Morning Headlines

Friday, 7 September, 2018 - 06:55

WA sheep exports to resume

After testing the market in recent weeks, Livestock Shipping Services yesterday put an order into the market for export wethers, to be delivered to its feedlots next Friday, for loading about a week later. The West

ATO may be forced to name tax dodgers

Crossbench senator Rex Patrick will use the coercive powers of Parliament to compel tax commissioner Chris Jordan to name financial institutions that have been found to have breached tax laws. The Aus

Strike at Alcoa ‘to continue’

About 1500 Alcoa workers were last night expected to extend their month-long strike at six sites in WA by voting against a wage deal proposed by the mining giant. The West

Wage earners to carry more of tax burden

Wage earners will shoulder an escalating tax burden to move the budget into a sustained surplus over the coming years, putting election pressure on the Morrison government and Labor to offer better long-term tax relief for workers. The Fin

Dutton calls Quaedvlieg a liar over au pair claim

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has labelled claims his chief of staff called the head of the Australian Border Force to seek assistance about getting an au pair out of detention as ‘‘entirely false and indeed fabricated’’. The Fin

Blackstone tops Oxford in new Investa fund bid

A high-octane race driving Australia’s commercial property market values up dramatically is under way with the world’s largest private equity firm Blackstone lobbing a counter bid to Canada’s pension fund-backed Oxford Properties for a $4.4 billion slice of the nation’s office towers. The Fin

Era of surpluses to shrink debt

The government will pay off three quarters of its $340 billion net debt over the next decade as rising personal income tax revenue and continued control of spending take the budget into a world of continuous surpluses. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Donald Trump is being managed by a ‘‘quiet resistance’’ of staffers protecting the United States from damaging aspects of the president’s agenda and ‘‘his worst inclinations’’, according to an extraordinary by a ‘‘senior administration official’’ published online by The New York Times.

Page 2: Accommodation marketplace Airbnb is expanding its business travel offering, known as Airbnb for Work, to include experiences, relocation and offsite meeting services, as it hopes to access the 75 per cent of workers who don’t regularly travel for work.

Page 3: New figures show the number of women on Australia’s boards hit 28.3 per cent at the end of August, up from 25.4 per cent a year ago.

Page 4: Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has labelled claims his chief of staff called the head of the Australian Border Force to seek assistance about getting an au pair out of detention as ‘‘entirely false and indeed fabricated’’.

Page 7: Wage earners will shoulder an escalating tax burden to move the budget into a sustained surplus over the coming years, putting election pressure on the Morrison government and Labor to offer better long-term tax relief for workers.

Page 8: Retailers fear breaching competition laws if they lift milk prices by 10¢ a litre and are anxiously awaiting advice from the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, which has been asked by Minister David Littleproud to investigate how a levy might be applied.

Page 12: Crossbench senator Rex Patrick will use the coercive powers of Parliament to compel tax commissioner Chris Jordan to name financial institutions that have been found to have breached tax laws.

Page 19: GrainCorp is stepping up shipments of grain from Western Australia to the east coast as supplies needed in the food manufacturing industry and to feed livestock run low in drought-hit states.

Page 34: A high-octane race driving Australia’s commercial property market values up dramatically is under way with the world’s largest private equity firm Blackstone lobbing a counter bid to Canada’s pension fund-backed Oxford Properties for a $4.4 billion slice of the nation’s office towers.

 

 

The Australian                                                                                                                          

Page 2: Australia successfully blocked China from funding a major regional military base in Fiji, a move that reveals intensifying concern in Canberra over strategic competition in the South Pacific region.

Page 6: The government will pay off three quarters of its $340 billion net debt over the next decade as rising personal income tax revenue and continued control of spending take the budget into a world of continuous surpluses.

Page 10: More airports have targeted Qantas for refusing to pay increased aeronautical charges designed to raise money for redevelopment and other improvements.

Page 19: Investors wiped more than $20 billion off Australian shares yesterday as a sell-off in the highflying US technology sector sparked widespread profit-taking.

The corporate watchdog has launched legal action accusing National Australia Bank of breaking the law 77 times and undermining confidence in the superannuation system over a fee-for-no-service scandal that allegedly siphoned more than $100 million from half a million unwitting customers.

Page 21: Telstra shares have jumped more than 3 per cent despite the telco trimming its 2019 full-year earnings forecasts due to a slowdown in the rollout of the National Broadband Network, with the market ignoring the minor adjustment and instead focusing on the upside of the delay.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 7: Dariush and Jahan Mahmoodshahi and their close mate Peter Molyneux, 26, concocted the series of events in which they claimed the theft of luxury brands including Rolex, Cartier, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Penfolds and Domaine de la Romanee-Conti wines.

Page 11: Half of all health fund members will have to pay higher premiums and switch to top cover policies to be insured for hip and knee replacements under key reforms.

Business: After testing the market in recent weeks, Livestock Shipping Services yesterday put an order into the market for export wethers, to be delivered to its feedlots next Friday, for loading about a week later.

About 1500 Alcoa workers were last night expected to extend their month-long strike at six sites in WA by voting against a wage deal proposed by the mining giant.

Breaker Resources is back in the good books with investors after lifting the resource at its Bombora gold deposit above the psychologically significant one million-ounce mark.

Sigma Healthcare shares have slumped after the pharmaceuticals supplier revealed a fall of more than 50 per cent in first-half profit to $13.4 million, partly because of restructuring costs after the loss of its contract in July to supply Chemist Warehouse