within school communities.

Beware the school leader’s blind spots

OPINION: Those of us who have learned to drive a motor vehicle will no doubt recall the driving instructor alerting us to ‘blind spots’, the parts of the road to the side and slightly behind your vehicle that you can’t see in your side or rear view mirrors.

Time to get emotional about school leaders

OPINION: When teachers, students and parents reflect on their most admired school leader, what do you think springs to mind?

Most-read

School boards not for the faint hearted

OPINION: Expectations of school boards are changing, and their makeup is evolving accordingly.

Stop feeling like a leadership fake

OPINION: Growing demands on school leaders have led to a lack of confidence among many, fuelling the onset of ‘impostor syndrome’ within school communities.

Beware the school leader’s blind spots

OPINION: Those of us who have learned to drive a motor vehicle will no doubt recall the driving instructor alerting us to ‘blind spots’, the parts of the road to the side and slightly behind your vehicle that you can’t see in your side or rear view mirrors.

Feedback helps you move forward

OPINION: Listening to feedback can be confronting, but failure to do so can be detrimental to a school’s performance.

most commented

Time to get emotional about school leaders

OPINION: When teachers, students and parents reflect on their most admired school leader, what do you think springs to mind?

Beware the school leader’s blind spots

OPINION: Those of us who have learned to drive a motor vehicle will no doubt recall the driving instructor alerting us to ‘blind spots’, the parts of the road to the side and slightly behind your vehicle that you can’t see in your side or rear view mirrors.

Stop feeling like a leadership fake

OPINION: Growing demands on school leaders have led to a lack of confidence among many, fuelling the onset of ‘impostor syndrome’ within school communities.

Leaders can cure ‘change fatigue'

OPINION: You need to lead a significant change program at your school and are already bracing for the resistant rants of some of your colleagues.